Eunice Parsons Papers

Eunice Parsons was born in 1916 in Loma, Colorado but spent most of her young life in Chicago. When she was a young girl, she attended children’s classes at the University of Chicago where she learned an appreciation for art, as well as the skills that would allow her to pursue a career in the field later in life. After graduating high school, Parsons attended a few art classes from the University of Chicago. Soon after, Parsons married and moved to Portland along with her new husband. She spent the next two decades as a working mother. In the 1940s she began taking classes at the Portland Museum Art School. Shortly after, in 1957, she took a trip to New York to acquaint and immerse herself in the culture of art. Parsons took a sketchbook where she made exhaustive notes and depicted many landscapes. This notebook showcases her earliest inclinations in playing with color, line, and shading, all developing into a unique and distinctive style. After returning from New York, Parsons continued her career as an artist and eventually began teaching at the Portland Museum Art School. While teaching, she became notorious as a blunt but brilliant instructor and would lead numerous student trips to Europe and the birthplaces of western art. In 2006 Parsons, along with others, was instrumental in opening the 12×16 Gallery in Portland. In 2017 she continues to be an influential and prolific artist at the age of 100.

The Eunice Parsons papers encompass not only Eunice Parsons’ long and influential career as a Portland artist, but also the inner workings of the Portland art community from the early 1950s through to the present day. It contains Parsons’ manuscripts from her endeavors as an author, fliers from a variety of Portland artists, photographs and slides from her teaching career, samples of her art and sketchbooks, professional papers, and a great wealth of correspondence in the form of Christmas cards from many of the most famous Portland artists.

For additional information about this collection, visit:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/5012

Also, view the online exhibit of a few selected sketch books: exhibit by the same intern who processed her collection:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/archives/omeka/exhibits/show/matriarchofmodernism/introduction

Note: The Eunice Parsons papers collection was processed and the exhibition created by McKelvey Mandigo-Stoba, Willamette University ’17, during an Archives & Special Collections Internship.

 


Betty LaDuke Conversation

You’re invited! Join us for a panel discussion exploring the roles art and activism play in raising awareness, creating social change, and advocating for justice.

Talk Title:  Social Justice Through Art, Advocacy, and Activism: A Conversation with Artist Betty LaDuke and Guests

Topics discussed will include human rights, sustainability, and immigration within a local, national and international context, with a focus on current events such as Standing Rock and DACA. Internationally recognized artist and activist Betty LaDuke will present an artist’s talk followed by a panel discussion. Joining LaDuke for the discussion is Native hip hop artist Scott Kalama (Warm Springs) aka Blue Flamez, and Willamette University student and President of Willamette’s Native and Indigenous Student Union Alexus Uentillie (Diné) ’19.  Also offered in conjunction with the panel discussion are the exhibits on display in Goudy Commons, the Mark O. Hatfield Library, Rogers Music Hall, and third floor of the University Center (Putnam).

Date/Time: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 4:30-6:00 p.m.

Location: Ford Hall – Theatre

Audience: Free and open to the public. General Seating.

Sponsors:  Willamette University Green Grant Fund, the Mark O. Hatfield Library, the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, and University Archives and Special Collections.

Questions: Contact Mary McRobinson (mmcrobin@willamette.edu, 503-370-6764) and Jonathan Bucci (jbucci@willamette.edu, 503-370-6861).

 


6th Annual Edible Book Festival

THE MARK O. HATFIELD LIBRARY PRESENTS THE SIXTH ANNUAL EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL 

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, the Hatfield Library is pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by your favorite book, poem, character, or author—the only limit is your imagination.  Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible! Here are links to previous years’ entries (201620152014, 20132012).

Drop off your entries in the Hatfield Room on March 10 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible “book” between 8:00 a.m.-noon and 1:00-4:00 p.m.

At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—Michael Chasar, Monique Bourke, and Karla Gutierrez— will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Individual Student Entry
  • Best Student Group Entry
  • Most Literary
  • Most Creative
  • Punniest
  • People’s Choice

Light refreshments will be provided!

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715
cdrost@willamette.edu

 


Annual Tree of Giving Book Drive

The annual Tree of Giving Book Drive has officially begun.

The Hatfield Library, The Willamette Store and the Bistro are seeking donations of new or slightly used children’s books to be donated to Swegle Elementary School‘s library. We also encourage you to donate hats, gloves and scarves for students at Swegle.

The last day to donate is Tuesday, December 20. Items can be dropped off at The Willamette Store, Hatfield Library, Bistro or Sparks Athletic Center.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask. Attached is an image of the poster for distribution on social media.

Thank you for your support!

 

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(Update January 4th, 2017)

Thank you for your support of the 2016 Tree of Giving Book Drive sponsored by the Mark O. Hatfield Library, the Willamette Store and the Bistro. We collected 171 books, 20 pairs of gloves, 6 scarves and 4 hats. The books will be added to Swegle Elementary School’s library and the gloves, scarves and hats will be distributed by the employees and teachers to students in need.

Again, thank you for your continued support and we look forward to the 2017 book drive.


Fall Semester Hours

We will continue our shortened building hours throughout the week of August 22nd (8 am – 5 pm).  On Saturday we will be open 10-4pm, but closed all day Sunday.  Monday, August 29, the first day of class, our hours will extend to 8 am – Midnight.

Our full semester hours will begin Monday, August 5th (7:45 am – 2 am) weekdays, Saturdays (10 am – 9 pm), and Sundays (10 am – 2 am).

Details at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar/

 

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(Image source: Pixabay.com)


Welcome (Back)

Welcome to the Mark O. Hatfield Library, for those who are new to our library.  And welcome back for those who are returning!  We are ready for your return, and hope you’re ready to come back.  As you probably already know, we have top notch librarians to help with your upcoming research, plus excellent tools and resources.

Here is a link to get to a page that will help orient you to our library, or refresh your knowledge.  (And for the record, several Pokemon have been found in and around the library!)


Faculty Colloquium: What I Learned in Prison

Dear Colleagues, buissm
Please join us this Friday, April 29th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our eleventh and final Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Melissa Buis Michaux, Associate Professor of Politics

Title: What I Learned in Prison

Abstract:  The United States currently incarcerates about 2.4 million men, women and children.  The number of incarcerated does not take into account how many people’s lives are touched by our extensive system of punishment, including those on parole or probation; children of incarcerated parents; and communities that support prison systems.  Furthermore, racial disparities in arrests, sentencing, and prison time call into question our guarantees of equal justice and fundamental fairness.  Inside the prison walls, many prisoners are subject to a system of control that prioritizes punishment over rehabilitation.  All of this I knew before I stepped inside a prison.  Come hear what I learned—about prison, the people behind the walls, and myself—once I went inside.  I will also be joined by some students from my “Reforming Criminal Justice” class that has been going inside the Oregon State Penitentiary this semester and working alongside prisoners.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.
Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


2016 Edible Book Festival Results

5th Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our fifth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on April 1st 2016, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners who each won a nifty mug:  Joni Roberts, Carol Drost, KayLyn Stirton and Yasmine Robles, Leslie Whitaker, and Dillon Peck.  The exhibits were all deliciously inspired!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event. Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 20152014, 2013, and 2012. For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
09-frosting
“Frosting the Doughman”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
“Frosty the Snowman”
Punniest
06-mandarines “The Mandarins

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
Simone de Beauvoir’s
“The Mandarins”
Most Literary
16-war “War(heads)
and Peas”

Created by
Kaylyn Stirton &
Yasmine Robles
Inspired by
Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Best Student Entry
03-boys The Boys in
the Boat

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Daniel Brown’s
“The Boys in the Boat”
Most Creative
02-marzipan
“The Mars-ipan”

Created by
Dillon Peck
Inspired by
Andy Weir’s
“The Martian”
People’s Choice

 

Other Entries ……………………………..
01-salt “The Salt in Our Stars”

Created by
Audrey Nieswandt
Inspired by
John Green’s
“The Fault in Our Stars”
04-remains “The Remains of the
Day(Night Donuts)”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Kazuo Ishiguro
“The Remains of the Day”
05-three-musketeers “Western Canon”

Created by
Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by
Alexandre Dumas’
“Western Literature:
Three Musketeers”
07-two-cities “It was the Best of Times,
It was the Wurst of Times”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Charles Dicken’s
“A Tale of Two Cities”
08-dirt
“The Good Earth”

Created by
Paul Meuse
Inspired by
Pearl S. Buck’s
“The Good Earth”
10-none
“And Then There
Were None”

Created by
Allison Johnson
Inspired by
Agatha Christie’s
“And Then There Were None”
11-water
“Like Water for Chocolate”

Created by
Allison Johnson
Inspired by
Laura Esquivel’s
“Like Water for Chocolate”
12-gas
“Gone with the Wind: Remembrance of
Things Passed”

Created by
Al Furtwangler
Inspired by
Margaret Mitchell’s
“Remembrance of Things Past
and Gone with the Wind”
13-waldo “Pears Waldo”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
Martin Handford’s
“Where’s Waldo”
14-fish “A String in the Carp”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Nancy Bond’s
“A String in the Harp”
15-bread “Bride and Bread Juices”

Created by
Doreen Simonsen
Inspired by
Jane Austen’s
“Pride and Prejudice”
17-bottles “The Naked Lunch”

Created by
Jason Yelle
Inspired by
William S. Burroughs’
“The Naked Lunch”
18-walk “The Ones Who Walk
Away from the Omelets”

Created by
Bistro
Inspired by
Ursula K. Le Guin’s
“The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”

Liquid Sky, Faculty Colloquium by Chuck Williamson

williamsonsm

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 1st at 3 pm. in the Kremer Board Room (FORD 102) for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Chuck Williamson, Professor of Chemistry
 

Title: Liquid Sky: Liquid-Liquid Mixtures, Light Scattering, and Critical Behavior

Abstract:  The romance of a bottle of wine and a technicolor sunset – perhaps the perfect pairing of a liquid-liquid mixture with light scattering phenomena. This talk will strive for a second-best pairing by showing how light scattering may be used to understand the physical properties of liquid-liquid mixtures. At first glance, pouring two nonreactive liquids together to make a mixture seems like a very simple physical process. Sometimes two liquids mix completely, like ethanol and water do in alcoholic beverages. Sometimes the liquids stay in two layers and do not mix very much at all, like oil and water. However, many pairs of liquids show both types of behavior: the liquids mix completely for some temperatures and some mixing ratios, but the liquids separate into two layers at other conditions. In this talk I will discuss the laser light scattering method we use to make maps of the exact conditions in which two liquids mix to form a single layer, or phase. I will introduce special points on the maps called critical points, and show the universal and beautiful physical behavior that all liquid-liquid mixtures exhibit at a critical point, like critical opalescence and spinodal decomposition. I will also present a new type of fundamental liquid-liquid phase behavior my students and I have observed here at Willamette. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the complex ways in which light can scatter from a liquid-liquid mixture by incorporating examples of light scattering found in the atmosphere, such as the whiteness of clouds and fog, the blueness of the sky, and solar halos. There is also a brief shout out to Edvard Munch.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Lausanne Hall Through the Years

Many students have lived in Lausanne Hall throughout the years, and in celebration of this landmark campus building we have a display with numerous photos and historical descriptions.  Below are some of the photos and description plates about Lausanne Hall which will be on display until May 15th.

l2Throughout Lausanne Hall’s History, she has had many names Woman’s College, Women’s College, Lausanne Hall, and the U.S.S. Lausanne.  And the name Lausanne has been used for three different buildings.

There are some fun quotes highlighting life in Lausanne Hall, such as from the Willamette Collegian, November 11, 1909: “No more fear from fire at the Hall now.  We have a new chemical fire extinguisher and a chain-ladder fire escape. ”  Then a week later in the Collegian, “Lausanne Hall was saved from destruction by fire last Saturday by gallant efforts of Messrs. Oakes, Anderson and Booth.  As is the case with boys, they visited the kitchen afterwards.”

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In 1918, the old Lausanne Hall was condemned, and a song was made about its languishing condition: “There’s an old historic building, Fames in story and in song. Where the Westland’s fairest daughters Linger: may they linger long.  Old Lausanne may not look splendid, Its appearance don’t deride, it is some majestic ruin, When you view it from the inside.  (Second Chorus) Through insurance underwriters Think its fire risk is too great To Protect it by insurance. Yet it’s here we want to state Thought they call it an “Old Firetrap…”

In October of 1919, the old Lausanne Hall was razed by the Willamette “boys” and finished by professional workmen.  The old Music Building at Willamette was remodeled and temporarily used for housing for the young women at Willamette while the new home was being built.

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As World War II rolled around, in December of 1942 the Board of Trustees approved a plan to offer Lausanne Hall as a men’s dormitory in the event Willamette was selected as a site for a Navy or Army training unit for World War II.  In April, 1943, Willamette was selected as a site to offer the V-12 naval program and plans are made to house 150 men in Lausanne, and a few months later in July 270 men reported to Willamette University’s naval headquarters (Gatke Hall). In October 1945, the V-12 Navy program comes to an end.

L1