Teaching with Digital Archives

Please join us TODAY, Friday, November 17, at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenters: Abigail Susik, Associate Professor of Art History and Mike Spalti, Associate University Librarian for Systems

SpaltiSusik
Title: “Pedagogy talk: Teaching with Digital Archives, Skype, Cell Phones and other Tech Stuff”

This joint presentation and discussion will cover tools and methods for enhancing student experience in the classroom with digital technology. We will discuss how digital archives are constructed as well as ways in which they might be employed for courses. We will also present some examples of past experiences teaching with Skype guest lectures, using cell phones for class activities, and other pedagogical resources using the web.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Up next, Leslie Dunlap on Friday, December 1.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Janet Lorenzen

Please join us next Friday, November 10, at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Janet Lorenzen, Assistant Professor of Sociology
Title: “Addressing Climate Change at the Ballot: Challenges to Copying the Marriage Equality Movement”Janet Lorenzen

This talk draws on 58 interviews conducted between May 2015 and August 2017 with Oregon state: legislators, legislative staff members, environmental leaders, and professional lobbyists. Pro-environmental lobbyists were particularly keen to point out that marriage equality had succeeded in Oregon as a ballot measure. And they kept asking, why can’t we do that with a policy to address climate change? This talk discusses the possibilities and challenges of making Cap and Trade (aka the Clean Energy Jobs Bill, SB1070) into a ballot measure in Oregon in 2018.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Gaetano DeLeonibus, Faculty Colloquium

Gaetano DeLeonibus

Please join us next Friday, October 27, at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester and the second in our Pedagogy/Digital Humanities series.

Presenter: Gaetano DeLeonibus, Professor of French and Francophone Studies
Title: “Digitizing André Breton’s 17th-Century Carib-French Dictionary”

I attended a week-long intensive workshop (June 5-9, 2017), “Text Encoding Fundamentals and their Application,” an introduction to the theory and practice of encoding texts for the humanities. More specifically, the workshop introduced the non-initiate to the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding original texts in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. During the workshop, I began to encode several pages of a 17th-century Carib-French dictionary with the XML Editor Oxygen.

This presentation will first give an overview of Breton’s dictionary, then delve into my experience at the workshop, and describe the use I’ve been making of the text and project in FREN 336.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Gaetano DeLeonibus

Please join us Friday, October 27 at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Presenter: Gaetano DeLeonibus, Professor of French and Francophone StudiesGaetano DeLeonibus
Title: “Digitizing André Breton’s 17th-Century Carib-French Dictionary”

I attended a week-long intensive workshop (June 5-9, 2017), “Text Encoding Fundamentals and their Application,” an introduction to the theory and practice of encoding texts for the humanities. More specifically, the workshop introduced the non-initiate to the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding original texts in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. During the workshop, I began to encode several pages of a 17th-century Carib-French dictionary with the XML Editor Oxygen.

This presentation will first give an overview of Breton’s dictionary, then delve into my experience at the workshop, and describe the use I’ve been making of the text and project in FREN 336.

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Marva Duerksen

Please join us Friday, October 13 at 3 p.m. in Fine Arts West 145 for our fifth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Presenter: Marva Duerksen, Associate Professor of Music
Title: Proleptic Rhetoric and Survival of the “Self”: Composer Niccoló Castiglioni On Dickinson’s “I heard a Fly buzz—”

In “I heard a fly buzz – when I died,” poet Emily Dickinson adopts a proleptic, or anticipatory, rhetorical stance from which to probe haunting questions of death and the boundaries separating death from life. The poem’s speaker, an implicit self, dies, and yet, impossibly, survives to narrate the story of their death. In this presentation I examine Italian composer Niccoló Castiglioni’s interpretation of Dickinson’s “Fly,” focusing on ways in which the composer builds on Dickinson’s poetic design to craft a musical self, position that self within a musical space, and support or engineer its demise. Broadening the inquiry, I consider the stakes for poet and composer. If proleptic positioning supports an enduring poetic self, might it not also point to Dickinson’s desire for survival beyond death of her own creative self? And, as composers take up this proleptic self musically, could they be engaging ongoing anxieties about the survival of our own artistic and embodied selves?

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Nathan Sivers Boyce

Please join us Friday, October 6 at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our fourth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Presenter: Nathan Sivers Boyce, Associate Professor of Economics
Title: Economics Curricular Reform at Willamette University

In August 2014 Willamette University began offering a new economics curriculum. The purpose of this paper is to describe it in more detail and explain our rationale for adopting it. Key changes include commitments to: begin with economic issues that motivate questions for analysis; incorporate the history of economic thought in a systematic way and embrace explicit pluralism. We argue that designing an explicitly pluralist curriculum requires determining how to organize economic thought, how to structure the curriculum to embed pluralism, and how to embody pluralism in the core courses. Our approach to pluralism organizes economic thought according to a “grand traditions” approach and is fully integrated into the curriculum, developing multiple perspectives side-by-side in each course. We argue that these reforms will help us better prepare students for independent, critical inquiry into economic issues.

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Ortwin Knorr

Please join us Friday, September 29nd at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Presenter: Ortwin Knorr, Associate Professor of Classics
Title: Using Digital Technology in Teaching a College Colloquium about Film

Integrating digital technology into one’s own teaching can be relatively simple yet pay great dividends, as my experience with my College Colloquium, “Ancient Greece and Rome in the Movies,” may demonstrate. In this presentation, I will discuss my use of simple Powerpoints for pre- and post-tests as well as short lectures on visual concepts; the use of a course blog to draw out more reserved students and to start a discussion outside of class; writing assignments that are tied to existing contributor-fed sites such as the Internet Movie Database (imdb); and the final course project, the students’ creation of their own illustrated website about a movie or movie-related topic of their choice, using free and easy-to-learn software like weebly or wix.

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Shatha Almutawa

Please join us Friday, September 22nd at 3 pm. in the Alumni Lounge for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Presenter: Shatha Almutawa,Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
Title: “Do Muslims Dance Tango?” Religion, Secularism, and the Body in Post-Coup Turkey

Every night in the city of Istanbul, hundreds of men and women gather in dance studios, hotels, nightclubs, and on rooftops to dance the Argentine tango. The communities of tango dancers in Turkey are known to be among the largest—if not the largest—communities in the world outside of Argentina. Turkish tango dancers are renowned for their skill and are known around the world to dance beautifully and with passion. Sensual and intimate, tango is often danced in a close embrace and requires interactions between men and women that are not always compatible with the norms of Turkish society. This talk draws on fieldwork in Turkey and interviews with tango dancers in Istanbul about their histories with tango, their relationships to their religion, and their perceptions of the two cultures to which they belong: Turkish culture and Argentine tango culture. In a country that was founded as a secular republic, Muslims dance tango under the portrait of Atatürk, which has become an important symbol of resistance as Turkey undergoes a government-sponsored religious revival.

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Jade Aguilar

Please join us this Friday, September 8th at 3 pm. in Ford 102 for our first Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided and please note the change in location.

Presenter: Jade Aguilar, Vice President for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion
Title:  “The Promises and Pitfalls of Engaging Male Juvenile Offenders in Gender Violence Prevention and Bystander Education”

Drawing on interviews with and observations of boys enrolled in a bystander violence prevention program at a juvenile detention center, this article provides a sociological case study on how the boys’ biographies and violent lived experiences shaped their engagement with the program. Previous research on bystander prevention programs has typically focused on men enrolled in college who do not have the same kinds of violent histories as the boys in this study do. This article builds upon prior research on prevention programs by demonstrating how at-risk youth participants understand and access the program. We offer suggestions for tailoring bystander prevention programs to more adequately address the specific needs of these populations.

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Michaela Kleinert

Please join us this Friday, April 7th at 3 pm. in Collins 318 for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided and please note the change in location.

Presenter: Michaela Kleinert, Associate Professor of Physics
Title:  “Danger! Do not look into the laser beam with your remaining eye!” – Or – What is going on in Kleinert’s research lab?

Since its invention in 1960, the laser has become an integral part of our society. While most everyday lasers are cw (continuous wave) lasers of low power – for example barcode scanners at the grocery checkout –, powerful pulsed lasers that produce extremely short bursts of light (between only a billionth and a millionth of a billionth of a second long!) find more specialized applications both in research and industry. From the creation of super-hydrophobic surfaces that are completely water-repellent to the formation of micrometer sized structures that guide light or allow computers to work properly, from identifying explosives at long range to determining the chemical composition of ancient coins or even rocks on Mars – if you can imagine it, there is a laser to do the job!


A generous donation of two 10-ps pulsed laser systems (ESI, Beaverton) has allowed me to enter this fascinating field of research, and in this talk I will discuss projects that are currently being investigated in my research lab. I will introduce the physics of laser/material interaction that leads to the formation of microstructures on metallic surfaces. I will also talk about the plasma plume, the ejected material that forms above the surface and that can be a blessing and a curse: A dense plume leads to strong recombination lines as the electrons recombine with their respective ions. This is advantageous when investigating laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) since it amplifies the characteristic chemical fingerprints that allow us to identify unknown samples. On the other hand, a large plasma plume also acts as a shield and prevents the laser light from hitting the surface (plasma shielding). This of course is not desired when the goal is to pattern the surface in a controlled way (micromachining).

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators