Library News

Feb 15 Downtime for RefWorks and Proquest Databases

On February 15, 2014 ProQuest will make improvements to its internal systems to accommodate a growing number of users and to reduce the need for future downtime.

To minimize the impact to you and your users these enhancements will be installed during an eight hour window of typically low usage from 10:00 UTC through 18:00 UTC.

During this time the following ProQuest products will not be available:

  • ProQuest
  • ProQuest Dialog
  • ProQuest Congressional
  • ProQuest K12 databases
  • ProQuest Genealogy databases
  • ProQuest Digital Microfilm
  • RefWorks

New Database: Scopus

SCOP-WOSWe have replaced our Web of Science databases, a package consisting of the Science Citation Index, the Social Sciences Citation Index, and the Arts & Humanities Citation index, with a new citation database, Scopus. We appreciate that Web of Science is used by many of you at Willamette, so we did not take this decision lightly. Before making this decision we examined content and functionality for Scopus and Web of Science; given these factors and that Scopus is a fraction the price, the decision was clear.

Currently, the main content differences are that Scopus covers more current content while Web of Science has deeper historical coverage.  Scopus indexes roughly 20,000 journals while Web of Science covers about 12,300 journal titles.  To give you a perspective on the number of unique journal titles that are not indexed by the other, Scopus currently indexes over 15,000 unique journals while Web of Science indexes nearly 4,400 journals not covered in Scopus.  A substantial amount of journal titles are indexed by both databases.

Scopus will have the same “Find It @ Willamette” button that links to the library catalog for fulltext, print, and interlibrary loan options.  Scopus also works smoothly with the citation tool called RefWorks.  In case you would like to know more about these two databases, here’s a link to more info: http://hlwiki.slais.ubc.ca/index.php/Scopus_vs._Web_of_Science

The Scopus database will be available for use starting in January, and our access to Web of Science will cease at the end of December.  If you have any questions about this process, please contact Ford Schmidt (fschmidt@willamette.edu, extension x5407).

Thanksgiving Break Hours

The Hatfield Library has special hours during Thanksgiving.

Wed, Nov. 27     7:45 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Thur – Sat, Nov. 28 – 30     CLOSED
Sun, Dec. 1   1 p.m. – 2 a.m.

Normal building hours resume Monday, November 26th.  The Hatfield Library staff wish the Willamette Community a most wonderful and safe Thanksgiving Break!

Brownbag Discussion with Former Staff to Senator Hatfield

BA feature-length documentary film highlighting the leadership and career of the late Senator Mark O. Hatfield will also premiere Tuesday, November 19 in Portland.

In conjunction with this event, the Mark O. Hatfield Library and University Archives are pleased to announce that several former Congressional staff members to Senator Hatfield, including a number of WU Alums, will be reuniting on campus and making themselves available for a conversation about Senator Hatfield.  This will take place on November 18th at 12-1pm in the Hatfield Room of the library. This gathering will provide an opportunity for an informal discussion of the Senator, his career, and most importantly, the staffers’ personal experiences working alongside the Senator through many incredible moments in Oregon and United States history.

Please bring your own lunch and lots of questions for this causal get-together. Light refreshments will be provided.  For additional information please contact Mary McRobinson, University Archivist, 503-370-6764; <mmcrobin@willamette.edu>

Information on The Hatfield Project and documentary film The Gentleman of the Senate: Oregon’s Mark Hatfield, including ticket information, can be found at: http://hatfieldfilm.com

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Senior Humanities Seminar Guest Scholar on Walt Whitman

All are invited to the following lecture being given by Ed Folsom, the world’s foremost expert on Walt Whitman. Folsom is visiting WU as this semester’s Senior Humanities Seminar guest scholar.

Thursday, October 24, 4:15-5:15pm
“‘That towering bulge of pure white’: Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, the Capitol Dome, and Black America”
Dr. Ed Folsom
Hatfield Room

This lecture examines how Walt Whitman and Herman Melville responded to the decision to expand the national Capitol building and to crown it with a massive white dome, and it explores how the dome was perceived in racial terms as it was being built and completed.

Folsom is the Carver Professor of American Literature at the University of Iowa. An award-winning teacher and scholar, he is the author, co-author, or editor of many books including Walt Whitman: The Measure of His Song (1981), Walt Whitman’s Native Representations (1994), Walt Whitman and the World (1995), Whitman East and West: New Contexts for Reading Walt Whitman (2002), Whitman Making Books/Books Making Whitman (2005), Re-Scripting Walt Whitman (2005), and Leaves of Grass: The Sesquicentennial Essays (2007). He edits the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review and co-directs the Walt Whitman Archive (http://www.whitmanarchive.org/).

More on Folsom:

http://www.uiowa.edu/be-remarkable/portfolio/people/folsom-e.html

Sounds of Harmony: Traditional Music in the Reconstruction of Identity and Healing

Sounds of Harmony: Traditional Music in the Reconstruction of Identity and Healing/Therapy of the Modern Mind-And-Heart

The Hatfield Library will have on display bamboo musical instruments from Yunnan, China, October 26-November 3rd. Also of note, there will be a public concert on traditional Chinese music and a seminar on traditional music and identity reconstruction (details below).

2013-xhibition-Concert-Seminar

 

 

Stowell Diary Now Digitized

The Willamette University Archives is excited to announce that the diary of Janette McCalley Stowell (1847-1916), which details the everyday life of a wife and mother at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth in Portland, Oregon and Sitka, Alaska is now available online.

Janette McCalley was born in Kirkcaldy, Scotland on January 29, 1847. She came to America with her parents in 1851 and the family moved to Salem, Oregon in 1859. Janette McCalley graduated from Willamette University with a B.S. in 1865 and taught for a time in the Preparatory Course at Willamette University. She married George Stowell on February 20, 1870 in Springfield, Oregon. She and George had four children.resolver

By 1888, the Stowell family had moved to Corbett Street in Portland, Oregon. In January, 1890, Janette Stowell began a diary which she kept, in an irregular fashion, until 1906. She died on February 4, 1916, and was survived by her husband, and three of her four children.
Stowell’s diary details the everyday life of a wife and mother at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth. She writes of keeping a garden and growing flowers, caring for her children, entertaining friends, going to church and her involvement in a branch of the Chautauqua Institute.

In February of 1890 the Portland area experienced a damaging flood which covered Ross Island and washed away many buildings and homes. Mrs. Stowell describes walking to where the family could see the flood waters covering Ross Island and watching debris pile up at the Ross Island Bridge.

In the late 1890s she joined a reading club and was more involved in growing roses. By 1900, after a break in the diary of two years, she reports the family is in Sitka, Alaska where her husband is working. The final entry in the diary is for August 25, 1906.

New “Summit” Library System

Big changes are in store for Willamette University. Starting in June 2013 the movement from 37 to one begins. We are moving with our Summit partner libraries from 37 stand-alone library systems to one shared system to improve the research experience for our students and faculty and to better manage our resources. The popular library system you have used to search for information and borrow library materials is being replaced by a new, improved user interface which will make it easier for you to find the information you need and get the items you are looking for both here at Willamette and through Summit.

Willamette University is a member of the Orbis Cascade Alliance, a consortium of 37 academic libraries across Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. The Alliance is the engine behind Summit but it is not the only initiative on which the 37 libraries collaborate. As a group, we are working toward unlocking opportunities that will help us to build our collections as a single collection, share services and resources, and exploit new technologies. This move from 37 to one will help us achieve those goals. Better managing our resources and creating efficiencies in processes will enable staff to focus on value added activities that will benefit our users and our institutions.Under Construction

Because this is a big migration from many systems to one, it will take 18 months to get all Alliance libraries up and running. In the meantime, you will experience a hybrid system, with many of the advantages of the new, next generation system and a few remnants of the old. All the benefits of the new system will become operational when the last group of libraries goes-live. Willamette is one of the first institutions to move to this new environment, so our services may be a bit bumpy during the transition. Information on how to use this new interface (including use of mobile apps) will be coming soon!

We appreciate your patience and good humor as we move to this better, easier to use library system.

Find out more about our new system coming in June 2013, or go to our FAQ page.

 

Better than Printing Tip #12: Condensing Photos and Image DPI

Condense your images. Shrink your photos or reduce Dots per Inch (DPI).

Large images can slow down your printing and waste paper on drafts. Here are some tips to help reduce waste and speed up printing.

    • Use placeholders for your images until your final drafts. Not only will it save a ton of paper but it can help you focus on the flow of the words and transitions.

  • If you have high resolution images (DPI — dots per inch), save them at lower resolution.  One way is to use Photoshop to change your DPI.  Copy your image, then open Photoshop, and click File and new.  A box will open in which you can change your DPI.  We recommend 75 DPI.  Photoshop is available on all campus computer labs.  

 

Better than Printing Tip #10: Condensing PowerPoint Slides

Did you know you can print several slides on one page? PowerPoint, Keynote, even Google Presentations all offer slick ways to print 2x,  4x, or even 6x slides on one pages. It’s perfect for lab references, taking notes, or just plain turning that monstrosity into a 6 page lapdog.

BONUS user-submitted tip! Print More than one page on a single sheet from PDFs: