Third University Librarian Candidate

The Mark O. Hatfield Library is announcing the third candidate for the University Librarian position, Annie Downey.

Dr. Downey served as a Reference, Instruction, and Outreach Librarian, as the Instructional Unit Manager, and then as Head of Research and Instructional Services at the University of North Texas; since 2012 she has been the Director of Research Services at the Reed College Library.

Faculty and staff are encouraged to attend the faculty forum on Wednesday, Oct 7th at 4:15pm in the Hatfield Library.

Students are encouraged to attend the student forum on Thursday, Oct 8th at 11:45am in the Hatfield room.

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Second University Librarian Candidate

The Mark O. Hatfield Library is announcing the second candidate for the University Librarian position, Craig Milberg.

Mr. Milberg began his library career as Systems & Acquisitions Librarian for Credit Suisse, and later served as Global Head of Information Systems Support, and as project Manager & Business Analyst there; since 2009 he has served as the Assistant Director for Discovery Systems in the E.H.Little Library at Davidson College.

Faculty and staff are encouraged to attend the faculty forum on Monday, Oct 5th at 4:15pm in the Hatfield Library.

Students are encouraged to attend the student forum on Tuesday, Oct 6th at 11:45am in the Hatfield room.

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First Candidate for University Librarian

The Mark O. Hatfield Library is announcing the first candidate for the University Librarian position, Patricia Tully.

​Ms. Tully has served, among other positions, as Head of Technical Services in the Musselman Library at Gettysburg College; as Head of Technical Services in the Hilles ​and Lamont Libraries at Harvard University; and as first Associate University Librarian and then University Librarian at Wesleyan University.

Students are encouraged to attend the student forum this Thursday,  October 1st, at 11:45am in the Hatfield room.

Faculty and staff are encouraged to attend the faculty and staff forum later that day on October 1st at 4:15pm in the Hatfield Room.

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Hallie Ford Literary Series: Reginald Dwayne Betts

Please join us for the first event in the Fall 2015 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a reading by acclaimed writer Reginald Dwayne Betts on Wednesday, October 7. NOTE TIME CHANGE: The event will take place at 7:00 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.
Reginald Betts
Recently the subject of a feature story on the Huffington Post, Betts has been at the forefront of national conversations about mass incarceration and the U.S. penal system. Arrested for carjacking as a sixteen-year-old, he was certified as an adult and sentenced to nine years in prison. During his time in a series of maximum-security facilities, he began writing seriously and has since become an award-winning poet and memoirist, as well as a national advocate for juvenile justice. In 2012, President Obama named him to the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Betts is the author of two volumes of poetry, Shahid Reads His Own Palm, winner of the Beatrice Hawley Award, and Bastards of the Reagan Era, released this fall by Four Way Books. His memoir, A Question of Freedom: A Memoir of Learning, Survival, and Coming of Age in Prison, won the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work.

Read one of his poems here. And watch a video of him discussing his new book of poetry here.

This event is co-sponsored by the College Colloquium program, and the Departments of English and Politics. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

I hope to see you there.

Scott Nadelson
Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Chair, Department of English
(503) 370-6290
snadelso@willamette.edu


Faculty Colloquium: Transformational Resilience Workshop

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Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, October 2nd at a special time, 2:00 to 5:00 in the Hatfield Room for our fourth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Sue Koger, Professor of Psychology and
Bob Doppelt, Executive Director of The Resource Innovation Group

Title: Transformational Resilience Workshop

Abstract:

Climate change is often thought of as an environmental problem. This is a profound misunderstanding. Climate change is a profound threat to the mental and physical health and psycho-social-spiritual wellbeing of humanity.
This interactive workshop will begin by explaining how a warming planet will adversely affect the mental and physical health of individuals as well as the psycho-social-spiritual wellbeing of organizations, communities, and entire societies. The majority of the workshop will describe the principles and skills of the Resilient Growth model developed by a team of trauma treatment and resilience building specialists that can be used to help individuals and groups cope with and use climate-enhanced adversities to learn, grow and thrive rather than harm themselves or others. Participants will learn and practice a few of the simple skills involved with the model.

They will leave with a clear sense of the threats to individual and psychosocial wellbeing that lie ahead. They will also understand the core elements of a preventative psycho-social-spiritual resilience building model that can help themselves and others learn how to cope with climate-enhanced and other types of traumas and stresses in ways that actually increase personal and collective wellbeing and the condition of the natural environment.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Ann Copeland Papers

We’re highlighting the Virginia Furtwangler aka Ann Copeland papers from the Archives and Special Collections.

Virginia (Walsh) Furtwangler (1932-) is an American-Canadian author, writing under the name Ann Copeland. She was born and raised in Hartford, Connecticut. She attended the Catholic University of American and received her Ph.D. in Modern Literature from Cornell University. Furtwangler spent 13 years as an Ursuline nun, teaching English literature in both high school and college. Her experience as a nun provided inspiration for many of her short stories including the collection in The Golden Thread.

More at: http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4799

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Faculty Colloquium: Doing Disability Studies

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, September 25th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Allison Hobgood, Associate Professor of English

Title: Doing Disability Studies: Equity and Justice Through the Arts and Humanities
Hobgood
Abstract:

“Doing Disability Studies: Equity and Justice Through the Arts and Humanities” invites listeners to consider the role of disability studies in higher education and as an academic pursuit that supports social justice. Specifically, Allison P. Hobgood will explore the power of disability studies in the Humanities, discuss its history and current iterations, and offer some examples of how disability studies helps make our world a more just, inclusive, and equitable place.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Banned Books 2015

banned-bks-2015Banned Books Week for 2015 is held Sept 27-Oct 3. Celebrate your freedom to read by reading a book from our Banned Books display, which will be on display from Sept 25th throughout October on the first floor of the library.  We encourage you to check them out!

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read.  It highlights the value of free and open access to information, and brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

FUN FACTS:

Over this past decade, 5,099 challenges were reported to the Office for Intellectual Freedom. These are the top five reasons…

1,577 challenges due to “sexually explicit” material
1,291 challenges due to “offensive language”
989 challenges due to materials deemed “unsuited to age group”
619 challenged due to “violence”‘
361 challenges due to “homosexuality”
(Source: http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10)

 

2014

The top ten most frequently challenged books last year include:

1)      The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie

Reasons: anti-family, cultural insensitivity, drugs/alcohol/smoking, gambling, offensive language, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group, violence. Additional reasons: “depictions of bullying”

2)      Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

Reasons: gambling, offensive language, political viewpoint. Additional reasons: “politically, racially, and socially offensive,” “graphic depictions”

3)      And Tango Makes Three, Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell

Reasons: Anti-family, homosexuality, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “promotes the homosexual agenda”

4)      The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison

Reasons: Sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “contains controversial issues”

5)      It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris

Reasons: Nudity, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group. Additional reasons: “alleges it child pornography”

6)      Saga, by Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples

Reasons: Anti-Family, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group. Additional reasons:

7)      The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited to age group, violence

8)      The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “date rape and masturbation”

9)      A Stolen Life, Jaycee Dugard

Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group

10)  Drama, by Raina Telgemeier

Reasons: sexually explicit

 

For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week visit the ALA Banned Books web site:

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek

Source: ALA Banned Books web site


Alumni Weekend, 2015

This is Alumni Weekend at Willamette, and the Hatfield Library has two activities lined up for you!

9:30-10:30am, Hatfield Room (2nd Floor)

Get a behind-the-scenes tour through the Hatfield Library and Archives. See our Digital Productions Lab, Archives, and Book Repair center. Explore some of the Archive’s digital collections and maybe even dig up something from your Willamette days.

10:30-11:30am, Hatfield Room (2nd Floor)

Curious to know how Willamette’s campus evolved from a single building in a field to the beautiful setting we appreciate today? Come hear public historian Dr. William F. Willingham ’66 as he shares information that he has accumulated while researching Willamette’s architectural and natural landscape for his forthcoming book on the subject.

3-4:30pm, Hatfield Room (2nd Floor)

There will be a panel discussion on the Fulbright Program in the Hatfield Room from 3-4:30 p.m.  Jim Nafziger will be the moderator, and several CLA faculty will talk about their Fulbright experiences: Bobby Brewer-Wallin (Silk Road, China), Jeanne Clark (Jordan), Ron Loftus (Japan), Elliot Maltz (The Philippines), Pamela Moro (Thailand), Scott Pike (Greece), and Xijuan Zhou (Silk Road, China).

 

Details at: http://www.willamette.edu/alumni/alumni_weekend/schedule/index.html

 


Pushcarts and Shtetls Come West: The Creation of Historical Memory in Portland

Please join us this Friday, September 11th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Ellen Eisenberg, Dwight & Margaret Lear Professor of American History

Title: Pushcarts and Shtetls Come West: The Creation of Historical Memory in Portland

Abstract:
Eisenberg
“This presentation explores how the razing of a South Portland neighborhood under an Urban Renewal plan in the 1960s led to the birth of a new Oregon Jewish history. In an effort to tell the story of the immigrant experience in the soon-to-be paved over neighborhood, a group of Jewish women stepped forward to collect oral histories, write an original musical, and prepare a series of exhibits. In the process, they created Old South Portland, the product of communal memory and more general American Jewish tropes. Emerging at a time when the Lower East Side had become the iconic version of the East European immigrant story and while Fiddler on the Roof was playing on Broadway and on the silver screen, Old South Portland drew on both, importing elements of these stories and transposing them onto the local landscape.”

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators