Sufism and Islamic Law Lecture

Sufism and Islamic Law: Tempering Legal Decision Making with the Jurist’s Knowledge of God

A lecture by Fareeha Khan

Thursday, October 4, 5 pm
Hatfield Room
Mark O. Hatfield Library

Sufism was as much a part of the life and blood of Muslim societies as Islamic law in pre-modern times. On a daily basis, it was what reminded both the lay and scholar Muslim what the point was in following Islamic legal rulings:  to worship and submit oneself to God. Unfortunately, due to various modern intellectual trends, Sufism no longer holds such a central level of importance among many of today’s Muslims. This lecture will examine a prominent modern-day case of Islamic legal reform in which the motivating factor was the jurist’s deep spirituality and practice of Sufism. I argue that a revival of such spiritually-inspired jurisprudence is necessary for the holistic survival of Islam in the modern day.

Fareeha Khan is an independent scholar affiliated with Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. Her research interests include Islamic law, gender, and the place of traditional Islamic scholarship in the modern day. She is the author of several academic articles, is currently serving as Advisory Editor for the Oxford Encyclopedia of Islamic Law, and is preparing her first book-length manuscript for publication, entitled The Ethical Contours of a Fatwa: Gender, Sufism and Islamic Law in Late Colonial India. Dr. Khan currently resides in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

The Facebook event page is here.  This event is sponsored by Willamette University’s Religious Studies Department, and is free and open to the public.


2018 MOHL Research Awards

The Hatfield Library is pleased to announce the winners of our MOHL Research Award.  The award is given for a student paper in any discipline that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources.  The paper must have been written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work.  Up to two awards are given each year and winners receive $500.

The winners for 2018 are:

Kelly Ewing for her paper “Including Indigenous Voices in Water Management: A Comparison of Australian And American Approaches.” (Faculty Supporter: Karen Arabas)

Cole Franko for his paper “Marx and the Mir: A Critical Look at the Evolution of Historical Materialism.” (Faculty Supporter: Bill Smaldone)

Congratulations to Kelly and Cole for their outstanding work!  And please keep your eye out for excellent papers that would be good candidates for the 2019 MOHL Research Award.  Also, many thanks to Gretchen Moon, Joni Roberts, and the Hatfield Librarians for serving on the adjudication committee for the award.

Craig Milberg
University Librarian
Mark O. Hatfield Library
Willamette University

 


Wittenberg to Willamette

From Wittenberg to Willamette:  Unlocking the Secrets of a Rare Book from the Hatfield Library’s Vault.

By Doreen Simonsen
Humanities, Fine Arts, and Rare Book Librarian

Cover of the 1599 Vulgate

Researching a Rare Book is often like a treasure hunt.  The Mark O. Hatfield Library has hundreds of rare books ranging from medieval manuscripts to 20th century first editions, and my study of one of these works, a Latin Bible entitled Biblia Sacra, proves that you really cannot judge a book by its cover.

It all started with Martin Luther.  His actions in Wittenberg inspired the leaders of the Counter Reformation to revise their version of the Bible.  With the endorsement of Pope Clement the Sixth (1592 to 1605) and the Council of Trent (1545 – 1563), the Clementine Vulgate Bible was printed widely throughout Europe.  Our library catalog record for this book notes that our copy was published in Antwerp, Belgium at the Plantin Moretus Printing House in 1599.  According to records from that printing house, Jan Moretus shipped 500 unbound copies of this book, Biblia Sacra, to Germany to be sold at the famous Frankfurt Book Fair in the Fall of 1599.  The books in that shipment were missing a quire, (a section) of the book, and our copy has missing pages, which were replaced with handwritten copies of the missing texts.  But who wrote those handwritten pages?  And who bound this book?

Missing Pages from 1599 Vulgate

In the Renaissance and Reformation, books were sold unbound, and the buyers of those texts would have them bound by professional bookbinders.  Thanks to Luther’s nailing his 95 Theses to the door of the cathedral in Wittenberg in 1517, that city became a center of book publishing and bookbinding.  By 1555 Wittenberg had a guild of 50 bookbinders, who engraved metal plates and rolls to decorate the leather book covers they made. The cover on our bible is embellished with images, borders, Latin quotes, the initials CKW and the date 1562.  CKW turned out to be Caspar Kraft of Wittemberg, a prominent bookbinder in that city in northern Germany.  The images on his 1562 plates are of Justicia and Lucretia, images “that Lutherans used to justify their resistance to imperial [and papal] authority.”1

Around these images are decorative borders made by bookbinding rolls, which were made by Hans Herolt of Würzburg, in southern Germany.  Who hired Herolt to bind this book?  Julius Echter von Mespelbruun, the Prince-Bishop of Würzburg from 1573 – 1617, is the most likely candidate.  A Latin inscription in the books states that “Magister Wolfgang Christoph Röner received (this book) due to the generosity of the most reverend and most holy Prince-Bishop of Würzburg.”  Another inscription is by Andreas Weissens…, a theology student, who might be the person who wrote in the missing pages in this bible.

Theology Student Inscription

The most prominent inscription, however, is that of Dr. Charles H. Hall who gave this book to Willamette University in 1875.  Born in Kentucky, Hall studied Classics at Indiana Ashbury College in 1852, taught Latin, Greek, and Natural Sciences at Willamette University in the late 1850s, and became the son-in-law of Alvan Waller in 1859.

How this Latin Catholic Bible with Lutheran images on the bindings traveled from Germany to America is a mystery that may never be solved, but revealing its secrets shows that rare books can be more than old texts with pretty pictures.  They are artifacts worthy of study in their own right that can illuminate historical controversies and engage curious student researchers here at Willamette University.  A rare book can truly be much more than its cover.

 

“Closeup of the CKW 1562 book
plate stamp made by Caspar
Kraft of Wittenburg, Germany”
“Emblem of the Plantin Moretus
Printing House, Antwerp, Belgium”
“Closeup of the book border rolls
made by Hans Herolt of
Würzburg, Germany”
“Inscriptions, Including Charles Hall’s
Donation to Willamette, 1876″

 

1 Zapalac, Kristin Eldyss Sorensen. In His Image and Likeness : Political Iconography and Religious Change in Regensburg, 1500-1600. Cornell University Press, 1990. Page 128.

 


New Art in Archives

We recently added a few works of art that are on display in the Archives. Four artists represent this collection of art, and their works range from the year 1946 to 1996 circa.  These artworks are on loan from the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University.  To view the art, please visit the Archives and Special Collections between the hours of 9 a.m. to Noon and 1 p.m. and 4 p.m.

 

Image of Art: The Dance, 1946 Artist: Carl A. Hall

Title: The Dance

Date: 1946

Medium: Oil on Canvas

Image of Art: Not by a dam site, 1959 Artists: Eunice Parsons

Title: Not a Dam Site

Date: 1959

Medium: Oil on canvas

Image of Art: Untitled horsemen, 1964 Artist: Eunice Parsons

Title: Untitled

Date: 1964

Medium: Collage on
canvas panel

Image of Art: Clover Small Vetch Seed Pods and Horsetails, 1996  

Artist: Stephan Soihl

Title: Clover, Small Vetch
Seed Pods, and Horsetails

Date:1996

Medium: Charcoal pencil
and watercolor

Image of art: ColburnJon Night Play, 2003  

 

Artist: Jon Colburn

Title: Night Play

Date: 2003

Medium: Acrylic on canvas

 

 

For comments and questions about this art, please contact Mary McRobinson (mmcrobin@willamette.edu), University Archivist at Willamette University, and Jonathan Bucci (jbucci@willamette.edu), Curator of Collections and Exhibitions at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University.


Using Free Photos

By John Repplinger

Not everyone has the time, resources, or talent to make their own graphics.  So for those of us who fall into this group, below is a list of some incredible tools that will help you locate millions of free images that can be used legally.  You may not know that an artist who takes a photo or creates a graphic has the legal right to share or distribute copies of their work.  This legal right is known as copyright, and permission must be granted by the artist to legally use the image.

It is important to note that there are some limits to copyright, such as the Fair Use guidelines (details at copyright.gov).  Nonprofit educational purpose is probably the most common copyright exception.  For example, students may use images for a class paper and instructors are in most cases allowed to use images for class instruction since it is for educational purposes.  Just make sure to cite where you found it so you don’t plagiarize!

Pexels – This site offers hundreds of thousands of high quality professional-grade photos.  All photos on Pexels are free for personal and commercial purposes, and each picture has been reviewed for high quality.

Pixabay – Over 1.5 million royalty-free professional stock photos and videos are shared by the Pixabay community.

Unsplash – Similar to Pinterest, the images on Unsplash can be browsed by keyword on a single ever-scrolling page of photos.  All of the 550,000+ images are free.

Flickr Creative Commons – With over 55 million images, Flickr is one of the largest photo-sharing platforms around.  Most Flickr users have chosen to offer their work for free under a Creative Commons license.  This means you are free to use the photos by attributing the artist, not changing the photo, and not using it for commercial purposes. Anyone can upload photos, so some of the images are not high quality.

Every Stock Photo – Over 29 million free photos from various organizations such as NASA and the Library of Congress.

Stock Vault – This is a free community where photographers and artists share their own high quality photos and illustrations.  There are thousands of high quality images that range from people, animals, plants, buildings, landscapes, textures, and even concepts.

Google Images – Major search engines such as Google can usually limit results to specific usage rights (e.g. free to use, share, or modify, even commercially).  These limits are typically found under the advanced search option. Bing is another search engine that offers this same feature.

Free Images – Browse through thousands of professional photos, some of which may require attributing the photographer.

Ancestry Images – Besides genealogical info, Ancestry Images includes historical maps, images, and prints, most of which come from around the 1800s.

Free Digital Photos – This site has thousands of high quality photos of people in settings that range from weddings to business, but the results can sometimes blend with the professional for-profit work.

Photo Pin – Photo Pin is an image search engine for the Creative Commons, and also suggests high quality for-purchase images.


Robert Bibler Exhibit

The Mark O. Hatfield Library has on display four pieces from the current exhibition “Robert Bibler: Works on Paper” at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Robert Bibler lives in Salem, Oregon, and taught studio art and film studies for 30 years at Chemeketa Community College. He also helped bring classic and contemporary films to Salem for 40 years as Coordinator of the Wednesday Evening Film Series.

The art is on display on the first floor of the library throughout the summer. Read more about Robert Bibler and the exhibition at: http://willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2017-18/robert_bibler.html

 

 


New Chairs

Notice anything different about the library?  Over the summer we replaced many of our old wooden chairs with a style of chair that we already have.  If you prefer the old wooden chairs, rest assured that we still several scattered throughout the library.  Interestingly, these wooden chairs came from the original library which was located in Smullin Hall.  The new chairs are able to tip back more easily and safely.

 


Mysteries…

The inspector is in! Come investigate some of our mystery books from our collection.  Below are just a few tantalizing titles!

Crime scene chemistry for the annchair sleuth by Cathy Cobb
Call Number: HV8073 .C584 2007

Russian Pulp by Anthony Olcott
Call Number. PG3098.D46 043 2001

Crime and punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Call Number: PG3326 .P7 2014

A Night In the Cemetery by Anton Chekov; Peter Sekirin
Call Number: PG3456.A 13 S45 2008

Sister Pelagia and the Red Cockerel by Boris Akunln; Andrew Bromfield
Call Number: PG3478.K78 P4613 2009

The Curious Casebook of Inspector Hanshichl by Kldo Okamoto; Ian Macdonald
Call Number. PL813.K3 H36213 2007

Out by Natsuo Kirino
Call Number: PL855.I566 08713 2005

Villain by Shuichl Yoshida
Call Number: PL865.O658 A7513 2010

Fatal Fascinations by Suzanne Bray
Call Number: PN56.C7 F38 2013

The silence of the lambs by Barry Forshaw
Call Number. PN1997.S4966 F67 2013

Crime Fiction by Richard Bradford
Call Number: PN3448.D4 B648 2015

A Moment on the Edge by Elisabeth George
Call Number: PN6120.95.D45 C75 2004

Road to perdition by Max Allan Collins
Call Number: PN6727.C573 R635 2002

Kill my mother : a graphic novel by Jules Feiffer
Call Number: PN6727.F4 K55 2014

The homeland directive by Robert Venditti
Call Number: PN6727.V455 H66 2011

Apocalypse hebe : roman by Virginie Despentes
Call Number: PQ2664.E7895 ABB 2010

The Map and the Territory by Michel Houellebecq
Call Number: PO2668.O77 C3713 2012

Possessions bv Julia Kristeva: Barbara Brav
Call Number: PO2671.R547 P67131998

Paris Nocturne by Patrick Modlano
Call Number: PQ2673.O3 A6413 2015

So You Don’t Get Lost In the Neighborhood by Patrick Mediano
can Number: PQ2673.O3 P6813 2015

Missing Person by Patrick Modiano
Call Number: PQ2673.O3 R813 2005

53 Days by David Bellos
Call Number: PQ2676.E67 A16131999

The Seventh Function of Language by Laurent Binet
Call Number: PQ2702.157 S4713 2017

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco
Call Number: PQ4865.C6 N613 2014

Numero zero by Umberto Eco
Call Number: PQ4865.C6 N8613 2015

Iberian crime fiction by Nancy Vosburg
Call Number: PQ6147.D47 124 2011

El secreto de la modelo extravlada by Eduardo Mendoza
Call Number: PQ6663.E54 S43 2015

The Flanders Panel by Arturo Perez-Reverte
Call Number: PQ6666.E765 T3313 2004

La marca del meridlano by Lorenzo Silva
Call Number: PQ6669.I3877 M37 2012

Artful Assassins by Fernando Fabio Sanchez
Call Number: PQ7207.O48 S36 2010

The Black Minutes by Martin Solares
Call Number: PQ7298.429.O43 863 2010

Adl6s Hemingway ; &, La cola de la serpiente : novela by Leonardo Padura
Call Number: PQ7390.P32 A65 2001

Rosaura A las Diez by Marco DeNevi
Call Number: PQ7797.O394 RB 2006

Ripper by Isabel Allende
Call Number: PQ8098.1.L54 D47132014

The Man Who Was Thursday by G. K. Chesterton
Call Number: PR4453.C4 M4 2007

The Body In the Ubrary by Agatha Christle
Call Number: PR6005.H66 86 2011

Dorothy L Sayers: the Complete Stories by Dorothy L Sayers
Call Number: PR6037.A95 C65 2013

Not to disturb by Muriel Spark
Call Number: PR6037.P29 N6 2010

Enduring Love by Ian McEwan
Call Number: PR6063.C4 E53 1998

Star of the Sea by Joseph O’Connor
Call Number: PR6065.C558 S73 2003

The golden house : a novel by Salman Rushdie
Call Number: PR6068.U757 G65 2017

Pigeon English by Stephen Kelman
Call Number: PR6111.E524 P54 2011

Detecting Canada by Jeannette Sloniowski
Call Number: PR9197.35.D48 048 2014

The book of memory by Petina Gappah
Call Number: PR9390.9.G37 B66 2016

The White Tiger by Aravind Adlga
Call Number: PR9619.4.A35 W47 2008

Murder on the Reservation by Ray B. Browne J
Call Number: PS374.O4 B765 2004

Sleuthing Ethnicity by Dorothea Fischer Homung (Editor); Monika Mueller
Call Number: PS374.D4 S58 2003

New Orleans Nolr by Julie Smith
Call Number: PS558.L8 N49 2007

The Hunter and Other Stories by Dashiell Hammett
Call Number: PS3515.A4347 A6 2013

A father’s law by Richard Wright
Call Number: PS3545.R815 F38 2008

Origin by Diana Abu-Jaber
Call Number. PS3551.B895 074 2007

Those Bones Are Not My Child by Toni Cade Bambara
Call Number. PS3552.A473 T471999

Talk Talk by T. C. Boyle
Call Number: PS3552.O932 T35 2006

The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Call Number. PS3552.R685434 03 2003

The Hot Country by Robert Olen Butler
Call Number: PS3552.U8278 H68 2012

The Yiddish Policemen’s Union by Michael Chabon
Call Number: PS3553.H15 Y54 2007

Sacred Games by Vikram Chandra
Call Number. PS3553.H27165 S33 2007

The Big Seven by Jim Harrison
Call Number: PS3558.A67 854 2015

Ambrose Bierce and the Queen of Spades by Oakley M. Hall
Call Number: PS3558.A373 A84 1998

Talented Mr Ripley by Patricia Highsmith
Call Number. PS3558.1366 A6 1999

The tremor of forgery by Patricia Highsmith
Call Number: PS3558.I366 T7 2011

Give Me Your Heart by Joyce Carol Oates
Call Number: PS3565.A8 G58 2010


Collaborative Research

By Michael Spalti

Collaborative research at a college or university takes many forms. More common in the sciences and social sciences than the arts and humanities, collaborative research nevertheless happens in and across every discipline and creates possibilities not available to the individual researcher.

This is true by definition of research projects that use digital media and techniques to compliment or replace traditional research publishing.  These digital projects typically involve time and expertise beyond the capability or interest of a single researcher — whether that researcher is a faculty member, a student, or a librarian.  Envisioning the research project and managing the learning curve of design, data gathering, interpretation, and implementation is not easy. That may explain why these projects are somewhat rare.

So why bother? I think the answer is that digital collaborative research creates significant and unique outcomes for the people involved and those who experience the end result.

Let’s focus on benefits to the student researcher. A liberal arts education is not about technical wizardry in a single field, and to the extent that creating “digital” research becomes an end in itself there’s potential for distraction. But it’s also clear that one’s ability to create and wisely use digital products is a vital part of being educated in today’s society. Prior experience working on digital projects may also enhance one’s ability to find meaningful employment once out of school. 

Research projects that involve students, faculty, librarians, archivists, or museum curators are a good way to explore digital tools and techniques within the context of a great liberal arts education.  More can often be achieved working collaboratively than working solo in a single semester. By definition, the product is not entirely your own, but you learn from instructors and mentors and create something that will last beyond graduation. 

One of the things we could do better as an institution is document your work. Academic transcripts don’t tell the full story.  For example, if a student works on an archival collection in the library’s Digital Production Lab, that contribution should be documented and described. This happens in some cases, for some research projects, but not always.  If you were to complete an online course on a popular learning platform (like Coursera, EdX, or Udacity) you could document that accomplishment on something like LinkedIn. We should make it possible to do the same for all collaborative research projects, whether completed for academic credit, through an internship, or on-campus employment.

Note: The image below, entitled “Alchemical Tree, Pseudo-Lull,” is taken from Salvador Dali’s Alchimie des Philosophes. The image is part of an exhibit created by Michelle Atherton (’15) in collaboration with Professor Abigail Sussik and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art curator Jonathan Bucci.


Faculty Works Display

The 2018 Faculty Works Display is now on exhibit on the first floor of the library.  We encourage you to come browse the many articles written by faculty, explore what they have been researching recently, and discover more about their interests.  We also have a selection of art works from our art faculty, as well as creative productions by faculty from our Theatre Department.  These will all be on display throughout the end of the semester.

For comments and questions about this display, please contact Charity Braceros-Simon (cbracerossimon@willamette.edu)