Library News

Thanksgiving Break Hours

The Hatfield Library has special hours during Thanksgiving.

Wed, Nov. 27     7:45 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Thur – Sat, Nov. 28 – 30     CLOSED
Sun, Dec. 1   1 p.m. – 2 a.m.

Normal building hours resume Monday, November 26th.  The Hatfield Library staff wish the Willamette Community a most wonderful and safe Thanksgiving Break!

This Week’s Faculty Colloquium: Representing Renaissance Queer Crips

Hobgood_smPlease join us this Friday, November 15th at 2:00 pm in the Library’s
Hatfield Room for a presentation by Professor Allison Hobgood (English Department) on:

Title:  Representing Renaissance Queer Crips

Abstract My latest scholarship explores literature produced by the famous, seventeenth-century poet Andrew Marvell. Specifically, I am interested in a burgeoning theoretical disposition in English Renaissance studies, one that investigates the history and literary representations of disability. In my talk, I use a disability studies framework to show how Marvell’s poetry interprets and makes sense of human variation and bodily difference, from wounds to blindness to castration. I’ll discuss Marvell’s representations of castration, impotency, and non-normative, sexual physicality and then examine how those representations relate to Renaissance medical and cultural ideas about sexualized bodily difference. For example, Marvell’s poem “Upon a Eunuch” might be understood as a kind of disability narrative in which verse is imagined as an alternate means of sexual activity and impregnation; for Marvell, poems become prosthetic objects that enable the eunuch to procreate in ways “typical” able-bodied individuals often do.  In examining Marvell’s meditation on poems as sexual prostheses, my argument also illuminates the useful intersections of sexuality/queer studies and early modern disability studies. Much has been said in the last decade or so about the productive reciprocity between queer and crip identities and theories, though predominately in a modern context: among other things, sexual minorities and people with disabilities share a history of injustice and activist resistance to the prejudicial demand that corporeal “defects” be normalized. This talk aims to open up new conversations around sexualized bodily difference and disability in modernity and, especially, in the context of 17th c England.  

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Brownbag Discussion with Former Staff to Senator Hatfield

BA feature-length documentary film highlighting the leadership and career of the late Senator Mark O. Hatfield will also premiere Tuesday, November 19 in Portland.

In conjunction with this event, the Mark O. Hatfield Library and University Archives are pleased to announce that several former Congressional staff members to Senator Hatfield, including a number of WU Alums, will be reuniting on campus and making themselves available for a conversation about Senator Hatfield.  This will take place on November 18th at 12-1pm in the Hatfield Room of the library. This gathering will provide an opportunity for an informal discussion of the Senator, his career, and most importantly, the staffers’ personal experiences working alongside the Senator through many incredible moments in Oregon and United States history.

Please bring your own lunch and lots of questions for this causal get-together. Light refreshments will be provided.  For additional information please contact Mary McRobinson, University Archivist, 503-370-6764; <mmcrobin@willamette.edu>

Information on The Hatfield Project and documentary film The Gentleman of the Senate: Oregon’s Mark Hatfield, including ticket information, can be found at: http://hatfieldfilm.com

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Hallie Ford Literary Series: New Voices Showcase

Please join us for the final event in the Fall 2013 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette. On Monday, November 18, at 5 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of the library, we will host a New Voices Showcase, featuring poet Emily Kendal Frey and memoirist/essayist Jay Ponteri. The two debut writers will read from and discuss their work and answer questions about the first book experience. The event is free and open to the public. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

Emily Kendal Frey’s first full length poetry collection, The Grief Performance, won the Poetry Society of America’s 2012 Norma Farber First Book Award. She teaches at Portland Community College and The Independent Publishing Resource Center.

Read Emily’s poems here: http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/22629 and here: http://bombsite.com/issues/1000/articles/6252.
Read an interview with her here: http://www.bookslut.com/features/2011_06_017747.php.

Jay Ponteri is the author of the memoir Wedlocked, released in the spring of 2013. He directs the creative writing program at Marylhurst University and is the founder of a summer creative writing camp for high school students. His essay, “Listen to This,” was cited as a Notable Essay of 2009 by the editors of Best American Essays.

Read some of Jay’s recently published work here: http://www.ghostproposal.com/issue3/jayponteri.php.
Read a review of Wedlocked here: http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2013/04/wedlocked-by-jay-ponteri.html.

Or listen to a podcast in which Emily and I discuss his book here: http://latenightlibrary.org/wedlocked/.

Colloqium: Gauging and Strengthening Quantitative Skills at Entry

Please join us this Friday, November 8th at 2:00 pm in the Library’s Hatfield Room for a special presentation by Margot Black, Director, Symbolic and Quantitative Resource Center, Lewis & Clark College. James Friedrich (Department of Psychology) is sponsoring Professor Black’s presentation.Margot_Black_sm

Title: Gauging and Strengthening Quantitative Skills at Entry: New Options for Improving Students’ Course Placement and Academic Success

Abstract: Mathematically underprepared students are a large and growing concern in higher education. This can pose special challenges for small, liberal arts colleges with limited course offerings. Identifying and addressing the needs of these students enhances their success across a wide range of courses in the sciences, humanities, and arts. Doing so also contributes to broader institutional success in terms of graduation rates and retention. If a college admits students with such varied quantitative preparation, I suggest that it bears the responsibility of providing certain resources necessary to help them be successful in their courses. In this talk I will discuss how Lewis & Clark College handles math proficiency and placement testing as well as options for remediation for those students who need it most. Such placement and support efforts ultimately contribute to the academic success of all students, including those initially seen as having strong quantitative preparation.

Update for the New Catalog

orbis-exlibrisThe shared catalog of the Orbis Cascade Alliance, known more commonly as SUMMIT, has had some major changes lately.

The second of the four “phases” of the change in catalogs has begun.  The second group of libraries have begun to upload their old local catalog content into the new shared catalog.  The go-live date for the new libraries to publicly appear in the new catalog is December.

Why is this significant?  The second group of libraries is very large, so a sizable chunk of new library records will appear in the new catalog around December.  This will increase the amount of materials that one can borrow through the new catalog interface instead of being bounced to the old Summit catalog system.  In essence, this will make one’s use of the new system more efficient and ultimately more pleasant.  As more libraries join, the need to use the old catalog will naturally decrease.

Libraries in each group (cohort) are listed below along with their go-live dates.

It is important to remember that a major purpose for this new catalog is to remove the need for local catalogs for each institution.  We are attempting to share one catalog resource with 37 member institutions.

Cohort plan for the Shared ILS implementation

Cohort 1 (Go-Live June 2013)
Linfield College
Marylhurst University
Pacific University
University of Washington
Western Washington University
Willamette University
Cohort 2 (Go-Live December 2013)
Concordia University
Eastern Washington University
Evergreen State College
Lewis & Clark College
Portland Community College
Reed College
Saint Martin’s University
Seattle Pacific University
University of Idaho
Warner Pacific College
Washington State University
Cohort 3 (Go-Live June 2014)
Clark College
Mt Hood Community College
Oregon Health & Science University
Oregon Institute of Technology
Portland State University
Southern Oregon University
University of Oregon
University of Portland
University of Puget Sound
Western Oregon University

Cohort 4 (Go-Live December 2014)
Central Oregon Community College
Central Washington University
Chemeketa Community College
Eastern Oregon University
George Fox University
Lane Community College
Oregon State University
Seattle University
Walla Walla University
Whitman College

Assignment Calculator Tool Updated

We have updated our Assignment Calculator tool to offer even more accountability and support to help you complete your assignments from start to finish.

The assignment calculator is a simple tool that students and faculty can use to help calculate when parts of a research paper or assignment should be worked on and completed.  Basically, all you need to do is plug in the beginning date of an assignment and the due date, and it does the rest for you!

Then the calculator lists all of the steps needed to complete your assignment and when each step should be done.  Below is an example.  This is a wonderful tool to help with time management!

Last year we used a bare bones structure, as outlined in our blog entry.  This year you can create an account which will email you notification of what you should be doing, the days left to complete the step, and the time you should spend on this step.

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Below is an example of what you could expect to see from the Assignment Calculator tool.

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Searching Specific Journal Titles in Ebsco

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Here’s a trick of the trade that you might find helpful.  Many of our databases can search within specific journals, such as the Ebsco databases (e.g. Academic or Business Source Premier).  If a journal is covered (indexed) in Ebsco, you can browse through that journal by year or volume/issue number.  Better yet, you can search within that specific journal .  Here’s how…

Click PUBLICATIONS at the top of the screen, type in your journal title under BROWSING, and click the BROWSE button.  You will get a list of journals that fit your search criteria.

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Click the title of the journal you’re after.  You will have the option to search within this specific journal or browse through it by year or volume/issue.

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If you choose to search within a specific journal, you will see the initials JN which stands for “journal” added to the search box followed by the journal title in quotes.  The example below is for the journal called JAMA, which is an acronym for Journal of the American Medical Association.  The full title of the journal is called JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association.  You can also search within several journals at one time in Ebsco databases.

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Bamboo Musical Instrument Exhibit: Sounds of Harmony Series

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Please visit our temporary exhibit Sounds of Harmony, which will be on display until November 3rd outside of the Archives & Special Collections entrance.  This display of traditional bamboo musical instruments complements the talks and music demonstrations related to the Music in the Reconstruction of Identity and Healing/Therapy of the Modern Mind-and-Heart series.

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Dynamics and Problems of Using Games to Teach

Please join us this Friday, November 1st at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for a presentation by Frederick J. Oerther, III, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics.

Title: Dynamics and Problems of Using Games to Teachoerthersmall

Brief Description: This presentation will argue for the usefulness of games as an educational device. We begin by discussing the nature of games and describing the student’s “game experience” in the classroom. Then we will make some assertions about how the game experience might be expected to contribute to the learning process – including the leveraging of scholastic motivations that games may offer on the basis of social and phenomenological factors. The features and properties of a specific form of game, which may be most useful in the classroom, called the “Fully Human Interactive Game,” are surveyed. We conclude with a discussion of some of the problems which may accompany using games to teach.