Finals Week Extended Study Hours

Holiday Get TogetherThe Hatfield Library is now providing extended hours for final exams. Also, don’t forget about the free cookies provided by Bon Appetit and coffee provided by the library…usually the cookies are made available after 10 p.m. starting on Sunday, Dec. 10th until they run out.

These are the hours for the end of the term:

Monday, Dec. 4 – Thursday, Dec. 7 — 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 8 — 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 9 — 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 10 — 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 11 – Friday, Dec. 15 — 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 16 — 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 17 — CLOSED

Winter break begins on Monday, Dec. 18. During the break, the library will be open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on the weekends. Also, the library (and the rest of campus) will be closed from Dec. 23 through Jan. 2. Regular hours resume on Jan. 16.

Preparing for Semester’s End

December brings to mind hot chocolate, warm sweaters, snowflakes, holidays, winter break….ahhh! But another perhaps less pleasant word springs to mind when thinking about December…finals! Before you can completely relax by the fire sipping the hot beverage of your choice, you need to triumph over final papers and exams. Holiday Get Together Good strategies for coping with this time of the semester include figuring out smart ways to study, practicing mindfulness, avoiding procrastination, coping with anxiety, managing time wisely, etc. To help you through this particular challenge, take a look at some of the materials on these topics available through the library on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

Tree of Giving 2017

This year’s Tree of Giving Book Drive will benefit Four Corners Elementary.

We are seeking donations of new or slightly used children’s books to be donated to library of Four Corners Elementary School. We also encourage clothing donations such as hats, gloves and scarves for students at Four Corners.

Some ideas for book donate (both Spanish & English) are Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Pokemon, Amulet, Dork Diaries, Weird But True, and books about Legos to name a few.  Additional details about this program are available at:

The last day to donate is Friday, December 15. Items can be dropped off at The Willamette Store, Hatfield Library, Law Library, Bistro, Sparks Athletic Center, and Pi Beta Phi.

If you have any questions, please contact John Repplinger ( or Michael Smith ( Below is the poster used on our social media sites.

Thank you for your support!


Jacobson’s Photographs of the WU Football Team at Pearl Harbor

Kenneth W. Jacobson was born in Vancouver, Washington on September 19, 1921. Jacobson attended Willamette University and was a member of the Willamette University football team that played against the University of Hawaii in Oahu on December 6, 1941 as part of the Shrine Bowl. The team was stranded in Hawaii after the Pearl Harbor bombing on December 7, 1941. Willamette head coach, Spec Keene, volunteered the Willamette contingent to guard the perimeter of the Punahou School in Honolulu for ten days. Unable to fly home, the team remained in Hawaii until December 19, at which time they returned to the mainland aboard the ocean liner SS President Coolidge. While on board, the team bunked in steerage and, in exchange for passage, were assigned as hospital aides attending wounded men until the ship reached San Francisco on Christmas day. Jacobson enlisted in the U.S. Army on May 9, 1942, serving until March 5, 1946. After leaving the army, he continued his studies and graduated from Willamette University in 1947. He was hired by the Dallas, Oregon school district where he served as a teacher, coach, athletic director, and school administrator until he retired in 1983. He died in Dallas, Oregon in 2015.

Further information on the football team’s experiences in Pearl Harbor can be found in the Pearl Harbor Game collection.

Photographs from the Ken Jacobson collection can be viewed online. For further information about this collection, please see the finding aid.

Willamette team member on ship.

Pandas on the way home.

Bud Reynolds and Ken Jacobson

Bud Reynolds and Ken Jacobson

Schatz and Stahl Book Talk

Dear colleagues,

Please join us in the Hatfield Room at 4:30 on Wednesday 11/29 as Kate Schatz and Miriam Klein Stahl share their bestselling children’s books, Rad American Women A to Z and Rad Women Worldwide, and discuss “how to be rad in difficult times.” This event is free and open to the public, and it’s family friendly. We’ll have coffee and cookies, and the Willamette store will have books available for purchase. A book signing will follow the discussion.

This event is sponsored by Civic Communication and Media department, with significant support from Willamette’s Mellon-funded Learning By Creating initiative.

During their Willamette visit, Schatz and Klein Stahl will also lead a half-day workshop for students in CCM/AES/WGS 342, my course on U.S. Women’s Activism Since 1920. The workshop will support students’ collaborative project: a collection of visual portraits, biographies, and critical essays designed to enrich public understanding of women’s contributions to American life.  In addition, students will interview Schatz and Klein Stahl for the KMUZ radio show Worldviews Wednesdays, as part of the La Chispa project led by Professor Catalina de Onís.

About the speakers:

Kate Schatz is the New York Times-bestselling author of Rad American Women A-Z and Rad Women Worldwide. She’s a writer, editor, and educator, who’s been passionate about both writing and politics since she was a kid. She’s a co-founder of Solidarity Sundays, a nationwide network of feminist activist groups, and she lives with her family on the island of Alameda.

Miriam Klein Stahl is a Bay Area artist, educator and activist. In addition to her work in printmaking, drawing, sculpture, paper-cut and public art, she is also the co-founder of the Arts and Humanities Academy at Berkeley High School where she’s taught since 1995. As an artist, she follows in a tradition of making socially relevant work, creating portraits of political activists, misfits, radicals and radical movements. As an educator, she has dedicated her teaching practice to address equity through the lens of the arts. Her work has been widely exhibited and reproduced internationally. She lives in Berkeley, California with her wife, artist Lena Wolff, daughter Hazel, and their dog Lenny.

A Facebook page for the event is available at:

Faculty Colloquium: Leslie Dunlap

Please join us next Friday, December 1, at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenters: Leslie Dunlap, Continuing Professor in History, Film Studies, Women and Gender Studies, American Ethnic Studies Leslie Dunlap

Title: “Outraged Womanhood” and The Campaign to Close Ft. Gaston: Reckoning with the Rape Culture of American Empire

In the early 1890s, Hupa activist William E. Beckwith and Dorcas Spencer, a white woman reformer, effectively closed down a military post based on an exposé of sexual violence, yet outside of Hupa and California history, the story is little known. This paper documents and analyzes their campaign against military management of the Hoopa Reservation in northwestern California, and the broader critique they posed of sexual violence and American expansion. It finds that U.S. military authorities’ response to Beckwith and Spencer, alongside the hundreds of pages of testimony the investigation generated, provides some of the strongest evidence of the rape culture they identified. The talk raises a series of questions for discussion about how to interpret language steeped in the gender and generic conventions of the time; the limits of sources generated and collected as part of the colonizing process and the nature of the colonial archive; and how to weigh consent, given the era’s (and our own) debates about the conditions that enable consent, especially in the violent context of military occupation at that time.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Tommy Pico Reading

Please join us for the final event of the Fall 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by Tommy Pico. The reading will take place on Tuesday, November 14th, at 7:00 p.m. in the Hatfield Room (2nd floor of Hatfield Library) and is free and open to the public.

Tommy “Teebs” Pico is author of the books IRL (Birds, LLC, 2016), Nature Poem (Tin House Books, 2017), and Junk (forthcoming 2018 from Tin House Books). He was a Queer/Art/Mentors inaugural fellow, 2013 Lambda Literary fellow in poetry, a 2017 NYSCA/NYFA Fellow in Poetry from the New York Foundation for the Arts, and has been profiled in Fusion, Nylon, and the New Yorker. Originally from the Viejas Indian reservation of the Kumeyaay nation, he now lives in Brooklyn where he co-curates the reading series Poets With Attitude (PWA) with Morgan Parker at the Ace Hotel, co-hosts the podcast Food 4 Thot, and is a contributing editor at Literary Hub. @heyteebs

To give you a sense of his work, you’ll find a brief but descriptive review of Pico’s second collection, Nature Poem, from Publishers Weekly below:

“Pico (IRL) centers his second book-length poem on the trap of conforming to identity stereotypes as he ponders his reluctance to write about nature as a Native American. This is “fodder for the noble savage/ narrative,” he writes as ignorant people ask, “do I feel more connected to nature/ bc I’m NDN.” Other similarly problematic expectations are wryly discussed: “An NDN poem must reference alcoholism, like// I started drinking again after Mike Brown and Sandra Bland and CharlestonI felt so underwater it made no sense to keep dry.” As an extension of this dilemma, Pico poses questions about what is natural human behavior: Is it natural for a football player to assault his girlfriend? Is colonialism natural? What about the feeling one gets while listening to Beyoncé’s “Mine”? Pico’s alter-ego “Teebs” remains in constant motion, leaping from the dentist’s office to drag queen karaoke night to the movie theater: “I’m an adult I only let myself have/ candy at the movies/ so I’ve been going to the movies A LOT.” In making the subliminal overt, Pico reclaims power by calling out microaggressions and drawing attention to himself in the face of oppression, “the way the only thing more obvious than your body/ is leaving yr shirt on in the pool.” (May)

If you have any questions about the event, please contact Danielle Deulen at

Faculty Colloquium: Susik and Spalti

Please join us next Friday, November 17, at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenters: Abigail Susik, Associate Professor of Art History and Mike Spalti, Associate University Librarian for Systems
Title: “Pedagogy talk: Teaching with Digital Archives, Skype, Cell Phones and other Tech Stuff”

This joint presentation and discussion will cover tools and methods for enhancing student experience in the classroom with digital technology. We will discuss how digital archives are constructed as well as ways in which they might be employed for courses. We will also present some examples of past experiences teaching with Skype guest lectures, using cell phones for class activities, and other pedagogical resources using the web.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Faculty Colloquium: Janet Lorenzen

Please join us next Friday, November 10, at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Janet Lorenzen, Assistant Professor of Sociology
Title: “Addressing Climate Change at the Ballot: Challenges to Copying the Marriage Equality Movement”Janet Lorenzen

This talk draws on 58 interviews conducted between May 2015 and August 2017 with Oregon state: legislators, legislative staff members, environmental leaders, and professional lobbyists. Pro-environmental lobbyists were particularly keen to point out that marriage equality had succeeded in Oregon as a ballot measure. And they kept asking, why can’t we do that with a policy to address climate change? This talk discusses the possibilities and challenges of making Cap and Trade (aka the Clean Energy Jobs Bill, SB1070) into a ballot measure in Oregon in 2018.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Celebrating National Aviation Month

People dreamt about the miracle of flight long before the American aviation pioneers, the Wright brothers, were born…remember the sketches of Leonardo da Vinci’s famed flying machine?  It is fascinating to think back to a time when airplanes were only vague dreams and to consider the hard work, ingenuity, creativity, intelligence, determination, and courage of the men and women who made aviation more than a flight of fancy!  November is National Aviation Month, which gives us an opportunity to celebrate and explore the history of aeronautics.

In recognition of National Aviation Month, we have listed a few of the aviation-related books available in the Hatfield Library on our WU Reads Reading Guide.  Enjoy!

You haven’t seen a tree until you’ve seen its shadow from the sky.–Amelia Earhart

(Image based off of NASA National Aviation Day Poster)