Hallie Ford Literary Series, David Shields

Please join us for the first event of the Spring 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by acclaimed essayist David Shields on Thursday, February 2, at 7:30 p.m. The event takes place in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s Hatfield Library and is free and open to the public. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

David Shields is the internationally bestselling author of twenty books, including Reality Hunger: A Manifesto (named one of the best books of 2010 by more than thirty publications), The Thing About Life Is That One Day You’ll Be Dead (New York Times bestseller), and Black Planet (finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award). Just published is War Is Beautiful (powerHouse, November 2015), a critical examination of war photography in the New York Times. His newest book, Other People: Takes & Mistakes, is forthcoming from Knopf in February 2017. The recipient of Guggenheim and NEA fellowships, Shields has published essays and stories in the New York Times MagazineHarper’sEsquireYale ReviewVillage VoiceSalonSlateMcSweeney’s, and Believer. His work has been translated into twenty languages.

In his review of Reality Hunger in the New York TimesLuc Sante calls Shields “a benevolent and broad-minded revolutionary, urging a hundred flowers to bloom, toppling only the outmoded and corrupt institutions. His book may not presage sweeping changes in the immediate future, but it probably heralds what will be the dominant modes in years and decades to come.”

Read the whole review here: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/14/books/review/Sante-t.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Or watch David interviewed by Stephen Colbert here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/15/stephen-colbert-author-in_n_538869.html


Faculty Colloquium: Maegan Parker Brooks

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this week, Friday, January 27th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our first Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Maegan Parker Brooks
, Assistant Professor of Civic Communication and Media
 
Title:  Emmett’s Life Matters: Enthymematic Reasoning and Memetic Representation in Contemporary Public Discourse

The name, the face, and the story of Emmett Till, the black teenager who was lynched in 1955 for allegedly whistling at a white woman, are reemerging in America’s collective consciousness. This presentation will consider how the figure of Till figures within contemporary verbal and visual media. I will examine popular newspaper and magazine articles, as well as widely-circulated memes, explicating their implicit social knowledge premises in relation to three audience groups. For contemporary activists, establishing connections between Till, the mid-twentieth century Black Freedom Movement, and America’s current racial climate offers direction to a nascent movement. For experientially external yet sympathetic audiences, evoking the Till tragedy provides form and substance to the abstract condition of mourning endured by blacks in America. For those external and previously disinterested audiences, memes visually linking Till to the contemporary deaths of unarmed black youth create dialectical tensions which hold the affective capacity to stimulate an acknowledgment of how post-racial inaction perpetuates entrenched patterns of injustice.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Sarah Bishop

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Sarah Clovis Bishop, Associate Professor of Russian, will talk at this Friday’s Faculty Colloquium on Performing the Poet: Elena Shvarts’s “The Visible Side of Life.” Dec. 2nd @ 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room. Treats will be provided.

In 2010, director Boris Pavlovich and actress Yana Savitskaya created and staged The Visible Side of Life, a one-woman show based on the prose and poetry of Elena Shvarts (1948-2010), a central figure in late Soviet and post-Soviet Russian literature. Then based in Kirov, Russia at the “Theater on Spasskaya,” Savitskaya and Pavlovich had been exploring Shvarts’s verse for over a year, delving into her autobiographical prose to understand it more fully. Just as they were ready to approach the poet about their work, they learned of her death. They abandoned their poetic etudes and turned instead to a dramatic work in which they imagined the last hours of the poet’s life. Pavlovich has described it as a “quasi-biography”; an image of “our Elena Shvarts whom we failed to meet.”

The performance has since traveled to St. Petersburg, Shvarts’s home, and is now part of the repertory at the Bolshoi Drama Theater (BDT). Most recently, the show received its American premiere at Princeton, Harvard, and right here at Willamette. I will discuss the performance in its various incarnations, highlighting the many boundaries that it tests–between reality and fantasy; the visible and invisible; prose and poetry; performer and audience.

All are invited to attend this talk. We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Rethinking the Oregon Story

Please join us this week, Friday, November 18th at 3 pm. in the foss_smHatfield Room for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Christopher Foss
, Adjunct Professor, Tokyo International University of America
 

Title:  Rethinking the Oregon Story: The Importance of International Affairs to Oregon’s Political History Since World War II

Oregon’s political history has traditionally been summed up by a self-confident, even triumphal, phrase: “The Oregon Story”.  In the narrative expounded by proponents of The Oregon Story, visionary political leaders—particularly Governors Tom McCall and Robert Straub—and a variety of like-minded grassroots politicians and activists saved post-World War II Oregon from the urban decay and environmental degradation that plagued many other states.  My work argues, by contrast, that the real Oregon story had less to do with innovations within the state, and more to do with the state’s relationship to the world.  By refocusing Oregon’s political history on elected officials who were active in international affairs, and by analyzing patterns of defense spending, trade, and immigration, this project encourages us to reconceive the Oregon story beyond state—and even national—boundaries.  I contend that after World War II, Oregon became not only a more livable state thanks to McCall and Straub, but, perhaps surprisingly, a more economically and culturally diverse place, thanks to a new focus by its civic, business, and community leaders on the ways it is interconnected with the globe.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Annual Tree of Giving Book Drive

The annual Tree of Giving Book Drive has officially begun.

The Hatfield Library, The Willamette Store and the Bistro are seeking donations of new or slightly used children’s books to be donated to Swegle Elementary School‘s library. We also encourage you to donate hats, gloves and scarves for students at Swegle.

The last day to donate is Tuesday, December 20. Items can be dropped off at The Willamette Store, Hatfield Library, Bistro or Sparks Athletic Center.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask. Attached is an image of the poster for distribution on social media.

Thank you for your support!

 

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(Update January 4th, 2017)

Thank you for your support of the 2016 Tree of Giving Book Drive sponsored by the Mark O. Hatfield Library, the Willamette Store and the Bistro. We collected 171 books, 20 pairs of gloves, 6 scarves and 4 hats. The books will be added to Swegle Elementary School’s library and the gloves, scarves and hats will be distributed by the employees and teachers to students in need.

Again, thank you for your continued support and we look forward to the 2017 book drive.


Faculty Colloquium: Doing Data Science

chengsmPlease join us tomorrow, Friday, November 4th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Haiyan Cheng
, Associate Professor of Computer Science
 
Title:  Doing Data Science

Computational Science and Engineering combines theory and experiments for scientific discovery. It is interdisciplinary in nature, requiring subject knowledge in 1) applied discipline, 2) mathematics and 3) computer science. With the evolutionary extension of statistics capable of dealing with the massive amount of data produced today, data science has becoming the new trend, and it helped scientific discovery extending from natural science to humanities and social sciences.

My research deals with designing new computational algorithms to make forecast models more accurate. Specifically, I optimally combine observational data with the model forecast data through a method called “Data Assimilation”.

In this talk, I will report how the amount of available observational data has changed and inspired my research. I will report two of my sabbatical projects that involving hands-on data science. The first one is my experience participating a Datathon (an intensive programming competition) at a computational social science conference; using social media data to answer U.S. election related questions. The second one is my experience participating a one-week workshop, using real criminal data to infer networks for predictive policing.

Finally, I will talk about the basics in doing data science and introduce commonly used tools.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium, Ivan Welty

Please join us this Friday, September 16th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Ivan Welty, Associate Professor of Philosophy

Title: My Semester in Hanoi

Abstract: Last year I spent 6 months in Hanoi as a Fulbright US Scholar. In this talk, I’ll describe the experience, concentrating on (1) the current scene in Vietnam as I came to understand it; (2) tips for colleagues weighing their own Fulbright applications, including practical matters like housing and children’s schooling; and (3) possibilities for future collaboration and exchange with partners in Vietnam. So my aim is both to report my experience and to arouse interest at Willamette in Fulbright and Vietnam.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.


Alumni Weekend Events

We have a few events that will be held in the Hatfield Library during Alumni Weekend, Sept 22-25.  All are invited to attend and participate, and we hope to see you there! The link to the full schedule is:
http://willamette.edu/alumni/activities/alumni_weekend/schedule/index.html

FRIDAY, Sept 23rd

HATFIELD LIBRARY TOUR

9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
Join alumni for a tour of the Hatfield Library and a special presentation from University Archives. Stick around after the tour for the session, “Willamette’s Political Papers Collection.”
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Circulation Desk (1st Floor)

 

WILLAMETTE’S POLITICAL PAPERS COLLECTION
10:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Willamette University has a long tradition of educating politically and civically engaged leaders. But did you know WU’s Archives and Special Collections has a significant Political Archive documenting some of the most important regional and national legislation of the late 20th century? Join the Politics Department and Archives Department for a conversation centering on significant environmental legislation with former U.S. congressional leaders including Mike Kopetski and Bob Packwood ’54 (whose congressional papers are housed in WU’s archives) and learn why these collections are invaluable in helping us tell our collective story.
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

 

THE EVOLUTION OF WILLAMETTE’S ARCHITECTURAL AND NATURAL LANDSCAPE
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
Curious to know how Willamette’s campus evolved from a single building in a field to the beautiful setting we appreciate today? Come hear public historian Dr. William F. Willingham ’66 as he shares information that he has accumulated while researching Willamette’s architectural and natural landscape for his forthcoming book on the subject.
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

FRIDAY, Sept 23rd

THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF ELECTIONS AMERICAN STYLE
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Join Professor Melissa Michaux, Politics, for this discussion: Elections are supposed to be the vehicle to transcribe voter preferences into action, set an agenda for a governing majority and reassure Americans that we live in a democracy where the will of the people are expressed. Many features of modern American elections make these goals difficult. What should voters expect from American elections? What are they likely to get?
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

 


Fall Semester Hours

We will continue our shortened building hours throughout the week of August 22nd (8 am – 5 pm).  On Saturday we will be open 10-4pm, but closed all day Sunday.  Monday, August 29, the first day of class, our hours will extend to 8 am – Midnight.

Our full semester hours will begin Monday, August 5th (7:45 am – 2 am) weekdays, Saturdays (10 am – 9 pm), and Sundays (10 am – 2 am).

Details at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar/

 

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(Image source: Pixabay.com)


Welcome (Back)

Welcome to the Mark O. Hatfield Library, for those who are new to our library.  And welcome back for those who are returning!  We are ready for your return, and hope you’re ready to come back.  As you probably already know, we have top notch librarians to help with your upcoming research, plus excellent tools and resources.

Here is a link to get to a page that will help orient you to our library, or refresh your knowledge.  (And for the record, several Pokemon have been found in and around the library!)