PNAA Processed Collections

Two (soon-to-be three!) Pacific Northwest Artists Archive (PNAA) collections are processed and open to the public. Over the next 16 months, 13 more collections will be processed thanks to the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) grant Willamette University recently received to increase accessibility to this interesting and important Archive.

The inaugural PNAA collection was the Robert Bibler papers. Robert Bibler is a professional artist and retired college instructor who currently resides in Salem, Oregon, with his wife, artist Carol Hausser. He taught studio art and film studies at Chemeketa Community College in Salem, Oregon from 1973 to 2003. Bibler’s love of classic film inspired him to coordinate two film series: The Amherst Film Cooperative (1972) at the University of Amherst in Amherst, Massachusetts, which he developed with John Morrison and The Wednesday Evening Film Series at Chemeketa Community College (1974-2003) and the Historic Elsinore Theatre (2004-2015), which he edited and planned with Leonard Held.

Bibler has exhibited artwork professionally since 1974. His works can be found in private and public collections throughout the Pacific Northwest, including the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, as well as in cities in the eastern United States. One of Bibler’s paintings, the official portrait of former Oregon Governor Neil Goldschmidt, was on display at the Oregon State Capitol from 1993 until 2011.

The Robert Bibler papers include newspaper articles, photographs, a scrapbook, sketches and drawings, digital files, promotional fliers, brochures, and correspondence concerning Bibler’s commission to paint the official portrait of former Oregon Governor Neil Goldschmidt and his coordination of The Amherst Film Cooperative and The Wednesday Evening Film Series. The collection also includes greeting cards and mail art from Sandra and Dave Nichols, who comprise Nicholsloy Studio.

For more information about the Robert Bibler papers and access to this collection, please see the finding aid.

The second processed collection is the Claudia Cave papers. Claudia Cave is a professional artist who currently resides with her spouse, Kent Sumner, in Corvallis, Oregon, where she also maintains her studio. Cave participated in the mail art movement between 1974 and 2003. The mail art movement (also known as postal art or correspondence art) began in the late 1950s to early 1960s as artists corresponded with each other by sending artwork through the postal service. Cave’s mail art network included regional, national, and international artists.

Cave’s earlier works, including her mail art, are in black and white graphite while her paintings are in gouache and watercolor on paper. Cave’s work is described as vivid and dream-like. She often uses animal imagery, especially dogs, in her works to emphasize the animal-like nature of humans and the human-like nature of animals. Cave’s art has been shown in many exhibits and is included in public and private collections throughout the Pacific Northwest and the United States.

The Claudia Cave papers include materials related to her art career during the years 1974 to 2016. The collection includes: mail art, sketchbooks, slides of drawings and paintings, photographs, promotional fliers, newspapers, books, digital files, t-shirts, a cardboard cutout of Cave, and correspondence. 

For more information about the Claudia Cave papers and access to this collection, please see the finding aid.

The third collection, the Nicholsloy Studio collection, is nearly processed and will be open soon. This collection includes materials documenting the careers of Sandra and Dave Nichols, correspondence with artists and writers, a collection of zines, and a collection of material related to the Beat Generation. 

Please check in regularly to the Archives’ blog for updates on the Pacific Northwest Artists Archive!


Finals Week Extended Study Hours

Christmas TreeThe Hatfield Library is now providing extended hours for final exams. Also, don’t forget about the free cookies provided by Bon Appetit and coffee provided by the library…usually the cookies are made available after 9:30 p.m. starting on Monday, Dec. 10th until they run out.

These are the hours for the end of the term:

Monday, Dec. 3 – Thursday, Dec. 6 — 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 7 — 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8 — 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 9 — 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 10 – Friday, Dec. 15 — 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 15 — 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 17 — CLOSED

Winter break begins on Monday, Dec. 17. During the break, the library will be open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on the weekends. Also, the library (and the rest of campus) will be closed from Dec. 21 through Jan. 1. Regular hours resume on Jan. 22.


Wonderful World of Winter

Winter is coming and we’re not talking about The Game of Thrones.  No, we’re talking about the time of year when the days are shorter, the nights are longer, and the weather is cooler.  In Salem, it’s a time of blustery days, soaking rains, and perhaps even the occasional snow storm.  This time of year can be a wonderful time to head for the coast to watch wild waves while avoiding the summer crowds.  If you don’t mind the rain, hikes at Silver Creek Falls can be rewarding–the falls are impressive with all the rain and the crowds are greatly diminished.  Or head to the mountain for snow fun of all kinds.  It is also prime time for wearing cozy sweaters, sitting by the fire, drinking cocoa, and–you guessed it–reading a good book!  If you need some good winter-themed reading material, check out our WU Reads Reading Guide.


Faculty Colloquium: Kathryn Nyman

Please join us on Friday, November 30th, at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Kathryn Nyman, Associate Professor of Mathematics Kathryn Nyman

Title: How to Get Your Fair Share: Cutting Cakes, Splitting the Rent, and (Friendly) Mathematics

Abstract: A friend approached my collaborator. He and a group of classmates were renting a house. How could they divide the rent fairly so that everyone was satisfied with the price they paid for their room? Whether dealing with property, inheritance, revenue, or taxes, the question of how to divide goods (or “bads”) fairly among a group of people is a ubiquitous problem. We look at elegant ways in which mathematics can assist in keeping family harmony while splitting the leftover pumpkin pie (and more).

Students are welcome and coffee and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Bill Kelm and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: David Griffith

Please join us on Friday, November 16th, at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: David Griffith, Assistant Professor of ChemistryDavid Griffith

Title: Following Carbon in the Arctic and Estrogens in Sewage Using the Tools of Environmental Chemistry

Abstract:
Humans have a knack for altering the natural environment. Every year, we use enormous quantities of chemicals to make widgets and cure diseases. Our activities also release chemical pollutants that harm ecosystems, change the climate, and make us sick. Solving these problems and mitigating future risk requires understanding how chemicals move, change, and interact in aquatic environments at a variety of scales. This talk will highlight how the tools of environmental chemistry, such as radiocarbon dating and mass spectrometry, can be used to (1) track carbon cycling in the deep Arctic Ocean under changing sea-ice conditions, (2) monitor sewage consumption by microbes in the Hudson River Estuary, (3) fingerprint synthetic estrogens from birth control pills, and (4) design cost-effective strategies for removing estrogens from sewage in Salem, OR.

Bill Kelm and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


WU Libraries: Past, Present, and Future

By Joni Roberts

Most of us know that Willamette University has been in existence for over 175 illustrious years but it is not exactly clear when a library officially appeared on the scene.  The student newspaper, The Willamette Collegian, which began publication in 1875, first mentions the library in 1876.  This article describes how the library was located on the first floor of Waller Hall along with the chapel and the “ladies’ and gentlemens’ reception rooms.” Mention of the library in the early years of the Collegian often consists of imploring students, faculty and friends of Willamette to donate much needed books to the library.

 

Library reading room in Waller Hall, early 1920s

Dr. Robert Gatke (d. 1968), Willamette historian and professor, mentions the library a few times in his book Chronicles of Willamette.  His description of the library around 1915 is far from flattering: “The library was the pathetic victim of malnutrition.  With no regular appropriation made for the purchase of books, it depended upon gifts, receiving mostly old books of no value for reference use and not placing within reach of the students the new thought stimulating books as they came from the presses.”

 

Library reading room in 1948 in what is now Smullin Hall

Describing the library in the early 1930’s, Gatke writes “…library housing was inadequate and the weight of the books on the second floor of Waller had become so great that it constituted a serious danger to safety.”  The construction of a new library building was approved in 1937 and the building was dedicated in May of 1938.  At the time of the dedication, the building housed no books but on May 20th, classes were cancelled and students and faculty carried the books from Waller to the new building, the current day Smullin Hall.

 

An addition was added to the building in 1965-66 but before too long, it was determined that the library was no longer adequate and that renovation was not a viable solution.  A building program statement issued by then University Librarian Patricia Stockton in 1980 describes poor lighting, ventilation, heating and a lack of a classroom for instruction sessions.  The report states: “The Library is not inviting to the user.  Most seating is at long study tables in the two main reading areas.  The remainder is in individual study carrels on bare cement floors under buzzing lights.  The bookstacks themselves are too crowded, too narrow, and their color is a bilious green.”

 

Mark O. Hatfield Library dedication, 1986

Happily, approval of a new library building was granted and the present-day library opened in 1986.  Students and faculty once again helped move materials from the old building to the new. The Mark O. Hatfield Library, a tribute to one of Willamette’s most distinguished graduates, was considered state of the art at the time of its dedication. Overlooking the Mill Race and adjacent to Jackson Plaza, today’s library is centrally located in the heart of the campus. The library is a vital public space and includes many attractive areas suitable for study and reflection.

 

The library building is now over 30 years old and while minor renovations have occurred over the years, the library is due for a more substantial remodel.  The library staff has many ideas for a major renovation including improving and increasing student space, updating technology infrastructure, incorporating the WITS Help Desk into the building, and more.  All we need is a generous donor or two!

Smullin Library, 1982: “…individual study carrels on bare cement floors under buzzing lights…”

A young Hatfield Library, 1986

 


Faculty Colloquium: Robert Walker

Please join us on Friday, November 9th, at 3 p.m. in the Carnegie Building for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Robert Walker, Associate Professor of Quantitative Methods

Title: The Educational and Career Impacts of Federal Hiring Preferences for VeteransRobert Walker

Abstract:
Reflecting joint work with Tim Johnson, Grace and Elmer Goudy Professor of Public Management and Policy Analysis at AGSM and Director of the Center for Governance and Public Policy Research, I will talk about two related papers that exploit the entire population of federal employees [47 million person-years] in the Central Personnel Data File obtained under FOIA to explore the impact of US federal hiring preferences for veterans. Researchers have assessed (a) whether military veterans advance in their federal careers at a different rate than nonveterans and (b) whether veterans and nonveterans differ in their educational attainment using either small samples (one percent-samples) or differing definitions of comparable veterans and non-veterans for comparison. Not surprisingly, this research has produced mixed results. With the full population of employee-years and the ability to, as comprehensively as possible define comparison sets, we examine a variety of definitions of comparable veterans and nonveterans to show that there is no causal relation between veterans preference and career trajectories or educational attainment. Our data analysis also highlights the set of confounding factors that have misled previous researchers into finding negative impacts associated with veterans preference.

Note: there will also be a special TGIF reception following the lecture that will be open to faculty from all three schools. This is the second TGIF event this semester with Colloquium speakers from across the University. These opportunities for cross-University gathering and conversation are sponsored by the Office of the Provost and Senior Vice President.

Bill Kelm and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Robert W. “Bob” Packwood papers

The Robert W. “Bob” Packwood papers comprise the records of the Dorchester Conference started by then-Oregon state representative Robert Packwood, legislative material generated and received by Packwood’s office during his five terms as a United States Senator from Oregon, material related to his campaigns, press and public relations material, personal/political files, and autobiographical writings.

Bob Packwood was born in Portland, Oregon in 1932. He attended Grant High School in Portland and graduated from Willamette University in 1954 with a degree in political science. As an undergraduate, he served as an officer in the Young Republicans Club and worked on Mark O. Hatfield’s successful bid for the Oregon legislature.Bob Packwood

After graduation, Packwood was awarded a prestigious Root-Tilden Scholarship to attend New York University Law School. As a law student, he won a first-round national moot court competition and was elected student body president. In 1957, Packwood worked as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Chief Justice Harold Warner in Salem, and subsequently found work in 1958 with Portland law firm Koerner, Young, McColloch and Dezendorf. He became a Republican precinct committeeman in 1959 and was named Republican Party Chairman of Multnomah County the following year.

At the age of thirty-one, Packwood successfully ran for the Oregon legislature, becoming the state’s youngest legislator when he began his term as a state representative from Portland in January 1963. The following year, Representative Packwood gained political notoriety by working with business groups and party leaders to successfully recruit, train, and coordinate GOP candidates for the state legislature in the 1964 general election. His strategy allowed the Oregon House to become the only legislative chamber in the country to switch to GOP control that year, despite a landslide election for Democrats across the nation.

As chair of the House Local Government and Elections Committee, Packwood worked to create single-member districts in Oregon, a measure adopted after he left the state legislature in 1967. In 1965, Packwood founded the Dorchester Conference, a state-wide meeting of Republican politicians and activists on the coast in Lincoln City, Oregon, with the goal of mobilizing and energizing moderate Republicans within the Oregon Republican Party.

In 1968, Packwood won the Republican nomination in Oregon to run against four-time incumbent U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. In a close race, Packwood defeated Morse, becoming the youngest member of the U.S. Senate at age thirty-six.

Packwood’s early legislative efforts include introducing the Senate’s first national (pro)-abortion legislation, advocating to abolish the seniority system within the U.S. Senate and the championing of successful environmental conservation efforts in Oregon. His environmental achievements culminated in the passage of legislation to preserve Cascade Head (1973), Hells Canyon (1975), French Pete (1978) and the Columbia Gorge (1985) in Oregon. Packwood served as chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, the campaign arm of the Senate (1977-1979; 1981-1983), where he skillfully worked to increase the fundraising capacity of the GOP, aiding the election victories of several GOP Senators during the late 1970’s and early 1980’s.

During the Presidency of Ronald Reagan, Packwood chaired both the Commerce Committee (1981-1985) and Finance Committee (1985-1987). As a member and chair of the Commerce Committee, he successfully passed legislation to deregulate several industries, including airline, trucking, railroad, and telecommunications. As chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, Packwood was instrumental in proposing and guiding a bipartisan effort to pass the 1986 Tax Reform Act.

For more information about the Packwood papers and access to this collection, please see the finding aid.


Writers of the World, Unite!

November is National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)—the goal is to actually write an entire novel in one month! National Novel Writing Month is also a nonprofit organization that “…believes in the transformational power of creativity. We provide the structure, community, and encouragement to help people find their voices, achieve creative goals, and build new worlds—on and off the page.”  Thousands of writers across the nation and the world get together in libraries, bookstores, community centers and/or virtually to support one another’s writing.  Hundreds of novels written during NaNoWriMo have been traditionally published such as Sara Gruen’s Water for Elephants, Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus, and Hugh Howey’s Wool. In honor of all the novel writers out there, we offer you a short list of novels about novelists for your reading pleasure! Check out our WU Reads Reading Guide.


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Jasmin Darznik

Jasmin Darznik
Please join us for the third and final event of the Fall 2018 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University, a reading by Iranian-American memoirist and novelist Jasmin Darznik. The reading will take place on Thursday, November 8, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. The event is free and open to the public, and books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

Jasmin is the author of a New York Times bestselling memoir, The Good Daughter: A Memoir of My Mother’s Hidden Life, about her discovery of her mother’s teenage marriage and a half-sister left behind in Iran following the 1979 Islamic Revolution. This past spring, she published her first novel, Song of a Captive Bird, which fictionalizes the real-life story of Farough Farrokzhad, a trailblazing poet who is considered the godmother of Iranian feminism.

Born in Tehran before coming to America at five years old, Jasmin holds an MFA in fiction from Bennington College and a Ph.D. in English from Princeton University. Now a professor of English and creative writing at California College of the Arts, she lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her family.

Here’s what the New York Times Book Review has to say about her novel: “Song of a Captive Bird is a complex and beautiful rendering of [a] vanished country and its scattered people; a reminder of the power and purpose of art; and an ode to female creativity under a patriarchy that repeatedly tries to snuff it out.”

Need more enticement? Read one of Jasmin’s essays here or listen to her discuss her memoir on NPR here.