Africa Month Display

Throughout the rest of February, the Hatfield Library will display a collection of books and films for students interested in African culture.  This is a snapshot of the current display on the first floor of the Hatfield Library.  All of the library resources can be checked out from this display!

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Willamette Libraries Display

shushing-action-figureThere are not too many places where you can see a “Shushing Librarian Action Figure,” but if you check out the display on the second floor of the Hatfield Library, you’ll see this figure along with some wonderful photos and assorted items relating to the history of Willamette’s libraries.

Libraries at Willamette have a long and interesting history.  The original library was housed on the third floor of the University Hall, later renamed Waller Hall.  When the building was rebuilt after the 1919 fire, the library was relocated to the second floor.

A new library building was built and the library moved from Waller to what is now Smullin.  One Friday in May 1938, classes were cancelled and students and staff moved the collection carrying the books in their arms to the new location. And did you know that in the ’80s, two cats lived in the old Smullin library?  When the library moved to its current location, the cats were adopted by library staff members and taken to their homes.  Any guesses as to the names of the cats?*

moving-the-libraryDo you know when Willamette got its second library? (This excludes the separate music library that was housed in the Fine Arts building).  The J.W. Long Law Library opened in 1967.  In the big flood of 1996, the Law library suffered some major damage.

Photos capture the big move as books were loaded onto carts by students and library staff, and rolled over from the Smullin library to the new Mark O. Hatfield Library in 1986.

The exhibit also includes interesting library artifacts.  You might remember or have seen some of the technology the library used to employ, such as Zip Disks.  But you probably have never seen a 7-inch electric eraser!  We even still have the metal plates that were used to help guide the eraser and avoid damaging the printed ink.  wu-libraries-display

Imagine what it would be like if we were still using card catalogs to look up books, or print indexes for journal articles.  We are very fortunate to have our digital catalogs and databases of today.

A lot has changed for our campus libraries, and they will undoubtedly continue to change to meet the needs of the Willamette Community.  Take this opportunity to view the amazing history of Willamette’s libraries!

*Snooter (a striped “tiger” cat) and Pee Wee (a tortoiseshell cat).  Pee Wee was later renamed to Kit; both cats were female and enjoyed long, happy lives.


Fulbright Scholar Program Panel

Please join us Friday, February 14th at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium panel discussion.

Title: The Fulbright Scholar Program

Abstract: If you have ever thought about applying for a Fulbright–still one of the most highly regarded international exchange programs in the United States and abroad–and have questions, come and talk with our experienced Fulbrighters. What’s it like to take your children to a foreign country on a Fulbright grant? What teaching assignments could you expect? What will you bring to the country you’re living in, and what could you expect to take away from the experience? These questions and many more can all be discussed at this Faculty Colloquium focused on the Fulbright Scholar Program.

Our panelists will include:

Ron Loftus (Japan, twice, Core Scholar Grant)
David McCreery (Jordan, Core Scholar grant and Fulbright-Hays Group Project Abroad leader)
Joyce Millen (Senegal, dissertation award and current Fulbright panelist)
Pamela Moro (Thailand, as a graduate student and Core Scholar)
Scott Pike (Greece, dissertation award)
Todd Silverstein (Norway, Core Scholar grant)
Bill Smaldone (Germany, twice, Core Scholar grant)
Mike Strelow (Spain, Core Scholar grant)

We hope that you will be able to join us.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Playwright Ricardo Bracho, Feb. 19

Please join us for the first event in the Spring 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a reading and talk by acclaimed playwright Ricardo Bracho, on Wednesday, Feburary 19. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.
Born in Mexico City and raised in Los Angeles, Bracho has had a twenty-year career as a playwright, educator, essayist, producer, and dramaturg. His plays, including The Sweetest Hangover, Sissy, A to B, Mexican Psychotic, Puto and Ni Madre, have been produced in California and New York, and have been developed and read nationally.Bracho

“I feel strongly about theatre: that it is intrinsic to democratic dialogue, that it can transform lives and communities,” says Bracho.

Bracho has participated in the NEA/TCG Residency Program for Playwrights, Mabou Mines Resident Artists’ Suite, UCSB Summer Theater Lab, and was Visiting Artist/Scholar at UCSB’s Center for Chicano Studies. He has received grants, commissions, and awards from the Creative Work Fun, Brown University, Magic Theatre/Exploratorium Museum, UC Santa Barbara, and the Center Theater Group, among others. His poems, essays, and play excerpts have been published in IN YOUR FACE, Behind our Backs/Sumt’n to Say, Encylopedia, Cast Out, Corpus and Virgins, and in Guerrillas y Locas. He has also worked extensively in the fields of harm reduction, drug policy/research, HIV service and analysis, and Lati@, gay men of color, and lgbt youth of color organizing with Proyecto ContraSIDA Por Vida, LLEGO, the Harm Reduction Coaliton, the H.I.P.H.O.P. Project (Health in Prison, Health Outta Prison) and Fierce!, among others.

This event is sponsored by the Hallie Ford Chair in Writing and the Departments of English, Theatre, Politics, American Ethnic Studies, and Women and Gender Studies at Willamette University.

For more information, contact:
Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Willamette University
snadelso@willamette.edu
503-370-6290


2013 Tree of Giving Success!

diaryowkIt is with great pleasure that we write to inform you of the success of the 2013 Tree of Giving Book Drive! The Mark O. Hatfield Library, along with the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, the Willamette Bookstore, and YOU successfully collected over 200 books to be divided between Richmond and Hallman Elementary Schools. Donations spanned the K through 5 reading levels from Curious George to Diary of a Wimpy Kid, with Spanish language books as well. Once again the Willamette community has shown true depth of feeling and has helped supplement the library shelves of our local elementary schools.

On January 21 and 23, student athletes and Tree of Giving representatives presented both schools with their new books and participated in a short question and answer session. The Hallman and Richmond students were excited to meet the Willamette student athletes, and to browse the new books added to the library shelves.

Thank you so much for your support and your dedication to keeping Salem’s youth reading.

The Mark O. Hatfield Library, the Willamette Store, and the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee


Faculty Colloquium: Noru Ka Soru Ka

Please join us Friday, February 7th at 2:00 pm in FORD 122 for this week’s Faculty Colloquium. (Please note the change of location.)

Our speaker will be:

Michael Nord, Associate Professor of Music Technology and Education

Title: Noru Ka Soru Ka: New Worknorukasoruka_sm

Abstract: Noru Ka Soru Ka is an international dance-theater and music ensemble featuring Japanese dancers Mao Arata and Makoto Matsushima (also voice), American Mike Nord on guitar and electronics, and Swiss percussionist Georg Hofmann. Friday’s colloquium will present the ensemble’s approach to collective improvisation and feature video recordings of recent performances in the US, Switzerland, and Hong Kong, along with material from a 2013 CD release.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium, Spring Semester Schedule

pdmBelow is the spring semester schedule for the weekly Faculty Colloquium.  Their talks will be held each week in the Hatfield Room which is located on the second floor of the library.  Abstracts and reminders for each talk will be broadcast in advance of each session.  Abstracts and additional information will be linked from this page as they are provided; abstracts are typically supplied the week of the talk.  We hope you will be able to join us.  Comments and questions can be directed to the Faculty Colloquium Coordinators Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer

Jan 31st
Emily Drew:  “Under One Roof: The Effects of Immigration Policy on Latino Families in Oregon”

Feb 7th  
Michael Nord:  “Noru Ka Soru Ka: New Work”

Feb 14   
Pat Alley:  A Session by Fulbright Scholarship Winners

Feb 28 
Alison Fisher:  “Isoprene synthase from heath star moss: A possible window into the evolution and function of isoprene  production by land plants”

Mar 7 
Erik Noftle:  “Personality Change”

Mar 14
Brandi Lazzarini:  “Smooth Moves and Staying Upright: Studying Indicators of Fall Risk in the Walking Motion of Older Adults”  [NB:  Location change to Cone Chapel]

Apr 4
Michelle Bumatay:  “Graphic Novels and Identity in Africa and the Diaspora: A Visual Postcolonial Discourse”

Apr 11 
Scott Nadelson:  “Laughing into the Abyss: Comedy’s Existential Howl!”

Apr 25
Professor of the Year Teaching Presentations


Library catalog down time…

This coming Sunday morning, February 2nd, the library catalog will be unavailable due to a hardware upgrade. The catalog will be unavailable from 12 a.m. until 7 a.m. While the catalog is down, you can still use Summit/Worldcat to look for resources available in the Summit catalog and all of our article databases will still be available.


Take a Book, Leave a Book

take-a-bookIntroducing the new Book Swap bookcase located in the Hatfield Library’s Fish Bowl (24 hour study).  The idea is simple: If you see a book you like, take it… just consider leaving a book in exchange. 

The initiative for this program came from the Hatfield Library’s Reading Group, which has a goal to encourage life long reading habits.  One idea the group had been considering was to create a book exchange area somewhere in the library for books (or dvds, magazines, etc.) that had been donated to the library, but we already owned or didn’t fit with our collection guidelines.  One of the librarians noticed that an “ancient” wooden book cart was on its way to the campus surplus.  The library staff really wanted to reuse the book cart in some fashion, so the thought of reusing it for a Book Swap bookcase occurred to a librarian who had seen a similar arrangement at another university.

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The wooden cart most likely came from the original Willamette Library that was housed in Smullin Hall. Someone from Willamette’s facilities department back in the 1950s or 60s most likely built it.

Over the winter break the wheels were removed, a wood base added, and a fresh coat of paint and customized graphic were given to the former cart.  And voilà!  We now have a creative “new” way to share books.  It is kind of neat to incorporate and reuse such an interesting bit of Willamette’s history.

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The concept for “take a book, leave a book” is not new. Various renditions of this sharing system have existed for many years and occurs nationally.  Salem, for example, has a few similar public “Little Free Library” stations scattered about the city. Willamette University had a similar system several years ago that essentially functioned out of a wicker basket in the Dean’s Office.  The new bookcase in the Fish Bowl makes this much more accessible to students, faculty, staff, and others connected to Willamette.

We encourage our Willamette community to participate in our Take a Book, Leave a Book program.  For comments and questions, please contact Joni Roberts, Associate University Librarian for Public Services and Collection Development,  jroberts@willamette.edu.

 

 

 

 


Faculty Colloquium: Immigration Policy

Please join us this Friday, January 31st at 2:00 pm in the Library’s
Hatfield Room for this semester’s opening Faculty Colloquium. Our speaker will be:

Emily Drew, Associate Professor of Sociology and American Ethnic Studies

Title: Under One Roof: The Effects of Drew on Latino Families in Oregon

Abstract: The family, an institution responsible for economic and social stability, should ostensibly be safe from inequalities of the broader society. However, for immigrant families whose members have varied statuses, policy affects opportunities, roles, relationships and cohesion. Through interviews with 31 Latino families from 12 cities in Oregon (80 persons total), I discovered how policy (e.g. Secure Communities, drivers’ licenses) creates “divided fates” among members of one family, living under the same roof. Immigration policy creates and accentuates micro-stratification within Latina/o immigrant families, perpetuating a damaging dichotomy–citizen and not citizen. Consequently, it creates “unequal childhoods,” destabilizes families, and contributes to generational separation and cultural amnesia.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators