Oregon Coast and Highway History

The Oregon Coast is filled with unexpected history. Prior to World War I, most of the Oregon coast was inaccessible. As a response to World War I and perceived need for emergency preparedness, the concept of the Roosevelt Coast Military Highway was created and named in honor of President Theodore Roosevelt.

In 1919, Oregon voters approved the sale of $2.5 million in bonds for the project, but matching federal funds failed to materialize. But Oregonians still wanted access to the coasts, so the Oregon’s Highway Department began work on 400 miles worth of road, bridges, and tunnels in 1921 and continued through the 1920s & 30s. The road became U.S. 101 in 1926 and then renamed in 1931 as the Oregon Coast Highway.

This is also the 50th anniversary of Oregon’s Beach Bill which was signed into law on July 6, 1967 to safeguard beaches from development.  Our beloved coast could look much different had the bill failed and a few private developers won. Thankfully as Oregonians began to hear what they stood to lose, the trickle of public support turned into a tidal wave.  After months of  battle, the bill was signed into law.  And the rest is history.  Your experience of our wonderful Oregon Coast line and access to the miles of beach that people around the world come to visit is a direct result from this important legislative bill.  Know that our beautiful beach is for the public to treasure and protect.  Forever!

Below are just a few of the dozens of images from the Oregon Encyclopedia that describe the history of Highway 101, the Oregon Coast Highway (https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/highway_101_oregon_coast_highway_/#.WWOvVojyuUk).  The following link also goes to a page of activities and events connected to the Oregon’s Beach Bill (http://visittheoregoncoast.com/oregon-beach-bill-50th-anniversary-celebration).

   
 
   
   

Closed Fourth of July

This is just a quick reminder that our library, as well as the entire campus, will be closed in observance for the 4th of July.  We well be open the day before (Monday) and the day after (Wednesday) with our normal hours.  Details available at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar


New Art Acquisitions

The three artworks shown above are on loan from the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University.  Located at the corner of State Street and Cottage Street, the museum serves as a cultural and educational resource for the university, the city of Salem, and the entire Northwest region.

The selections on display represent recent acquisitions to the museum’s Northwest collection.  The museum collection focuses on art from the region — including deep holdings of modern and contemporary art from Oregon and Washington as well as an extensive Native American basket collection.  In addition, the museum has built a broad study collection of art from Ancient Mediterranean, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Oceania.

The artists represented in the Hatfield Library exhibition include three Northwest painters Alden Mason (Seattle), Jackie Johnson (Portland), and Bonnie Schulte (Salem).

Below are photos from the exhibit:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Squirrel Kidnapped

We currently have a mini-archives exhibit all about squirrels on display on the first floor of the library. There are tidbits of info about our infamous squirrels, including a petition that went to Governor McCall in the 1970s to declare the squirrels an endangered species near Willamette University and the Oregon State Capitol Building. Two separate Willamette Collegian articles are highlighted that accused Longview, Washington of stealing squirrels.  These two articles started the controversy surrounding the squirrel-napping.

Did you know that Willamette University’s squirrel population is made up of grey squirrels?  The grey squirrels were brought as a gift for the school in the 1880s.  Unfortunately, grey squirrels are an invasive species to the Pacific Northwest and displace red squirrels.  

Thank you Kate Kerns, intern in our Archives and Special Collections for pulling this exhibit together with materials from our Archives and Special Collections.

 

 


Faculty Colloquium, Seth Cotlar

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 28th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our tenth and final Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Seth Cotlar, Professor of History
 

Title:  What the Nostalgic Subject Knows: Nostalgia, the Nineteenth Century Archive, and the Melancholy History of Modernization in Antebellum America

This talk will be drawn from my ongoing book project entitled “When The Olden Days Were New: A Cultural History of Nostalgia in Modernizing America, 1776-1860.”   In the 1820s and 1830s there emerged a new category of people–self-described “antiquaries” and lovers of “the olden times.”  By the 1840s, just about every town or county had a small community of quirky amateur historians.  These librarians, bank clerks, widows, and lawyers collected old books and manuscripts, hoarded old tools and objects, donned “old fashioned” clothing, filled their houses with anachronistic furniture, drew sketches of old houses before they were about to be torn down, and regaled anyone who would listen with stories from “the olden days” that they had gleaned from their conversations with local octogenarians.  In an era when most of their contemporaries could have cared less about history (Independence Hall, for example, was almost torn down and replaced with a more modern building in the 1820s), this community of eccentrics produced hundreds of local histories (such as this gripping, 400+ page history of Newbury, Newburyport, and West Newbury) and founded dozens of historical societies.  This work matters, because the material they collected formed the foundation of the modern historical archive that we now use to reconstruct the history of early North America. In this talk, I will critically interrogate the nostalgic impulses that animated this work of recovery and preservation.  For the most part, these builders of the archive have been looked down upon, if not entirely ignored, by professional historians because of their unseemly, melancholy attachment to objects and documents from the “obsolete” past.  Their emotional investment in their work disqualified them as “serious” scholars for a profession eager to define itself as rigorously modern and empirical.  But I argue that the melancholy, nostalgic sensibility of these early nineteenth century historians is precisely what enabled them to see certain features of the American past that many of their more forward-looking contemporaries wished to forget.  Indeed, we are now able to tell more capacious and creative histories of early America today, in part, because of the radically inclusive work of preservation carried out by this first generation of nostalgic hoarders, and eccentric lovers of “the olden times.”

Students are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Lecture by Gordon-Reed and Onuf

The History Department invites you to attend a lecture by historians Annette Gordon-Reed, Professor at Harvard Law School and Pulitzer-Prize Winning author of The Hemingses of Monticello, and Peter Onuf, UVA emeritus, founder of the Backstory! Podcast, and author of numerous books on Thomas Jefferson.  The talk will take place on Monday April 24 at 7pm in the Hatfield Room.

Gordon-Reed and Onuf will give a talk based on their recently published and widely-acclaimed book “The Most Blessed of the Patriarchs: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination.”  We hope to see you there!

For questions about this lecture, please contact Seth Cotlar (scotlar@willamette.edu) from the History Department.


2017 Faculty Works Exhibit

The Mark O. Hatfield Library has on display a number of select faculty works now through May 15th, 2017.  These displays are are located on the first floor, and consist of a number of faculty publications (books and articles), and works of art (photos and studio art).  For the first time, there is also a display which highlight video clips of a theater production. Below are a photos from this exhibit.


Foundational Scientific Reasoning

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 21st at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Courtney Stevens and Melissa Witkow, Associate Professors of Psychology,
 

Title:  Promoting foundational scientific reasoning skills in Introductory Psychology: Findings from an NSF-IUSE curriculum grant

In this talk, we will describe our collaborative work over the past 5 years to develop and assess new materials to improve the training of scientific reasoning skills in introductory psychology.  This work was initially inspired by changes to the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) to include psychology-focused questions. These questions highlighted the potential for introductory psychology to move beyond traditional content coverage to include stronger training of scientific reasoning skills, including data interpretation and research design. Our talk will cover a series of studies, moving from initial efforts in our own classes at Willamette to broader efforts involving other instructors at WU, as well as Chemeketa Community College and Oregon State University. The talk will highlight the course modules and assessment results, as well our design process. This work was funded by a Keck grant (iScience; PIs: Mark Stewart and Stas Stavrianeas) and an NSF-IUSE grant (PIs: Courtney Stevens, Melissa Witkow, and Kathy Becker-Blease).

Students are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

 

Professor Parayil

Tuesday April 18, 4:15 in the Library’s Hatfield Room,  Prof. Govindan Parayil will give the 2017 Teppola Chair lecture on “The Return of ‘the Machinery Question’ and the Failed Promise of Globalization.”
Abstract: Political economists and social critics of the 19th century theorized “the machinery question”: the rage against machines by unemployed former artisans and alienated workers after the onset of modern capitalism. Two centuries later, resistance to the “march of the machine” has returned.  Whereas the Luddites in the 19th century English mills attacked textile machines as tangible instruments of their oppression, information-age revolts rage against the post-Cold War global political and economic order. There is public anxiety and fear that the twin forces of globalization and technological innovation are forging an economic future in which most work will be done by autonomous technologies.  Looming in scholarly debates and public discourse is the prospect of a dystopia worse than the one Charlie Chaplin portrayed in the film “Modern Times,” that is, an economic marketplace where humans need not apply.  In Bill Joy’s words, we fear a future “that doesn’t need us.”  In this talk, I will investigate whether, as several major technological advances revolutionize the world’s political economy, it is possible to have a fair economic future in the face of gross asymmetries in social relations, political power, and economic opportunities for the marginalized and excluded majority.

WU Alumni Publications

The Willamette University Alumni Publication collection comes from the University Archives & Records collection area, which contains publications, images, administrative records, research materials, and scrapbooks dating from Willamette’s beginnings.

It includes the Willamette University Bulletin (1919); The Willamette Alumni Magazine (1922-1923); The Willamette Alumni Bulletin (June, 1925); The Willamette University Alumnus (1926-1970); The Willamette Scene (April 1967 – Spring 2014); The Willamette Magazine (Fall 2014 – Summer 2016)

Also available are materials relating to Freshman Glee, one of Willamette’s longest running – and most beloved – traditions. This collection can be browsed or searched.

http://libmedia.willamette.edu/commons/collec/102