The Joy of Art

Paint tubes and paint brushes with paint on them

There is a lot going on in the world right now and many of us are feeling anxious or stressed. Finding methods to help us cope with the uncertainties in our lives is important; one valuable resource to remember is art. Whether you enjoy making art or you love looking at art, art can make a difference. Art has a way of lifting us up, providing much needed distraction, offering moments of joy, inspiring us, and helping us through times of crisis. There is increasing evidence that “art enhances brain function and well-being,” which seems like a positive outcome for all. August is a great time to stop and reflect on the wonder of art in our lives because it is American Artist Appreciation Month! Lots of museums from around the globe are offering virtual tours of their collections that you can enjoy from the comfort of home. Willamette’s very own Hallie Ford Museum offers a great variety of art from all over the world but with a particular emphasis on Northwest art and the Hatfield Library has its own special tie to American artists with the Pacific Northwest Artists Archive. In celebration of American artists, check out the diverse selection of print and e-books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

 


The Right of Peaceful Protest

The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees “the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” The Boston Tea Party, Civil Rights protests, Women’s Right to Vote marches, Black Lives Matter protests, Iraq War protests, Vietnam War protests, Occupy protests, LGBTQ rights marches, Dakota Access Pipeline protests, March for Our Lives, March for Science—these are just some of the many examples of people exercising their first amendment rights through protest.  For generations, people have been using protests as a way to make their voices heard, call attention to an issue, influence government policy, and change the world.  Millions of people have protested and marched in an effort to fight against injustices and enact social change.  In the thick of these protests, it is sometimes hard to see what they accomplish but in the long term, protests have often succeeded in bringing about important change and even altering the course of history.  In celebration of our right to assembly, check out the diverse selection of protest-related e-books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

 

Let us remember, we are all part of one American family.  We are united in common values, and that includes belief in equality under the law, basic respect for public order, and the right of peaceful protest. – Barack Obama


Digital Collections for Remote Research

By Stepanie Milne-Lane, Processing Archivist and Records Manager smilnelane@willamette.edu

Since the ongoing public health crisis forced the Hatfield Library to transition its services in March, the Willamette University (WU) Archives & Special Collections has missed the students, staff, faculty, and community members that frequently walked through our door.

We know that remote research comes with challenges — Not everything is digitized and there is something satisfying about opening a box and systematically going through archival folders. Over the years, the WU Archives & Special Collections has made steady progress in creating digital collections. Each of our four collecting areas boasts digital collections that are ripe for research.

Parsons Sketch

Eunice Parsons, “Sketchbook 1, Image 5,” Willamette University Archives

The WU University Archives & Records has numerous digitized collections that are keyword searchable and hold the key to WU’s history. Popular digitized collections include The Wallulah, 1903-2006 (student yearbook), The Collegian, 1875-2020 (student newspaper), WU Student Handbooks, 1892-2020, and Catalogs and Bulletins, 1860-2007. Also available are materials relating to Freshman Glee, one of Willamette’s longest running – and most beloved – traditions.

A collaborative project of the WU Archives & Special Collections and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, the Pacific Northwest Artists Archive (PNAA) is a collection of materials related to the careers of artists who are or were active in Oregon and Washington. Digitized PNAA collections include an Eunice Parsons online exhibit that explores and considers the development of Parsons’ more popular style through the lens of her personal sketchbooks.

People exercising in an empty Sparks Pool.

Exercise Class in Sparks Pool, Undated, Campus Photograph Collection.

WU’s extensive Political Papers contain photographs, memorabilia and audiovisual materials of elected individuals representing Oregon at the state and national level. The digitized Norma Paulus Scrapbooks offers a glimpse into Paulus’s campaigns and legislative work.

Rounding our holdings are the Personal Papers, which include manuscript collections, diaries, and the correspondence with a focus on individuals involved in regional missionary work, settling Salem, and developing Willamette University. The digitized Suffrage Era Scrapbook is worth exploring, as it contains poetry, comedic articles and satire, cartoons, articles about women’s suffrage — which celebrates its 100th anniversary in August — and news bulletins about the 1918 Influenza pandemic.

Hatfield Library in 1986

Hatfield Library in 1986

Although our door hasn’t opened and closed as frequently over the past four months, the Archives is anything but quiet. Susan Irwin joined the Hatfield Library team and is spearheading the processing of Senator Mark O. Hatfield’s papers. Staff also completed processing associated with the NHPRC and LSTA grants. We can’t wait to see you, but in the meantime, we hope that our digital collections might come in useful. We are always here to assist with any and all questions you might have. We look forward to having you walk through our door again in the future!


Celebrating the Great Outdoors

June is National Great Outdoors Month and never before has getting outdoors been so important.  As we all struggle to cope with this new world of COVID-19, spending time in nature can bring joy and solace.  Striding along a path, feeling the sun on your back, watching a squirrel scamper up a tree, enjoying the beauty of a brightly-colored flower, listening to the birds singing—it’s magical!  According to the experts, being outside is one of the safest places for us to be right now as long as we remain six feet away from others.  And staying away from others is a lot easier to do outdoors! Those of us living in the Northwest are lucky to live in a temperate climate with easy access to beautiful places in every direction.  Most cities have wonderful parks and trails but just walking around your neighborhood can reveal the natural beauty all around us.  So get outside and join us in celebrating the great outdoors!  In preparation for your time in nature, check out the nature-related e-books listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.

 

In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks–John Muir


Summer Service Update

Based on COVID-19 related restrictions and staffing limitations the Hatfield Library’s services for the summer are significantly different than in past years:

The Building is closed to visitors until further notice
Services are currently restricted to Willamette Faculty, Staff, & Students


Access to library resources:

 

    • Requests for monographs and other physical materials held by the Willamette University Libraries may be emailed to library@willamette.edu. Please provide a full citation for any items. We will retrieve the item and email instructions on how to pick it up.

 

    • Requests for articles held in our physical periodical collections or for articles to be requested from other institutions may be submitted via our Interlibrary Loan  form, but fulfillment may be delayed.

 

    • Summit (currently closed) and other ILL services for physical items are suspended until further notice.

 


Reference Services:

  • We will be suspending the liaison model and will be sharing reference duties amongst the librarians working this summer. We ask that requests for reference help be emailed to library@willamette.edu or that you use our consultation form. We hope to be able to help everyone, but given an inevitable temporary loss of capacity and expertise, we will be using the following priorities:
    • Requests from students in active classes (for the summer this is AGSM).
    • All other requests.


Collection Development:

  • Willamette faculty please use our online “suggest a title” form. Given budget constraints, most orders will not be processed until August.  If you need an item earlier, please explain why in the “other” field at the bottom of the form.


University Archives:


Course Integrated Instruction:

  • Willamette faculty may request an instruction session for the fall. Please email Joni Roberts at jroberts@willamette.edu and she will make sure the class gets on our calendars. Your liaison librarian will contact you in August for further details about the session.

 

Please check back at this website library.willamette.edu for updates or email us at library@willamettte.edu with any questions or concerns.


Illuminating Details: Digitizing Rare Books from the Vault

By Doreen Simonsen, Humanities & Fine Arts Librarian dsimonse@willamette.edu

Last year a collection of rare books from the vault of the Hatfield Library was the subject of a course called Digital Humanities Workshop: Voyages of Discovery in the Vault. These books were first or early editions of 18th and 19th-century books about the discovery and exploration of the Pacific Northwest. The exploits of Vitus Bering, Captain James Cook, George Vancouver, Lewis & Clark, and others were described in these books, often by the explorers themselves. Many of these books have also been digitized in various online collections, such as the Internet Archive, Google Books, HathiTrust Digital Library, the Biodiversity Heritage Library, and more sites.

As the class worked with these digital versions, they soon learned the differing qualities of digitization in the various collections. Students used digital collections, as well as their own photographs of the actual rare books from the vault, to create online exhibits based on these works. Most digitized sources were fine for this purpose, but some of the digitized works were created from poorly photographed microfilm. Here is an example that shows the worst features of digitized microfilm, uneven page layout, etc. This map at the end of the book is unreadable and broken up over several pages.

Fédix, P A.

Fédix, P A. L’orégon, Et Les Côtes De L’océan Pacifique Du Nord: Aperçu Géographique, Statistique Et Politique : Avec Une Carte Du Pays D’après Les Documens Les Plus Récens. Paris: Amyot, 1846. Internet resource.

Luckily the Hatfield Library owned the print copies of these books, and we were able to create superior digital scans of some of them. The maps included in many of these books were central to the focus of the course, so we were able to request that the library’s digital production lab create high-resolution scans of our original print copy of this book from 1846.

L'orégon Et Les Côtes De L'océan Pacifique Du Nord

Fédix, P A. L’orégon Et Les Côtes De L’océan Pacifique Du Nord: Aperçu Géographique, Statistique Et Politique, Avec Une Carte Du Pays D’après Les Documens Les Plus Récens. Paris: Librairie de Amyot, 1846. Print.

L'orégon Et Les Côtes De L'océan Pacifique Du Nord Now the entire map can be viewed at a glance. A wonderful bonus to this new scan is the ability to capture details of each half of the map by right-clicking with your mouse to “View Image”. Doing this will open the high-resolution tiff (Tagged Image File Format) file of that page. Here is a small detail from the left page of the map showing the author’s vision of the Mouth of the Columbia River being a focal point for all international commerce coming to the Oregon Territory in the 1850’s.

 

 

Heures De Simon Vostre a L'usage De Langres

Pigouchet, Philippe. [Heures De Simon Vostre a L’usage De Langres]. Paris: Printed by Philippe Pigouchet for Simon Vostre, 1502.

Book of Hours printed by Philippe Pigouchet for Simon Vostre

Sample page from Heures De Simon Vostre a L’usage De Langres. 1502.

Another treasure from our vault that was recently scanned in high resolution was a printed book of hours from 1502. Only the Bibliothèque national de France (the National Library of France) and Willamette University own copies of this edition of a Book of Hours printed by Philippe Pigouchet for Simon Vostre, a Parisian publisher.
Books of Hours are prayer books developed for the use of the laity in their private devotions.  They were the bestsellers of the Middle Ages, often adorned with hand-painted illustrations, called illuminations, and printed on vellum, like our own manuscript copy entitled Praecis Piae (Pious Prayers).  Printed Books of Hours included numerous woodblock illustrations in order to compete with illuminated manuscript versions.  Our printed book of hours is resplendent with various kinds of images – on each page!  On this page, showing and describing the suffering of St. Sebastian, the text is surrounded by woodcuts of symbolic animals and grotesques.

A recent graduate in Art History, Kendall Matthews, wrote her senior thesis about the woodblock prints of grotesques that she found in our printed book of hours. Entitled “Grotesques Outside the Margins: A Study of the Cultural Influences of Marginalia and Grotesques Through Heures de Simone Vostre a l’usage de Langres,” her thesis explored the deeper symbolic meanings of a selection of grotesque images from this book, as she demonstrated in this image from her thesis presentation video. (Used with permission of the author).

Morality and Violence

Thanks to the work of the Library’s Digital Production Lab, rare books from the vault are getting a new life in digital form, providing students and scholars from around the world with amazing access to the finer details of these works.


Honoring Our Elders

Two older people on bikesMay is Older Americans Month and in light of the devastating impact COVID-19 is having on older populations, it seems particularly important for us to take a moment and pay our respects to older adults around the world.  It is time to celebrate the amazing contributions our elders make to our families and to our communities every day.  Their experience, knowledge and talent benefit all of us in countless ways.  Reach out to the older people in your life and let them now how much you appreciate them.  Join us in celebrating Older Americans Month and while you’re at it, check out these ebook titles related to older adults listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.


COVID: Experiences, Thoughts & Feelings

By Stephanie Milne-Lane, Processing Archivist and Records Manager smilnelane@willamette.edu

We are living in an unprecedented moment in history. Each of us is experiencing this pandemic in our own unique way. In line with our charge to collect, preserve and make available records of enduring value relating to Willamette University, the Archives and Special Collections invites you — Willamette students, staff and faculty — to submit original created works that capture your current experiences, thoughts, challenges and feelings.

Hatfield Library’s archivists and librarians will curate these submissions into a digital exhibition, “COVID: Experiences, Thoughts and Feelings.” This project is by and for our community. Eventually, the collection’s accessibility will broaden, so that decades from now, it can be used for exploration and scholarship.

Express yourself in a medium that best encapsulates your unique lived experience including sketches, audio recordings of music, videos of dance performances, photographs, poems, stories and essays. Full guidelines and the submission forms are available online. Make your submissions before May 8.

If you’re not ready for your submission to be shared today, you may add it to a historical collection that won’t be released until 2025. Do not submit works you want to remain private. You retain the right to ask us to remove your submissions in the future.

If you’d like to make an anonymous submission, donate a physical item (e.g. written diary, sketch, etc.), or have other questions, please contact Processing Archivist and Records Manager Stephanie Milne-Lane.

Thank you for helping us preserve this moment in history.


Faculty Colloquium: Jameson Watts

Please join us on Thursday, April 16, at 4:10 p.m. at this URL:

https://willametteuniversity.zoom.us/s/217971917

for our tenth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Title: The Data Science of (Oregon) Wine: Machine Learning with a Decadent Dataset

Presenter: Jameson Watts, Assistant Professor of Marketing

Jameson Watts

Abstract: What makes an Oregon Pinot so unique? Which taste profiles command the highest price premium? How do Oregon wines compare to famous Pinot-producing regions like Burgundy in France? Using a unique dataset of reviews, ratings and prices, I will answer these questions and more. Plus, find out which Oregon wines give you the most bang for your buck!

…participants are encouraged to open a bottle during the presentation and post it (a picture or description) in the comments.

Bill Kelm and Stephen Patterson
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


The Word for 2020 is Resiliency

The ability to carry on in the face of adversity is crucial, particularly in difficult times such as these.  With severe economic, political, environmental, and public health challenges surrounding us, it is vitally important to cultivate resiliency.  Maya Angelou once said “I can be changed by what happens to me. But I refuse to be reduced by it.”  And Helen Keller’s words of wisdom resonate beautifully all these many years later: “Although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it.”  We all need to consider ways to relieve stress, remain optimistic, and be grateful for the small things.  To help you find your way to resiliency, have a look at the resiliency-related titles listed on our WU Reads Reading Guide.  And although you currently can’t come to the library to pick up a print book, all of these titles are available as ebooks!


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