Foundational Scientific Reasoning

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 21st at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Courtney Stevens and Melissa Witkow, Associate Professors of Psychology,
 

Title:  Promoting foundational scientific reasoning skills in Introductory Psychology: Findings from an NSF-IUSE curriculum grant

In this talk, we will describe our collaborative work over the past 5 years to develop and assess new materials to improve the training of scientific reasoning skills in introductory psychology.  This work was initially inspired by changes to the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) to include psychology-focused questions. These questions highlighted the potential for introductory psychology to move beyond traditional content coverage to include stronger training of scientific reasoning skills, including data interpretation and research design. Our talk will cover a series of studies, moving from initial efforts in our own classes at Willamette to broader efforts involving other instructors at WU, as well as Chemeketa Community College and Oregon State University. The talk will highlight the course modules and assessment results, as well our design process. This work was funded by a Keck grant (iScience; PIs: Mark Stewart and Stas Stavrianeas) and an NSF-IUSE grant (PIs: Courtney Stevens, Melissa Witkow, and Kathy Becker-Blease).

Students are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

 

Professor Parayil

Tuesday April 18, 4:15 in the Library’s Hatfield Room,  Prof. Govindan Parayil will give the 2017 Teppola Chair lecture on “The Return of ‘the Machinery Question’ and the Failed Promise of Globalization.”
Abstract: Political economists and social critics of the 19th century theorized “the machinery question”: the rage against machines by unemployed former artisans and alienated workers after the onset of modern capitalism. Two centuries later, resistance to the “march of the machine” has returned.  Whereas the Luddites in the 19th century English mills attacked textile machines as tangible instruments of their oppression, information-age revolts rage against the post-Cold War global political and economic order. There is public anxiety and fear that the twin forces of globalization and technological innovation are forging an economic future in which most work will be done by autonomous technologies.  Looming in scholarly debates and public discourse is the prospect of a dystopia worse than the one Charlie Chaplin portrayed in the film “Modern Times,” that is, an economic marketplace where humans need not apply.  In Bill Joy’s words, we fear a future “that doesn’t need us.”  In this talk, I will investigate whether, as several major technological advances revolutionize the world’s political economy, it is possible to have a fair economic future in the face of gross asymmetries in social relations, political power, and economic opportunities for the marginalized and excluded majority.

Acclaimed Novelist Leah Stewart

Please join us for the final event of the Spring 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by acclaimed novelist Leah Stewart and a celebration of the first annual Mark and Melody Teppola Creative Writing Prizes at Willamette, with food, drink, and readings by our winners in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. The readings and celebration take place on Thursday, April 20, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room and are free and open to the public.

Leah Stewart is the critically acclaimed author of The History of UsHusband and WifeThe Myth of You and Me, and Body of a Girl. The recipient of a Sachs Fund Prize and a NEA Literature Fellowship, she teaches in the creative writing program at the University of Cincinnati.

The New York Times Book Review says of her newest novel, The New Neighbor, “In simple, elegant language, Leah Stewart draws us to a little pond hidden away in the mountains of Tennessee… Stewart never relaxes her tight focus on these complex characters.”

Read an interview with Leah here: http://www.washingtonindependentreviewofbooks.com/features/an-interview-with-leah-stewart

The winners of this year’s Mark & Melody Teppola Creative Writing Prizes are:

Poetry: Lara Zetzsche, for “Electronegativity of Atoms,” judged by Michelle Y. Burke

Nonfiction: JoAnna Hernandez, for “Tongue Tied,” judged by Jay Ponteri

Fiction: Jacob Kirn, for “Voodoo,” judged by Leah Stewart

 

Image sources from leahstewart.com


Colonial Latin America Myth-Making

Professor Adorno is not only a distinguished scholar, but she has also written quite successfully for a general audience, and she is an excellent guest speaker. She will give a public lecture, “Gonzalo Guerrero: Hearsay and History in Myth-Making about Colonial Latin America,” on Friday, April 14th at 3pm in the Hatfield Room.

Talk abstract:

“Gonzalo Guerrero” is the name given by sixteenth-century Spanish chroniclers to a shipwreck victim who was thought to have joined Maya society and became a Maya war lord who thwarted the Spanish conquest of Yucatan (Mexico). The retelling of the story has proven irresistible: as recently as fifteen years ago there appeared a newly discovered “autobiography” of Gonzalo—and it was not the first. Tracing this series of arresting accounts through the centuries in both Spanish-language and Anglo-American English-language traditions, we will consider how fiction emerged from history and hearsay in the Latin American literary tradition. Taking this celebrated example from the chronicles of the Spanish conquest period, we will contemplate the issue of  how vaguely known historical events become the object of hearsay, eventually creating myths that are ultimately given the credence and weight of history. This lecture will be illustrated (PowerPoint).


Lecture: Electoral Politics in Southeast Asia

The Center for Asian Studies is pleased to invite you to a lecture and presentation by Prof. Meredith Weiss, University at Albany SUNY) on “Electoral Politics in Southeast Asia: Policy, Patronage, and Public Interest.”  The lecture will be on Monday, April 10 at 4:15 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of the Hatfield Library.  Refreshments will be served.

“Throughout Southeast Asia, in a range of phenomena sometimes collectively labeled “money politics,” candidates for elected office distribute patronage— benefits that might include cash, food and other goods, public-sector jobs, infrastructure projects, or other rewards—via clientelist networks. Sometimes illegal or illicit, other times above-ground and at least tacitly condoned, such practices span the electoral cycle and deeply inflect the quality and character of governance structures, democracy, and national integration. This seminar will offer an overview of a multi-year, cross-national, collaborative research project to track and compare these practices and their implications for candidates, political parties, citizens, and policies in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand.”

Read more about Professor Weiss at: http://www.albany.edu/rockefeller/faculty_pos_weiss.shtml


Roger Lowenstein Talk

The Economics Department, with support from the Gillis Fund, is excited to announce a talk by financial writer and bestselling author Roger Lowenstein on Monday, April 3rd at 4:15 p.m.  This event will be held in the Hatfield Room, and is free and open to the public.  There will be a book signing after the talk.

 


Results for the Edible Book Festival

Results for the 6th Annual Edible Book Festival!!!

Our sixth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 10th, 2017. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners who each won a $5 Bistro card:  Joni Roberts, Carol Drost, KayLyn Stirton and Yasmine Robles, Leslie Whitaker, and Dillon Peck.  The exhibits were all deliciously inspired!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event. Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 20152014, 2013, and 2012. For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
“Brownie Bear, Brownie Bear”

Created by
Mehayla Repplinger
Inspired by Eric Carle’s
“Brown Bear, Brown Bear”
People’s Choice
“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Created by
Liz Perkin & Gabrielle James
Inspired by
Mark Twain’s
“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”
Most Literary
“Midsummer Rice Dream”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
William Shakespeare’s
“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”
Punniest
“Caesar’s Garlic War”

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
Julius Caesar’s
“Caesar’s Gallic War”
Most Creative

 

 

Other Entries ……………………………..
“Peep Wars”

Created by
Selicity Icefire
Inspired by
George Lucas’
“Star Wars: A New Hope”
Peep Wars “Toot”

Created by
Paul Meuse
Inspired by
Leslie Patricelli’s
“Toot”
Peeps Jackson and the Olive-ians “Peeps Jackson and the
Olive-ians”

Created by
Brianna & Eliane Goff
Inspired by
Rick Rioran’s
“Percy Jackson and the Olympians”
Wild Mountain Thyme “Wild Mountain Thyme”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Rosamunde Pilcher’s
“Wild Mountain Thyme”
The Rosemary Spell “The Rosemary Spell”

Created by
Shelby Radcliffe & Kendra Mingo
Inspired by
Virginia Zimmerman’s
“The Rosemary Spell”
Many Waters “Many Waters”

Created by
Caleb Repplinger
Inspired by
Madeleine L’Engle’s
“Many Waters”
Celery Stalks at Midnight “Celery Stalks at Midnight”

Created by
Timothy Repplinger
Inspired by
Will Bradley’s
“Celery Stalks at Midnight”

The Done Cow
“The Done Cow”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Walter Wangerin’s
“The Book of the Dun Cow”
The Bone People “The Bone People”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
Martin Handford’s
“The Bone People”
“One Flew Over the
Cuckoo’s Nest”

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Ken Kesey’s
“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”
“Double Fudge”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Judy Blume’s
“Double Fudge”
“Who Moved my Cheese?”

Created by
Robert Minato
Inspired by
Spencer Johnson’s
“Who Moved my Cheese”

 

 

Extra Photos ………………       ……………..
 

 

 

 

 

 


Steampunk Fiction Lecture

“The Rise and Roots of Steampunk Fiction”
Lecture by Professor Rachel Bowser
Thursday, April 6th4:15 p.m.
Hatfield Room, Hatfield Library

 

Event Description: Once a small subculture, the steampunk phenomenon exploded during the first years of the twenty-first century, its prominence increasing ever since. From its Victorian and literary roots to film and television, video games, music, and even fashion, this subgenre of science fiction reaches far and wide in current culture. Steampunk matters in many ways–from disability and queerness to ethos and digital humanities. This lecture will discuss why we should be paying closer attention to this influential genre.

 

About the Speaker: Dr. Rachel A. Bowser is Associate Professor of English at Georgia Gwinnett College, just north of metro Atlanta. She researches and writes about Victorian fiction and steampunk, and teaches and talks about all kinds of British fiction, science fiction, and composition. In the 2017-2018 academic year, she will serve as a fellow in the American Council on Education leadership program. She is co-author of Like Clockwork: Steampunk Pasts, Presents, & Futures (Minnesota UP, 2016).

 


Talk by Vershawn Ashanti Young

“Should Students Use They Own English?” by Vershawn Ashanti Young

Wednesday, March 15, 4:30 p.m.
Location: Hatfield Room

In this talk, Young explains and demonstrates why students must develop agency, authority, and authenticity in all of their writing, and why they must also bring style, substance, and individuality to their writing in school and professional contexts. Young is an Associate Professor in the Department of Drama and Speech Communication and the Department of English at the University of Waterloo, Canada, where he teaches African American rhetoric, performance studies, and public communication. He is author of Your Average Nigga: Performing Race, Literacy, and Masculinity and co-author of Other People’s English: Code Meshing, Code Switching, and African American Literacy.

(Source: Campus events. Image source: University of Iowa)

 


6th Annual Edible Book Festival

THE MARK O. HATFIELD LIBRARY PRESENTS THE SIXTH ANNUAL EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL 

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, the Hatfield Library is pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by your favorite book, poem, character, or author—the only limit is your imagination.  Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible! Here are links to previous years’ entries (201620152014, 20132012).

Drop off your entries in the Hatfield Room on March 10 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible “book” between 8:00 a.m.-noon and 1:00-4:00 p.m.

At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—Michael Chasar, Monique Bourke, and Karla Gutierrez— will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Individual Student Entry
  • Best Student Group Entry
  • Most Literary
  • Most Creative
  • Punniest
  • People’s Choice

Light refreshments will be provided!

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715
cdrost@willamette.edu