Betty LaDuke Paintings

As you enter the Hatfield Library or walk through the Mary Stuart Rogers Music Center or Goudy Commons, you may notice new paintings on display.  These paintings are part of the collaborative exhibition, Betty LaDuke: Social Justice Revisited, presented by the Willamette University Archives and Special Collections and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art.

“Oregon artist and writer Betty LaDuke has gained an international reputation for her murals, paintings, and sketches. Her work tends to express socialist progress and life’s continuity, from images of America’s civil rights struggles, such as Play Free (1968), to women’s struggles for survival in war-ridden, spoiled lands, such as Eritrea/Ethiopia: Where Have All the Fathers Gone (1998).” – The Oregon Encyclopedia

The paintings will be on display throughout the fall semester.  The Archives holds LaDuke’s papers as a collection within the Pacific Northwest Artists Archives. The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Willamette University’s Green Fund provided through the Office of Sustainability. The four paintings below are on display in the Hatfield Library throughout the fall semester.

Additional information about Betty LaDuke, including events, books, videos, and websites can be found at:
http://libguides.willamette.edu/betty_laduke

 

  Eritrea:
Dreaming Home
2002
Eritrea:
Refugees Waiting
2002
Kosovo:
War Widows
2006
Mozambique:
Vanishing Rainforests
2009

New Art Acquisitions

The three artworks shown above are on loan from the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University.  Located at the corner of State Street and Cottage Street, the museum serves as a cultural and educational resource for the university, the city of Salem, and the entire Northwest region.

The selections on display represent recent acquisitions to the museum’s Northwest collection.  The museum collection focuses on art from the region — including deep holdings of modern and contemporary art from Oregon and Washington as well as an extensive Native American basket collection.  In addition, the museum has built a broad study collection of art from Ancient Mediterranean, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Oceania.

The artists represented in the Hatfield Library exhibition include three Northwest painters Alden Mason (Seattle), Jackie Johnson (Portland), and Bonnie Schulte (Salem).

Below are photos from the exhibit:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Squirrel Kidnapped

We currently have a mini-archives exhibit all about squirrels on display on the first floor of the library. There are tidbits of info about our infamous squirrels, including a petition that went to Governor McCall in the 1970s to declare the squirrels an endangered species near Willamette University and the Oregon State Capitol Building. Two separate Willamette Collegian articles are highlighted that accused Longview, Washington of stealing squirrels.  These two articles started the controversy surrounding the squirrel-napping.

Did you know that Willamette University’s squirrel population is made up of grey squirrels?  The grey squirrels were brought as a gift for the school in the 1880s.  Unfortunately, grey squirrels are an invasive species to the Pacific Northwest and displace red squirrels.  

Thank you Kate Kerns, intern in our Archives and Special Collections for pulling this exhibit together with materials from our Archives and Special Collections.

 

 


2017 Faculty Works Exhibit

The Mark O. Hatfield Library has on display a number of select faculty works now through May 15th, 2017.  These displays are are located on the first floor, and consist of a number of faculty publications (books and articles), and works of art (photos and studio art).  For the first time, there is also a display which highlight video clips of a theater production. Below are a photos from this exhibit.


Ralph Barnes Correspondence Exhibit

New Exhibit Going up in the Library on March 24th, 2017

UPDATE: The date for this mini exhibit has been delayed.  Additional information will follow as they become available.  (3-24-17)

This exhibit looks at the life and experiences of Ralph Barnes a Willamette University alumni from the class of 1922. Barnes was a foreign correspondent with the New York Herald Tribune. Ralph Barnes worked in Mussolini’s Italy, Joseph Stalin’s Russia, and Adolf Hitler’s Germany. Included in this exhibit are excerpts of Barnes foreign correspondence experience.  This exhibit has been put together by Kate Kerns, our Archives and Special Collections intern.


WU Rook Caps

Our Archives and Special Collections intern Kate Kerns has put together a special mini exhibit on the first floor of the library about Rook Caps based on the materials available in the Willamette University Archives and Special Collections.  This exhibit will be replaced later this week by a new exhibit by Kate Kern, so please take a look before these items are sent back into the archives.  Below are some photos of this fun exhibit, Rook Kaps worn at Willamette, a Rook Bible, photos, and stories that center around Rook Kaps. This is a good example of some of the fun things you can find in our Archives, and what could be learned about them.


Louis Bunce: Dialogue with Modernism Exhibit

January 21 – March 26, 2017

Melvin Henderson-Rubio Gallery

The Mark O. Hatfield Library will exhibit a few Modernism art works created by Portland artist Louis Bunce through March 26th, 2017.  Also included in this exhibit are a collection of books from our stacks on the topic of Modernism in the arts, all of which are available to check out.

(From the Hallie Ford Museum of Art’s blog post…)

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art is pleased to present a major retrospective exhibition for Louis Bunce (1907-1983), a legendary Portland painter, printmaker, and teacher who taught at the Museum Art School from 1946 to 1972 and who influenced several generations of Oregon artists. Organized by Professor Emeritus of Art History and Senior Faculty Curator Roger Hull, the exhibition will chronicle the artist’s career over a 57 year period and features 49 paintings drawn from public and private collections throughout the United States.

Hull says, “Bunce was Oregon’s archetypal modern artist of the mid-twentieth century. ‘Louie,’ as he was called, was ambitious, gregarious, fun-loving, women-loving, antic and outrageous. He was deadly serious when it came to art-making and engaged with it all: Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Post-Modernism, and at the end of his life almost operatic Romanticism.”

Born in Wyoming, Bunce moved with his family to Oregon in his youth, studied at the Museum Art School for a year, and moved to New York in the late 1920s to study at the Art Students League. At the League, he met Jackson Pollock, another Wyoming native, and they established an on-going friendship that lasted until Pollock’s death. In fact, it was Bunce who introduced Pollock to artist Lee Krasner, who would eventually become Pollock’s wife. Although Bunce returned to Portland, Oregon, he maintained strong ties with many other notable artists of the New York School throughout his career.

As a painter and printmaker, Bunce was a rising star in American art of the 1940s and 1950s. In painting, his WPA work from the 1930s gave way to inventive Surrealist forms in the 1940s, to nature-based abstract expressionist work in the 1950s and 1960s. He and his work were featured in a full-color article in Life magazine in 1957, and he was represented in New York by the John Heller Gallery and the Doris Meltzer Gallery. In the 1970s, he experimented with hard-edge geometric compositions and Pop-related imagery while his last works feature light-saturated seascapes.


Lausanne Hall Through the Years

Many students have lived in Lausanne Hall throughout the years, and in celebration of this landmark campus building we have a display with numerous photos and historical descriptions.  Below are some of the photos and description plates about Lausanne Hall which will be on display until May 15th.

l2Throughout Lausanne Hall’s History, she has had many names Woman’s College, Women’s College, Lausanne Hall, and the U.S.S. Lausanne.  And the name Lausanne has been used for three different buildings.

There are some fun quotes highlighting life in Lausanne Hall, such as from the Willamette Collegian, November 11, 1909: “No more fear from fire at the Hall now.  We have a new chemical fire extinguisher and a chain-ladder fire escape. ”  Then a week later in the Collegian, “Lausanne Hall was saved from destruction by fire last Saturday by gallant efforts of Messrs. Oakes, Anderson and Booth.  As is the case with boys, they visited the kitchen afterwards.”

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In 1918, the old Lausanne Hall was condemned, and a song was made about its languishing condition: “There’s an old historic building, Fames in story and in song. Where the Westland’s fairest daughters Linger: may they linger long.  Old Lausanne may not look splendid, Its appearance don’t deride, it is some majestic ruin, When you view it from the inside.  (Second Chorus) Through insurance underwriters Think its fire risk is too great To Protect it by insurance. Yet it’s here we want to state Thought they call it an “Old Firetrap…”

In October of 1919, the old Lausanne Hall was razed by the Willamette “boys” and finished by professional workmen.  The old Music Building at Willamette was remodeled and temporarily used for housing for the young women at Willamette while the new home was being built.

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As World War II rolled around, in December of 1942 the Board of Trustees approved a plan to offer Lausanne Hall as a men’s dormitory in the event Willamette was selected as a site for a Navy or Army training unit for World War II.  In April, 1943, Willamette was selected as a site to offer the V-12 naval program and plans are made to house 150 men in Lausanne, and a few months later in July 270 men reported to Willamette University’s naval headquarters (Gatke Hall). In October 1945, the V-12 Navy program comes to an end.

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Youth Leadership Month

Our current display of books and DVDs are centered around Youth Leadership Month.  There are books and videos that feature strong leaders as the main characters, historical movers and shakers, as well as materials to brush up leadership skills.

All of these materials are available to check out, as always!

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Thompson Exhibit

James B. Thompson: Fragments In Timejames-thompson1

January 23 – March 26, 2016

The Mark O. Hatfield Library has some art pieces by James B. Thompson on display on the first floor of the library.  This is in conjunction with the current exhibit by Thompson in the Hallie Ford Museum of Art.

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art presents a twenty-year retrospective exhibition, “Fragments in Time,” by Willamette University’s art faculty member James B. Thompson in the Melvin Henderson-Rubio Gallery.

“Fragments in Time” explores the development of Thompson’s work during thejames-thompson3 past two decades, and features 179 artworks that range through 11 series, starting with Thompson’s “Certain Situations” from the mid-1990s, to his most recent “Forgotten Biography of Tools” from 2015. Utilizing various mediums — including mixed-media, painting, intaglio prints, embossed paper and kiln-formed glass — Thompson focuses on his various interests in ancient history, golf, changing landscapes, life in a French village and even hand tools, by incorporating  fragmented references to these in his art making process.

Portland, Oregon art writer and critic Bob Hicks says, “In keeping with his theory of a fragmented universe, Thompson creates situations in his art, but not stories: juxtapositions, suggestions, leftover objects and ideas. Then like a collagist of objects and ideas alike, he creates something new.”

In addition to the objects on display in the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, the exhibition is accompanied by a full-color, 128 page book by Portland, Oregon art writer and critic Bob Hicks.

james-thompson4The images included on this page are just a few items on display in the Hatfield Library, which includes a selection of related books from the library’s general collection (books on display can be checked out).

More information is available on the Hallie Ford Museum of Art web site:
https://willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2015-16/james_b_thompson.html

 

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