Robert Bibler Exhibit

The Mark O. Hatfield Library has on display four pieces from the current exhibition “Robert Bibler: Works on Paper” at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Robert Bibler lives in Salem, Oregon, and taught studio art and film studies for 30 years at Chemeketa Community College. He also helped bring classic and contemporary films to Salem for 40 years as Coordinator of the Wednesday Evening Film Series.

The art is on display on the first floor of the library throughout the summer. Read more about Robert Bibler and the exhibition at: http://willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2017-18/robert_bibler.html

 

 


New Chairs

Notice anything different about the library?  Over the summer we replaced many of our old wooden chairs with a style of chair that we already have.  If you prefer the old wooden chairs, rest assured that we still several scattered throughout the library.  Interestingly, these wooden chairs came from the original library which was located in Smullin Hall.  The new chairs are able to tip back more easily and safely.

 


Mysteries…

The inspector is in! Come investigate some of our mystery books from our collection.  Below are just a few tantalizing titles!

Crime scene chemistry for the annchair sleuth by Cathy Cobb
Call Number: HV8073 .C584 2007

Russian Pulp by Anthony Olcott
Call Number. PG3098.D46 043 2001

Crime and punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Call Number: PG3326 .P7 2014

A Night In the Cemetery by Anton Chekov; Peter Sekirin
Call Number: PG3456.A 13 S45 2008

Sister Pelagia and the Red Cockerel by Boris Akunln; Andrew Bromfield
Call Number: PG3478.K78 P4613 2009

The Curious Casebook of Inspector Hanshichl by Kldo Okamoto; Ian Macdonald
Call Number. PL813.K3 H36213 2007

Out by Natsuo Kirino
Call Number: PL855.I566 08713 2005

Villain by Shuichl Yoshida
Call Number: PL865.O658 A7513 2010

Fatal Fascinations by Suzanne Bray
Call Number: PN56.C7 F38 2013

The silence of the lambs by Barry Forshaw
Call Number. PN1997.S4966 F67 2013

Crime Fiction by Richard Bradford
Call Number: PN3448.D4 B648 2015

A Moment on the Edge by Elisabeth George
Call Number: PN6120.95.D45 C75 2004

Road to perdition by Max Allan Collins
Call Number: PN6727.C573 R635 2002

Kill my mother : a graphic novel by Jules Feiffer
Call Number: PN6727.F4 K55 2014

The homeland directive by Robert Venditti
Call Number: PN6727.V455 H66 2011

Apocalypse hebe : roman by Virginie Despentes
Call Number: PQ2664.E7895 ABB 2010

The Map and the Territory by Michel Houellebecq
Call Number: PO2668.O77 C3713 2012

Possessions bv Julia Kristeva: Barbara Brav
Call Number: PO2671.R547 P67131998

Paris Nocturne by Patrick Modlano
Call Number: PQ2673.O3 A6413 2015

So You Don’t Get Lost In the Neighborhood by Patrick Mediano
can Number: PQ2673.O3 P6813 2015

Missing Person by Patrick Modiano
Call Number: PQ2673.O3 R813 2005

53 Days by David Bellos
Call Number: PQ2676.E67 A16131999

The Seventh Function of Language by Laurent Binet
Call Number: PQ2702.157 S4713 2017

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco
Call Number: PQ4865.C6 N613 2014

Numero zero by Umberto Eco
Call Number: PQ4865.C6 N8613 2015

Iberian crime fiction by Nancy Vosburg
Call Number: PQ6147.D47 124 2011

El secreto de la modelo extravlada by Eduardo Mendoza
Call Number: PQ6663.E54 S43 2015

The Flanders Panel by Arturo Perez-Reverte
Call Number: PQ6666.E765 T3313 2004

La marca del meridlano by Lorenzo Silva
Call Number: PQ6669.I3877 M37 2012

Artful Assassins by Fernando Fabio Sanchez
Call Number: PQ7207.O48 S36 2010

The Black Minutes by Martin Solares
Call Number: PQ7298.429.O43 863 2010

Adl6s Hemingway ; &, La cola de la serpiente : novela by Leonardo Padura
Call Number: PQ7390.P32 A65 2001

Rosaura A las Diez by Marco DeNevi
Call Number: PQ7797.O394 RB 2006

Ripper by Isabel Allende
Call Number: PQ8098.1.L54 D47132014

The Man Who Was Thursday by G. K. Chesterton
Call Number: PR4453.C4 M4 2007

The Body In the Ubrary by Agatha Christle
Call Number: PR6005.H66 86 2011

Dorothy L Sayers: the Complete Stories by Dorothy L Sayers
Call Number: PR6037.A95 C65 2013

Not to disturb by Muriel Spark
Call Number: PR6037.P29 N6 2010

Enduring Love by Ian McEwan
Call Number: PR6063.C4 E53 1998

Star of the Sea by Joseph O’Connor
Call Number: PR6065.C558 S73 2003

The golden house : a novel by Salman Rushdie
Call Number: PR6068.U757 G65 2017

Pigeon English by Stephen Kelman
Call Number: PR6111.E524 P54 2011

Detecting Canada by Jeannette Sloniowski
Call Number: PR9197.35.D48 048 2014

The book of memory by Petina Gappah
Call Number: PR9390.9.G37 B66 2016

The White Tiger by Aravind Adlga
Call Number: PR9619.4.A35 W47 2008

Murder on the Reservation by Ray B. Browne J
Call Number: PS374.O4 B765 2004

Sleuthing Ethnicity by Dorothea Fischer Homung (Editor); Monika Mueller
Call Number: PS374.D4 S58 2003

New Orleans Nolr by Julie Smith
Call Number: PS558.L8 N49 2007

The Hunter and Other Stories by Dashiell Hammett
Call Number: PS3515.A4347 A6 2013

A father’s law by Richard Wright
Call Number: PS3545.R815 F38 2008

Origin by Diana Abu-Jaber
Call Number. PS3551.B895 074 2007

Those Bones Are Not My Child by Toni Cade Bambara
Call Number. PS3552.A473 T471999

Talk Talk by T. C. Boyle
Call Number: PS3552.O932 T35 2006

The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Call Number. PS3552.R685434 03 2003

The Hot Country by Robert Olen Butler
Call Number: PS3552.U8278 H68 2012

The Yiddish Policemen’s Union by Michael Chabon
Call Number: PS3553.H15 Y54 2007

Sacred Games by Vikram Chandra
Call Number. PS3553.H27165 S33 2007

The Big Seven by Jim Harrison
Call Number: PS3558.A67 854 2015

Ambrose Bierce and the Queen of Spades by Oakley M. Hall
Call Number: PS3558.A373 A84 1998

Talented Mr Ripley by Patricia Highsmith
Call Number. PS3558.1366 A6 1999

The tremor of forgery by Patricia Highsmith
Call Number: PS3558.I366 T7 2011

Give Me Your Heart by Joyce Carol Oates
Call Number: PS3565.A8 G58 2010


Collaborative Research

By Michael Spalti

Collaborative research at a college or university takes many forms. More common in the sciences and social sciences than the arts and humanities, collaborative research nevertheless happens in and across every discipline and creates possibilities not available to the individual researcher.

This is true by definition of research projects that use digital media and techniques to compliment or replace traditional research publishing.  These digital projects typically involve time and expertise beyond the capability or interest of a single researcher — whether that researcher is a faculty member, a student, or a librarian.  Envisioning the research project and managing the learning curve of design, data gathering, interpretation, and implementation is not easy. That may explain why these projects are somewhat rare.

So why bother? I think the answer is that digital collaborative research creates significant and unique outcomes for the people involved and those who experience the end result.

Let’s focus on benefits to the student researcher. A liberal arts education is not about technical wizardry in a single field, and to the extent that creating “digital” research becomes an end in itself there’s potential for distraction. But it’s also clear that one’s ability to create and wisely use digital products is a vital part of being educated in today’s society. Prior experience working on digital projects may also enhance one’s ability to find meaningful employment once out of school. 

Research projects that involve students, faculty, librarians, archivists, or museum curators are a good way to explore digital tools and techniques within the context of a great liberal arts education.  More can often be achieved working collaboratively than working solo in a single semester. By definition, the product is not entirely your own, but you learn from instructors and mentors and create something that will last beyond graduation. 

One of the things we could do better as an institution is document your work. Academic transcripts don’t tell the full story.  For example, if a student works on an archival collection in the library’s Digital Production Lab, that contribution should be documented and described. This happens in some cases, for some research projects, but not always.  If you were to complete an online course on a popular learning platform (like Coursera, EdX, or Udacity) you could document that accomplishment on something like LinkedIn. We should make it possible to do the same for all collaborative research projects, whether completed for academic credit, through an internship, or on-campus employment.

Note: The image below, entitled “Alchemical Tree, Pseudo-Lull,” is taken from Salvador Dali’s Alchimie des Philosophes. The image is part of an exhibit created by Michelle Atherton (’15) in collaboration with Professor Abigail Sussik and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art curator Jonathan Bucci.


Faculty Works Display

The 2018 Faculty Works Display is now on exhibit on the first floor of the library.  We encourage you to come browse the many articles written by faculty, explore what they have been researching recently, and discover more about their interests.  We also have a selection of art works from our art faculty, as well as creative productions by faculty from our Theatre Department.  These will all be on display throughout the end of the semester.

For comments and questions about this display, please contact Charity Braceros-Simon (cbracerossimon@willamette.edu)


MOHL Research Awards

If you are a student and have written and researched an excellent paper, why not submit your paper for consideration for the MOHL Research Award?  Sponsored by the Hatfield Library, this award recognizes and rewards Willamette undergraduate students in any discipline who demonstrate outstanding research using library and information resources in writing a paper. Up to two awards of $500 each are available.

Student papers written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work are eligible to be considered for this award. The paper must be 7 pages or more in length and written in the current academic year (fall 2017/spring 2018). Papers done as a senior project but in the junior year are excluded.

Papers need to be submitted by the last day of finals May 8, 2018 at 5:00 pm. The faculty mentor who worked with the student during the production of the paper is asked to submit a statement of support and a copy of the assignment.  Faculty, please encourage your best student writers/researchers to apply!

For complete details and instructions see: http://library.willamette.edu/about/award

 


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Jennifer Cognard-Black

Please join us for the final event of the Spring 2018 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading with Jennifer Cognard-Black this Tuesday, April 10th at 5:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room (2nd floor of the Hatfield Library). This event is free and open to the public.

Jennifer Cognard-Black is a Professor of English at St. Mary’s College of Maryland. Her specialties are Anglo-American women novelists, fiction writing, and the literatures of food. A Fulbright scholar to Slovenia as well as the Norton T. Dodge Award for Creative and Scholarly Achievement, Cognard-Black’s books include Narrative in the Professional Age (Routledge 2004); Kindred Hands (Iowa UP 2006); a writing textbook, Advancing Rhetoric (Kendall/Hunt 2006); an anthology of food fictions, culinary poems, and recipe recollections, Books that Cook: The Making of a Literary Meal (NYUP 2014); and a collection of essays by women writers about their everyday contraptions, From Curlers to Chainsaws: Women and Their Machines (MSUP 2016).

Cognard-Black is a dynamic, accomplished writer of both scholarly and creative work. Of her process, she says, “When I write creatively, I put things together. I synthesize disparate parts of what constitutes the human: a salamander in the bathroom, the bouncy chorus of an overplayed song, loss, love, death, delight, or a broken bone at age three. Like the synthesis of an exquisite, yet simple, dish—that divine combination, say, of April asparagus, crispy fingerling potatoes, rosemary, olive oil, and an over-easy egg—a well-crafted short story or essay should become more than the sum of its parts. Such writing should be absolutely of this world yet also, always, otherworldly: a combination that defies easy explanation and that brings both pleasure and awe.”

Praise for the works of Jennifer Cognard-Black:

“The anthology From Curlers to Chainsaws: Women and Their Machines, features essays examining women’s relationships with a wide range of tools: from tractor to typewriter, sewing machine to microphone, radio to prosthetic leg. The book offers a timely focus, during an era when cell phones, laptops, and fitness trackers can feel like extensions of our very selves. Edited by Joyce Dyer, Jennifer Cognard-Black, and Elizabeth MacLeod Walls, the anthology focuses on machines in use from the early 20th century through today. It offers historical context for contemporary discussions about how today’s technologies shape our lives—the ways we think, the relationships we have, and the identities we adopt—and it provides insight into how these machines connect with the experiences of women, including daughters and mothers.” — Heather Mcentarfer, Literary Mama

“What is particularly innovative about Books that Cook is the way in which the book calls upon the reader to bring these recipes to life: “When a food is shared and eaten, the reader actually embodies the text . . . the reader’s own body is altered as a result of reading and eating this text. In a very real sense, then, a recipe reader becomes that recipe: she breathes it, her heart beats it, and thus the text is known both by the mind and by the body” (2). However, to “embody the text” does not require chronological linearity. Instead, the reader is encouraged to “sample” the poetics, prose, and recipes based on their unique position and ‘taste.’” –Lila A. Sharif, American Studies

“In Kindred Hands Jennifer Cognard-Black and Elizabeth MacLeod Walls have compiled an extraordinarily useful and lively collection of letters by major British and American literary women from Harriet Beecher Stowe to Jessie Redmon Fauset. Energetic, imaginative, analytic, and keenly committed to their art, all these authors muse on the muse—and often with vivid candor on their own experiences of art and life—in writings that will be fascinating not only to the professional scholar but also to what Virginia Woolf called ‘the common reader.’”—Sandra M. Gilbert, coeditor, The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women

For more on Jennifer Cognard-Black, please visit her author’s site at http://www.jennifercognard-black.com

Questions about the event, please direct to: Danielle Deulen at dcdeulen@willamette.edu.


Frankenstein Talk

You’re invited to attend the 2018 Humanities Seminar lecture on Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein on Thursday, April 5th, at 4:30pm in the Hatfield Room.

Title: “Frankenstein’s Poetry”

Presenter: Dr. Forest Pyle (University of Oregon)

Abstract: Dr. Forest Pyle (University of Oregon) will deliver the 2018 Humanities Seminar lecture on Mary Shelley’s book entitled Frankenstein.  This talk will also commemorate the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s “hideous progeny.”

Dr. Pyle’s work explores the problems and possibilities posed by aesthetic experience, particularly in the context of Romantic and post-Romantic literature. His first book examined the ideological workings and implications of the Romantic concept of the imagination from Wordsworth and Coleridge through George Eliot. He is presently completing a book manuscript on something he calls a “radical aestheticism,” the term that he believes best describes the nature of a recurring event in certain of the most powerful and resonant texts of the British Romantic literary tradition. He is interested in the various forms and effects of this aesthetic radicalization in a strain of Romanticism that extends from Percy Shelley and Keats through Dickinson, Hopkins, and Dante Rossetti through Wilde.

Contact Information

Name: Stephanie DeGooyer

Phone: 503-370-6248

Email: sdegooye@willamette.edu


Tessa Conroy Talk

You are all invited to a lecture by Tessa Conroy, an economist whose research is focused on women-owned businesses and other trends in entrepreneurship. Her work has been featured in both state and national media, including recently on Wisconsin Public Radio/Television.

Title: “Do as I Do: An Application of Discrete Choice with Social Interactions to Entrepreneurship”

Presenter: Dr. Tessa Conroy

Time & Location: Monday, March 19th, at 4:15pm in the Hatfield Room.

Abstract: Dr. Tessa Conroy is jointly appointed to the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Center for Community and Economic Development with University of Wisconsin-Extension. She earned her PhD in Economics from Colorado State University in 2014.  Her research and outreach focus on regional economic growth and development with particular emphasis on small business dynamics.   Her research on women-owned businesses, job creation, entrepreneurship, and labor market trends have been featured in both state and national media, including recently on Wisconsin Public Radio/Television.  Refreshments will be provided.

Sponsored by the Economics Department.

Contact Information

Name: Tabitha Knight

Phone: 503-370-6232

Email: knightt@willamette.edu


Vietnam Revolution & War Lecture

Please join us Tuesday, March 20th, at 4:15 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for a guest lecture sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies.

Presenter: Tuong Vu, Professor of Political Science and Director of Asian Studies at the University of Oregon Tuong-Vu

Title: Vietnam Revolution & War

Abstract: Tuong Vu is a Professor of Political Science and Director of Asian Studies at the University of Oregon.  He has held visiting appointments at Princeton University and the National University of Singapore and has taught at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA.  Vu’s research concerns the comparative politics of state formation, development, nationalism, and revolutions, with a particular focus on East Asia.

His latest book, Vietnam’s Communist Revolution: The Power and Limits of Ideology (Cambridge University Press, 2017), focuses on the evolving worldview of Vietnamese revolutionaries and shows the depth and resilience of the commitment to communist utopia in their foreign policy.  The book challenges the conventional understanding of the Vietnam War and the Vietnamese revolution.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies.  For more information contact Greg Felker (gfelker@willamette.edu).  This event is free and open to the public.  Refreshments are provided.