Black History Month

This month we have a selection of books and movies on display on the first floor of the library that celebrate Black History Month.  Black History Month began as a way to remember important people and events of African diaspora, and was initially proposed by black educators and students at Kent State University in February of 1969.

When President Gerald Ford recognized Black History Month during the celebration of the U.S. Bicentennial in 1976, recognition of it took hold across the country, particularly in educational institutions.  It now incorporates important people and events of the American Civil Rights Movement as well, such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the Selma to Montgomery marches.  So come “check out” our selection of books and videos at our Black History Month display!


2017 Tree of Giving Wrap up

Update on the Tree of Giving Book Drive

Thank you so much for participating in this year’s Tree of Giving Book Drive.  We have officially wrapped up for this year, and Four Corners Elementary was the beneficiary this year.  Together we collected 181 books (including five Spanish-language books), 28 gloves, 15 hats, and 4 scarfs.  We also want to thank all of our drop off locations: The Willamette Store who also provided a 30% discount on books purchased for the Tree of Giving, the Bistro, Law Library, and Sparks Athletic Center.

Additional info is available at: https://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving. For questions about this event, please contact John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu) or Michael Smith (msmith@willamette.edu).

Below are a few photos of the book donations given to Four Corners Elementary School.  Thank you again for all of your wonderful support!


Tree of Giving 2017

This year’s Tree of Giving Book Drive will benefit Four Corners Elementary.

We are seeking donations of new or slightly used children’s books to be donated to library of Four Corners Elementary School. We also encourage clothing donations such as hats, gloves and scarves for students at Four Corners.

Some ideas for book donate (both Spanish & English) are Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Pokemon, Amulet, Dork Diaries, Weird But True, and books about Legos to name a few.  Additional details about this program are available at:

https://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving.

The last day to donate is Friday, December 15. Items can be dropped off at The Willamette Store, Hatfield Library, Law Library, Bistro, Sparks Athletic Center, and Pi Beta Phi.

If you have any questions, please contact John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu) or Michael Smith (msmith@willamette.edu). Below is the poster used on our social media sites.

Thank you for your support!

 


Schatz and Stahl Book Talk

Dear colleagues,

Please join us in the Hatfield Room at 4:30 on Wednesday 11/29 as Kate Schatz and Miriam Klein Stahl share their bestselling children’s books, Rad American Women A to Z and Rad Women Worldwide, and discuss “how to be rad in difficult times.” This event is free and open to the public, and it’s family friendly. We’ll have coffee and cookies, and the Willamette store will have books available for purchase. A book signing will follow the discussion.

This event is sponsored by Civic Communication and Media department, with significant support from Willamette’s Mellon-funded Learning By Creating initiative.

During their Willamette visit, Schatz and Klein Stahl will also lead a half-day workshop for students in CCM/AES/WGS 342, my course on U.S. Women’s Activism Since 1920. The workshop will support students’ collaborative project: a collection of visual portraits, biographies, and critical essays designed to enrich public understanding of women’s contributions to American life.  In addition, students will interview Schatz and Klein Stahl for the KMUZ radio show Worldviews Wednesdays, as part of the La Chispa project led by Professor Catalina de Onís.

About the speakers:

Kate Schatz is the New York Times-bestselling author of Rad American Women A-Z and Rad Women Worldwide. She’s a writer, editor, and educator, who’s been passionate about both writing and politics since she was a kid. She’s a co-founder of Solidarity Sundays, a nationwide network of feminist activist groups, and she lives with her family on the island of Alameda.

Miriam Klein Stahl is a Bay Area artist, educator and activist. In addition to her work in printmaking, drawing, sculpture, paper-cut and public art, she is also the co-founder of the Arts and Humanities Academy at Berkeley High School where she’s taught since 1995. As an artist, she follows in a tradition of making socially relevant work, creating portraits of political activists, misfits, radicals and radical movements. As an educator, she has dedicated her teaching practice to address equity through the lens of the arts. Her work has been widely exhibited and reproduced internationally. She lives in Berkeley, California with her wife, artist Lena Wolff, daughter Hazel, and their dog Lenny.

A Facebook page for the event is available at: https://www.facebook.com/events/140523173385824/


Tommy Pico Reading

Please join us for the final event of the Fall 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by Tommy Pico. The reading will take place on Tuesday, November 14th, at 7:00 p.m. in the Hatfield Room (2nd floor of Hatfield Library) and is free and open to the public.

Tommy “Teebs” Pico is author of the books IRL (Birds, LLC, 2016), Nature Poem (Tin House Books, 2017), and Junk (forthcoming 2018 from Tin House Books). He was a Queer/Art/Mentors inaugural fellow, 2013 Lambda Literary fellow in poetry, a 2017 NYSCA/NYFA Fellow in Poetry from the New York Foundation for the Arts, and has been profiled in Fusion, Nylon, and the New Yorker. Originally from the Viejas Indian reservation of the Kumeyaay nation, he now lives in Brooklyn where he co-curates the reading series Poets With Attitude (PWA) with Morgan Parker at the Ace Hotel, co-hosts the podcast Food 4 Thot, and is a contributing editor at Literary Hub. @heyteebs

To give you a sense of his work, you’ll find a brief but descriptive review of Pico’s second collection, Nature Poem, from Publishers Weekly below:

“Pico (IRL) centers his second book-length poem on the trap of conforming to identity stereotypes as he ponders his reluctance to write about nature as a Native American. This is “fodder for the noble savage/ narrative,” he writes as ignorant people ask, “do I feel more connected to nature/ bc I’m NDN.” Other similarly problematic expectations are wryly discussed: “An NDN poem must reference alcoholism, like// I started drinking again after Mike Brown and Sandra Bland and CharlestonI felt so underwater it made no sense to keep dry.” As an extension of this dilemma, Pico poses questions about what is natural human behavior: Is it natural for a football player to assault his girlfriend? Is colonialism natural? What about the feeling one gets while listening to Beyoncé’s “Mine”? Pico’s alter-ego “Teebs” remains in constant motion, leaping from the dentist’s office to drag queen karaoke night to the movie theater: “I’m an adult I only let myself have/ candy at the movies/ so I’ve been going to the movies A LOT.” In making the subliminal overt, Pico reclaims power by calling out microaggressions and drawing attention to himself in the face of oppression, “the way the only thing more obvious than your body/ is leaving yr shirt on in the pool.” (May)

https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-941040-63-8

If you have any questions about the event, please contact Danielle Deulen at dcdeulen@willamette.edu.


Gaetano DeLeonibus, Faculty Colloquium

Gaetano DeLeonibus

Please join us next Friday, October 27, at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester and the second in our Pedagogy/Digital Humanities series.

Presenter: Gaetano DeLeonibus, Professor of French and Francophone Studies
Title: “Digitizing André Breton’s 17th-Century Carib-French Dictionary”

I attended a week-long intensive workshop (June 5-9, 2017), “Text Encoding Fundamentals and their Application,” an introduction to the theory and practice of encoding texts for the humanities. More specifically, the workshop introduced the non-initiate to the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding original texts in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. During the workshop, I began to encode several pages of a 17th-century Carib-French dictionary with the XML Editor Oxygen.

This presentation will first give an overview of Breton’s dictionary, then delve into my experience at the workshop, and describe the use I’ve been making of the text and project in FREN 336.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Brightly Dawning Day

You are invited to a staged reading of the latest iteration of Brightly Dawning Day, a play originally devised by the faculty and students of the department of Theatre, in consultation with Professor Chasar and his students, during the 2012-2013 season.

The play celebrates the life of Abigail Scott Duniway and her fight to gain Oregon women the right to vote. The play is equal parts performance piece, pop-culture mashup, and history play, and is a lot of fun!  The reading will run approximately 60 minutes, and will be followed by a script development talkback.

This will be in the Hatfield Room and will start at 7 pm THIS WEDNESDAY, 10/25.

Additional details and photos are available at:

Literary Reading with Mike Scalise

Please join us for the second event of the Fall 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by Mike Scalise.  The reading will take place on Tuesday, October 24th, at 7:00 p.m. in the Hatfield Room (2nd floor of Hatfield Library) and is free and open to the public.

Scalise’s memoir, The Brand New Catastrophe, was the recipient of the Center for Fiction’s 2014 Christopher Doheny Award.  Scalise’s story begins when a ruptured pituitary tumor leaves him with the hormone disorder acromegaly at age 24, and he must navigate a new, alien world of illness maintenance. His mother, who has a chronic heart condition and a flair for drama, serves as a complicated model. Ultimately, it is a moving, funny exploration of how we define ourselves by the stories we choose to tell.

Mike Scalise’s work has appeared in the New York TimesWall Street Journal, Agni, Indiewire, Ninth Letter, Paris Review Daily, and other places.  He is an 826DC advisory board member, has received fellowships and scholarships from Bread Loaf, Yaddo, and the Ucross Foundation, and was the Philip Roth Writer in Residence at Bucknell University.

PRAISE FOR THE BRAND NEW CATASTROPHE:

“His way is with humor, optimism, courage and probing introspection, the very characteristics—combined with crisp prose and a rare and innately interesting medical condition—that make this a winning literary debut.” —The New York Times Book Review

“An offbeat, witty memoir. . . Scalise is unsparing in recounting his reaction to his diagnosis while keeping the reader engaged in a story about catastrophe. . . Sensitive and well-written.”
Publishers Weekly

“In his memoir The Brand New Catastrophe, Mike Scalise meditates with crackling wit and self-awareness on chronic illness, family, and the clichés of catastrophe stories.”—Kenyon Review

“The effects of illness on self-image and its gravitational pull on family, friends, and spouse are touchingly detailed in this upbeat health memoir.” Booklist review

“Despite the seriousness of the subject, The Brand New Catastrophe manages to be as funny as it is smart about mortality, the fragility of our bodies, and understanding the worst things that happen to us.”—Buzzfeed Books

“The Brand New Catastrophe reveals the human experience of acromegaly with a beautiful and skillful clarity, rendering the rare and misunderstood disorder with an intimate, personal grace.” —Literary Hub

Image source: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6873239.Mike_Scalise

 


Eunice Parsons Papers

Eunice Parsons was born in 1916 in Loma, Colorado but spent most of her young life in Chicago. When she was a young girl, she attended children’s classes at the University of Chicago where she learned an appreciation for art, as well as the skills that would allow her to pursue a career in the field later in life. After graduating high school, Parsons attended a few art classes from the University of Chicago. Soon after, Parsons married and moved to Portland along with her new husband. She spent the next two decades as a working mother. In the 1940s she began taking classes at the Portland Museum Art School. Shortly after, in 1957, she took a trip to New York to acquaint and immerse herself in the culture of art. Parsons took a sketchbook where she made exhaustive notes and depicted many landscapes. This notebook showcases her earliest inclinations in playing with color, line, and shading, all developing into a unique and distinctive style. After returning from New York, Parsons continued her career as an artist and eventually began teaching at the Portland Museum Art School. While teaching, she became notorious as a blunt but brilliant instructor and would lead numerous student trips to Europe and the birthplaces of western art. In 2006 Parsons, along with others, was instrumental in opening the 12×16 Gallery in Portland. In 2017 she continues to be an influential and prolific artist at the age of 100.

The Eunice Parsons papers encompass not only Eunice Parsons’ long and influential career as a Portland artist, but also the inner workings of the Portland art community from the early 1950s through to the present day. It contains Parsons’ manuscripts from her endeavors as an author, fliers from a variety of Portland artists, photographs and slides from her teaching career, samples of her art and sketchbooks, professional papers, and a great wealth of correspondence in the form of Christmas cards from many of the most famous Portland artists.

For additional information about this collection, visit:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/5012

Also, view the online exhibit of a few selected sketch books: exhibit by the same intern who processed her collection:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/archives/omeka/exhibits/show/matriarchofmodernism/introduction

Note: The Eunice Parsons papers collection was processed and the exhibition created by McKelvey Mandigo-Stoba, Willamette University ’17, during an Archives & Special Collections Internship.

 


Zotero – Citation Tool

This past year, the Hatfield Library replaced RefWorks with Zotero. This is the first semester that we have been actively teaching the Willamette community how to install and use Zotero.

Zotero is a free citation tool that helps you cite, manage, and share your literature research. You can install a browser extension (available for Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Explorer–it sometimes has problems with Safari) and work entirely with the online version of Zotero.  You can also download the desktop version which embeds itself within MS Word and works with the browser extension (we suggest downloading both desktop and browser extension).   You can also drag and drop citations into Google Docs from the desktop Zotero.

It work with both Macs, PCs, and Linux. While there is a little learning curve, it is fairly easy to catch on. Zotero is a powerful and handy tool for any academic researcher, and will serve you well in you academic and professional career.

For additional information, such as installation instructions and a video tutorial, visit http://libguides.willamette.edu/zotero.

For questions about Zotero or to setup an appointment to learn more, contact Bill Kelm (bkelm@willamette.edu) or John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu)