Faculty Colloquium: Leslie Dunlap

Please join us next Friday, December 1, at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenters: Leslie Dunlap, Continuing Professor in History, Film Studies, Women and Gender Studies, American Ethnic Studies Leslie Dunlap

Title: “Outraged Womanhood” and The Campaign to Close Ft. Gaston: Reckoning with the Rape Culture of American Empire

In the early 1890s, Hupa activist William E. Beckwith and Dorcas Spencer, a white woman reformer, effectively closed down a military post based on an exposé of sexual violence, yet outside of Hupa and California history, the story is little known. This paper documents and analyzes their campaign against military management of the Hoopa Reservation in northwestern California, and the broader critique they posed of sexual violence and American expansion. It finds that U.S. military authorities’ response to Beckwith and Spencer, alongside the hundreds of pages of testimony the investigation generated, provides some of the strongest evidence of the rape culture they identified. The talk raises a series of questions for discussion about how to interpret language steeped in the gender and generic conventions of the time; the limits of sources generated and collected as part of the colonizing process and the nature of the colonial archive; and how to weigh consent, given the era’s (and our own) debates about the conditions that enable consent, especially in the violent context of military occupation at that time.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Tommy Pico Reading

Please join us for the final event of the Fall 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by Tommy Pico. The reading will take place on Tuesday, November 14th, at 7:00 p.m. in the Hatfield Room (2nd floor of Hatfield Library) and is free and open to the public.

Tommy “Teebs” Pico is author of the books IRL (Birds, LLC, 2016), Nature Poem (Tin House Books, 2017), and Junk (forthcoming 2018 from Tin House Books). He was a Queer/Art/Mentors inaugural fellow, 2013 Lambda Literary fellow in poetry, a 2017 NYSCA/NYFA Fellow in Poetry from the New York Foundation for the Arts, and has been profiled in Fusion, Nylon, and the New Yorker. Originally from the Viejas Indian reservation of the Kumeyaay nation, he now lives in Brooklyn where he co-curates the reading series Poets With Attitude (PWA) with Morgan Parker at the Ace Hotel, co-hosts the podcast Food 4 Thot, and is a contributing editor at Literary Hub. @heyteebs

To give you a sense of his work, you’ll find a brief but descriptive review of Pico’s second collection, Nature Poem, from Publishers Weekly below:

“Pico (IRL) centers his second book-length poem on the trap of conforming to identity stereotypes as he ponders his reluctance to write about nature as a Native American. This is “fodder for the noble savage/ narrative,” he writes as ignorant people ask, “do I feel more connected to nature/ bc I’m NDN.” Other similarly problematic expectations are wryly discussed: “An NDN poem must reference alcoholism, like// I started drinking again after Mike Brown and Sandra Bland and CharlestonI felt so underwater it made no sense to keep dry.” As an extension of this dilemma, Pico poses questions about what is natural human behavior: Is it natural for a football player to assault his girlfriend? Is colonialism natural? What about the feeling one gets while listening to Beyoncé’s “Mine”? Pico’s alter-ego “Teebs” remains in constant motion, leaping from the dentist’s office to drag queen karaoke night to the movie theater: “I’m an adult I only let myself have/ candy at the movies/ so I’ve been going to the movies A LOT.” In making the subliminal overt, Pico reclaims power by calling out microaggressions and drawing attention to himself in the face of oppression, “the way the only thing more obvious than your body/ is leaving yr shirt on in the pool.” (May)

https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-941040-63-8

If you have any questions about the event, please contact Danielle Deulen at dcdeulen@willamette.edu.


Faculty Colloquium: Susik and Spalti

Please join us next Friday, November 17, at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenters: Abigail Susik, Associate Professor of Art History and Mike Spalti, Associate University Librarian for Systems
SpaltiSusik
Title: “Pedagogy talk: Teaching with Digital Archives, Skype, Cell Phones and other Tech Stuff”

This joint presentation and discussion will cover tools and methods for enhancing student experience in the classroom with digital technology. We will discuss how digital archives are constructed as well as ways in which they might be employed for courses. We will also present some examples of past experiences teaching with Skype guest lectures, using cell phones for class activities, and other pedagogical resources using the web.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Janet Lorenzen

Please join us next Friday, November 10, at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester.

Presenter: Janet Lorenzen, Assistant Professor of Sociology
Title: “Addressing Climate Change at the Ballot: Challenges to Copying the Marriage Equality Movement”Janet Lorenzen

This talk draws on 58 interviews conducted between May 2015 and August 2017 with Oregon state: legislators, legislative staff members, environmental leaders, and professional lobbyists. Pro-environmental lobbyists were particularly keen to point out that marriage equality had succeeded in Oregon as a ballot measure. And they kept asking, why can’t we do that with a policy to address climate change? This talk discusses the possibilities and challenges of making Cap and Trade (aka the Clean Energy Jobs Bill, SB1070) into a ballot measure in Oregon in 2018.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Celebrating National Aviation Month

People dreamt about the miracle of flight long before the American aviation pioneers, the Wright brothers, were born…remember the sketches of Leonardo da Vinci’s famed flying machine?  It is fascinating to think back to a time when airplanes were only vague dreams and to consider the hard work, ingenuity, creativity, intelligence, determination, and courage of the men and women who made aviation more than a flight of fancy!  November is National Aviation Month, which gives us an opportunity to celebrate and explore the history of aeronautics.

In recognition of National Aviation Month, we have listed a few of the aviation-related books available in the Hatfield Library on our WU Reads Reading Guide.  Enjoy!

You haven’t seen a tree until you’ve seen its shadow from the sky.–Amelia Earhart

(Image based off of NASA National Aviation Day Poster)


Gaetano DeLeonibus, Faculty Colloquium

Gaetano DeLeonibus

Please join us next Friday, October 27, at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester and the second in our Pedagogy/Digital Humanities series.

Presenter: Gaetano DeLeonibus, Professor of French and Francophone Studies
Title: “Digitizing André Breton’s 17th-Century Carib-French Dictionary”

I attended a week-long intensive workshop (June 5-9, 2017), “Text Encoding Fundamentals and their Application,” an introduction to the theory and practice of encoding texts for the humanities. More specifically, the workshop introduced the non-initiate to the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding original texts in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. During the workshop, I began to encode several pages of a 17th-century Carib-French dictionary with the XML Editor Oxygen.

This presentation will first give an overview of Breton’s dictionary, then delve into my experience at the workshop, and describe the use I’ve been making of the text and project in FREN 336.

Students are welcome and treats will be provided. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Brightly Dawning Day

You are invited to a staged reading of the latest iteration of Brightly Dawning Day, a play originally devised by the faculty and students of the department of Theatre, in consultation with Professor Chasar and his students, during the 2012-2013 season.

The play celebrates the life of Abigail Scott Duniway and her fight to gain Oregon women the right to vote. The play is equal parts performance piece, pop-culture mashup, and history play, and is a lot of fun!  The reading will run approximately 60 minutes, and will be followed by a script development talkback.

This will be in the Hatfield Room and will start at 7 pm THIS WEDNESDAY, 10/25.

Additional details and photos are available at:

Literary Reading with Mike Scalise

Please join us for the second event of the Fall 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by Mike Scalise.  The reading will take place on Tuesday, October 24th, at 7:00 p.m. in the Hatfield Room (2nd floor of Hatfield Library) and is free and open to the public.

Scalise’s memoir, The Brand New Catastrophe, was the recipient of the Center for Fiction’s 2014 Christopher Doheny Award.  Scalise’s story begins when a ruptured pituitary tumor leaves him with the hormone disorder acromegaly at age 24, and he must navigate a new, alien world of illness maintenance. His mother, who has a chronic heart condition and a flair for drama, serves as a complicated model. Ultimately, it is a moving, funny exploration of how we define ourselves by the stories we choose to tell.

Mike Scalise’s work has appeared in the New York TimesWall Street Journal, Agni, Indiewire, Ninth Letter, Paris Review Daily, and other places.  He is an 826DC advisory board member, has received fellowships and scholarships from Bread Loaf, Yaddo, and the Ucross Foundation, and was the Philip Roth Writer in Residence at Bucknell University.

PRAISE FOR THE BRAND NEW CATASTROPHE:

“His way is with humor, optimism, courage and probing introspection, the very characteristics—combined with crisp prose and a rare and innately interesting medical condition—that make this a winning literary debut.” —The New York Times Book Review

“An offbeat, witty memoir. . . Scalise is unsparing in recounting his reaction to his diagnosis while keeping the reader engaged in a story about catastrophe. . . Sensitive and well-written.”
Publishers Weekly

“In his memoir The Brand New Catastrophe, Mike Scalise meditates with crackling wit and self-awareness on chronic illness, family, and the clichés of catastrophe stories.”—Kenyon Review

“The effects of illness on self-image and its gravitational pull on family, friends, and spouse are touchingly detailed in this upbeat health memoir.” Booklist review

“Despite the seriousness of the subject, The Brand New Catastrophe manages to be as funny as it is smart about mortality, the fragility of our bodies, and understanding the worst things that happen to us.”—Buzzfeed Books

“The Brand New Catastrophe reveals the human experience of acromegaly with a beautiful and skillful clarity, rendering the rare and misunderstood disorder with an intimate, personal grace.” —Literary Hub

Image source: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6873239.Mike_Scalise

 


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Mike Scalise

Please join us for the second event of the Fall 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by Mike Scalise. The reading will take place on Tuesday, October 24th, at 7:00 p.m. in the Hatfield Room (2nd floor of Hatfield Library) and is free and open to the public.

Scalise’s memoir, The Brand New Catastrophe, was the recipient of the Center for Fiction’s 2014 Christopher Doheny Award. Scalise’s story begins when a ruptured pituitary tumor leaves him with the hormone disorder acromegaly at age 24, and he must navigate a new, alien world of illness maintenance. His mother, who has a chronic heart condition and a flair for drama, serves as a complicated model. Ultimately, it is a moving, funny exploration of how we define ourselves by the stories we choose to tell.

Mike Scalise’s work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Agni, Indiewire, Ninth Letter, Paris Review Daily, and other places. He is an 826DC advisory board member, has received fellowships and scholarships from Bread Loaf, Yaddo, and the Ucross Foundation, and was the Philip Roth Writer in Residence at Bucknell University.


Faculty Colloquium: Gaetano DeLeonibus

Please join us Friday, October 27 at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Presenter: Gaetano DeLeonibus, Professor of French and Francophone StudiesGaetano DeLeonibus
Title: “Digitizing André Breton’s 17th-Century Carib-French Dictionary”

I attended a week-long intensive workshop (June 5-9, 2017), “Text Encoding Fundamentals and their Application,” an introduction to the theory and practice of encoding texts for the humanities. More specifically, the workshop introduced the non-initiate to the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding original texts in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. During the workshop, I began to encode several pages of a 17th-century Carib-French dictionary with the XML Editor Oxygen.

This presentation will first give an overview of Breton’s dictionary, then delve into my experience at the workshop, and describe the use I’ve been making of the text and project in FREN 336.

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators