Tree of Giving Book Drive

The annual Tree of Giving Book Drive has officially begun.

The Hatfield Library, The Willamette Store and the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee are seeking donations of new or slightly used children’s books to be donated to Highland Elementary School‘s library. We are also looking for hats, gloves and scarves.

The Willamette Store is offering a 25% discount for items purchased for the Book Drive

The last day to donate is Friday, December 18. Items can be dropped off at The Willamette Store, Hatfield Library or Sparks Athletic Center.

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Faculty Colloquium: Water Conflict in the Klamath Basin

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us Friday, November 20th at 3:00 in the Hatfield Room for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.Don Negri

Don Negri, Professor of Economics

Title: Water Conflict in the Klamath Basin

Abstract:

The Klamath Basin in Southern Oregon has been the site of conflict over water resources for more than a decade. The Basin is a microcosm of the conflict over water scarcity that plagues the western US. The conflict is as much about clashing cultures as it is about insufficient water. The Basin is home to four Native American Tribes, four wildlife refuges and a federal irrigation project that provides water to approximately 210,000 acres of farmland. In the 1990’s the Endangered Species Act listed two fish species in the basin that made agricultural water supplies susceptible to cutbacks especially in drought years. Also during the 90’s the Confederated Klamath Tribes began to assert their historical water rights magnifying the threat to agricultural production in the region. Then in 2001, the conflict erupted into violence as the federal government mandated the water supply head gates be closed to protect endangered fish. Since that time the battle over water allocation in the basin has be waged in Congress and the courts with no end in sight.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Popular Reading Collection Suggestions

If you’re going away for Thanksgiving or staying close to campus, why not grab a great book from our Popular Reading Collection which is near the elevator. Here are just a few of the over 350 titles we have to consider:

The lord of Opium
Nancy Farmer, PZ7.F23814 Lor 2013
In 2137, fourteen-year-old Matt is stunned to learn that, as the clone of El Patrón, he is expected to take over as leader of the corrupt drug empire of Opium, where there is also a hidden cure for the ecological devastation faced by the rest of the world.

Eat to live cookbook: 200 delicious nutrient-rich recipes for fast and sustained weight loss, reversing disease, and lifelong health
Joel Fuhrman, RM222.2 .F8395 2013
Filled with nutritious, delicious, and easy-to-prepare recipes for every occasion, the Eat to Live Cookbook shows you how to follow Dr. Fuhrman’s life-changing program as you eat your way to incredible health.

Code name Verity
Elizabeth Wein. PZ7.W4358 Cp 2012
In 1943, a British fighter plane crashes in Nazi-occupied France and the survivor tells a tale of friendship, war, espionage, and great courage as she relates what she must to survive while keeping secret all that she can
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The brides of Rollrock Island
Margo Lanagan, PZ7.L216 Br 2012
On remote Rollrock Island, men go to sea to make their livings–and to catch their wives. The witch Misskaella knows the way of drawing a girl from the heart of a seal, of luring the beauty out of the beast. And for a price a man may buy himself a lovely sea-wife. He may have and hold and keep her. And he will tell himself that he is her master. But from his first look into those wide, questioning, liquid eyes, he will be just as transformed as she. He will be equally ensnared. And the witch will have her true payment.

Drama
Raina Telgemeier Gurihiru, PN6727.T294 D73 2012
Callie rides an emotional roller coaster while serving on the stage crew for a middle school production of Moon over Mississippi as various relationships start and end, and others never quite get going

Spontaneous Happiness
Andrew Weil, RA790 .W45 2011
In just eight weeks you will learn to influence your mood through natural, healthy means; improve your physical and mental health; discover how to sleep better; connect with others; and achieve balance and serenity.

Silver : return to Treasure Island
Andrew Motion, PR6063.O842 S55 2012b
It’s almost forty years after the events of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island:  Jim Hawkins now runs an inn called the Hispaniola on the English coast with his son, Jim, and Long John Silver has returned to England to live in obscurity with his daughter, Natty. Their lives are quiet and unremarkable; their adventures have seemingly ended.
But for Jim and Natty, the adventure is just beginning. One night, Natty approaches young Jim with a proposition: return to Treasure Island and find the remaining treasure that their fathers left behind so many years before. As Jim and Natty set sail in their fathers’ footsteps, they quickly learn that this journey will not be easy.  Immediately, they come up against murderous pirates, long-held grudges, and greed and deception lurking in every corner.

The Dog Stars (Vintage Contemporaries)
Peter Heller, PS3608.E454 D64 2012
Hig somehow survived the flu pandemic that killed everyone he knows. Now his wife is gone, his friends are dead, and he lives in the hangar of a small abandoned airport with his dog, Jasper, and a mercurial, gun-toting misanthrope named Bangley.

But when a random transmission beams through the radio of his 1956 Cessna, the voice ignites a hope deep inside him that a better life exists outside their tightly controlled perimeter. Risking everything, he flies past his point of no return and follows its static-broken trail, only to find something that is both better and worse than anything he could ever hope for.

 

For more great titles, search the library home page (the online catalog) for “popular reading” in quotes.

 

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Faculty Colloquium: Willamette University and Debate in the People’s Republic of China

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Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, November 13th at 3:00 in the Hatfield Room for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Robert Trapp, Professor of Civic Communication and Media, Director of Debate Union

Title:  Willamette University and Debate in the People’s Republic of China
Abstract: For the better part of two decades I have worked to teach debate in the emerging democracies of Central and Eastern Europe and even more closed societies like the People’s Republic of China. All of the programs with which I worked were funded by George Soros and the Open Society Foundation (OSF). Then in 2007, after a decade of working in Central and Eastern Europe, I had the opportunity to direct the instruction of students, teachers, and judges at the FLTRP (Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press) Cup in Beijing, which had the reputation of being the most prestigious English-speaking debate competition in China. I continued to direct the instruction for the FLTRP cup for four more years. Then I applied for a series of small grants from OSF to host instructional workshops for students, teachers, and judges.  In 2012, I applied successfully for an OSF grant of $3,000,000 to create a “sustainable debate program” across many geographic areas in China. The 3-year grant was fully approved.

Debating in China prior to our program was expressly for the purpose of using debate to teach oral English. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the program that we are in the process of completing; its goals and structure as well as the depth and breadth of the program that by all appearances has changed the face of debate in the People’s Republic of China in positive ways.

As always, please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: “A Hindu is white although he is black”

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, November 6th at 3:00 in the Hatfield Room for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Alexander Rocklin, Visiting Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
Alexander Rocklin
Title: “A Hindu is white although he is black”: Hindu Alterity and the Performativity of Religion and Race between the US and the Caribbean

Abstract:

This talk uses the controversies surrounding the racially and religiously enigmatic Ismet Ali, a yogi working in Chicago and New York in the 1920s, as a way to get at the complexities of the interrelatedness of the performativity of religion and race. In examining several moments in which Ali’s “authenticity” as Indian is brought into doubt, it opens up larger questions regarding the global flows of colonial knowledge, racial tropes, and groups of people between India, the US, and the Caribbean. The practices of the yogi persona and its sartorial stylings, particularly the donning of a turban and beard, meant to signify “East Indianness” in the US, were one mode through which “Hindoo” stereotypes were repurposed as models for self-formation by both South Asian and African Americans in the early twentieth century. In passing as “Hindoo,” peoples of color could circumvent the US’s black/white racial binary and the violence of Jim Crow. This act of racial passing, though, was an act of religious passing as well. This talk explores the ways in which, in the early twentieth century US, East Indian “authenticity” only became legible via identificatory practices that engaged with and took on Orientalized stereotypes. However, the ways in which identities had to and could be performed changed with context, as individuals moved across national and colonial lines.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


New Voices Showcase: Rabins & Bernard

Please join us for the third event in the Fall 2015 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a New Voices Showcase, featuring poet Alicia Jo Rabins and fiction writer Sean Bernard. The reading and Q&A will take place on Monday, November 9, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. It is free and open to the public, and books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

A writer, composer, performer and Torah scholar, Alicia Jo Rabins won the 2015 American Poetry Review/Honickman First Book Prize. Her first volume of poetry, Divinity School, was published this October. She tours internationally with her band, performing Girls in Trouble, an indie-folk song cycle about the complicated lives of Biblical women. A Kaddish for Bernie Madoff, her one-woman chamber-rock opera, was named one of Portland’s best theatre performances of 2014 by the Willamette Week.

Sean Bernard is the author of two books released in the last year: a novel, Studies in the Hereafter, and a story collection, Desert Sonorous, which won the 2014 Juniper Prize from the University of Massachusetts Press. He lives and teaches creative writing in Southern California, where he serves as Fiction Editor for The Los Angeles Review and also edits the journal Prism Review. He holds degrees from Oregon State University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and his fiction has appeared in Epoch, CutBank, LIT, Glimmer Train, and Sequestrum. In 2012, he received a literary fellowship from the NEA.

Read one of Alicia’s poems here: https://aprweb.org/poems/florida; or listen to her songs here: http://www.girlsintroublemusic.com/listen/.

Read an interview with Sean here: http://therumpus.net/2015/10/the-rumpus-interview-with-sean-bernard/.

Scott Nadelson
Associate Professor of English;
Department Chair of English


Faculty Colloquium, Environmental Health

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Please join us this Friday, October 30th at 3:00 in the Hatfield Room for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Joyce Millen, Associate Professor of Anthropology
Barbara Stebbins-Boaz, Associate Professor of Biology
Title: Environmental Health Research Collaborative Takes Flight on a LARC

Abstract: Environmental health is concerned with the air we breathe, the water we drink, the soil upon which we grow crops, the food we consume, and the products we use on our bodies, in our homes, and at work. It is both a discipline and a social movement that aims to promote human health and wellbeing. Effective environmental health research—and activism—requires knowledge of myriad intersections between nonhuman and human organisms, and natural and built environments. In this colloquium, we will introduce our ongoing exploration of environmental health work, in the lab, on the road, and in the classroom. We will present highlights from our LARC summer research collaborative which took us up and down the Willamette Valley, visiting relevant agencies and laboratories and closely investigating local environmental health concerns, including pesticide use in parks and agricultural fields, diesel fuel use, BPAs in food and water containers, toxins in daycare settings, the osteosarcoma outbreak in West Salem, and neurotoxins used in dry cleaning. We will also share ways in which we have integrated environmental health themes in our courses and how we envision expanding Willamette’s contribution to this work.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


An Uncanny Evening

Please join us for the second event in the Fall 2015 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette: “An Uncanny Evening,” a performance of stories from The Uncanny Reader, edited by Marjorie Sandor, on Wednesday, October 28. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.

The Uncanny Reader is the first anthology of its kind to focus on the literary uncanny, “from the deeply unnerving to the possibly supernatural,” with stories by writers as various as Edgar Allan Poe, Shirley Jackson, and Karen Russell, as well as stories by lesser known writers from around the world. What the stories share is “an increasingly unstable sense of self, home, and planet.”

Marjorie Sandor is the author of four books, most recently The Late Interiors: A Life Under Construction. Her story collection Portrait of My Mother, Who Posed Nude in Wartime, won the 2004 National Jewish Book Award in Fiction, and an essay collection, The Night Gardener: A Search for Home, won the 2000 Oregon Book Award for literary nonfiction. She is a professor of creative writing at Oregon State University.

She will be joined this evening by a troupe of musicians and actors who will perform excerpts from several stories, complete with eerie music, talking dolls, and visits from Sigmund Freud. Perfect preparation for Halloween.

Watch a trailer for The Uncanny Reader here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H84Bhp2r1gQ


An Uncanny Evening with Marjorie Sandor and Friends

Please join us for the second event in the Fall 2015 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette: “An Uncanny Evening,” a performance of stories from The Uncanny Reader, edited by Marjorie Sandor, on Wednesday, October 28. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.

The Uncanny Reader is the first anthology of its kind to focus on the literary uncanny, “from the deeply unnerving to the possibly supernatural,” with stories by writers as various as Edgar Allan Poe, Shirley Jackson, and Karen Russell, as well as stories by lesser known writers from around the world. What the stories share is “an increasingly unstable sense of self, home, and planet.”

Marjorie Sandor is the author of four books, most recently The Late Interiors: A Life Under Construction. Her story collection Portrait of My Mother, Who Posed Nude in Wartime, won the 2004 National Jewish Book Award in Fiction, and an essay collection, The Night Gardener: A Search for Home, won the 2000 Oregon Book Award for literary nonfiction. She is a professor of creative writing at Oregon State University.

She will be joined this evening by a troupe of musicians and actors who will perform excerpts from several stories, complete with eerie music, talking dolls, and visits from Sigmund Freud. Perfect preparation for Halloween.

Watch a trailer for The Uncanny Reader here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H84Bhp2r1gQ.

Post Courtesy of Scott Nadelson.


Faculty Colloquium: My Case is Altered

 

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, October 2nd at 3:00 in a special place, Room 202 in the M. Lee Pelton Theatre Building for our fifth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.
Bobby Brewer-Wallin, Associate Professor of Theatre and
Struan Leslie, Director of My Case Is Altered. Mellon Learning by Creating Visiting Artist.(Follow this link to see a video about this upcoming production)
 
Title:  My Case is Altered: Tales of a Roaring Girl

Abstract:
My Case is Altered: Tales of a Roaring Girl explores and transforms current perceptions of race, class, gender, and identity by challenging the audience to consider their pre-conceived notions about an actor performing outside and beyond her normative roles. Solo performer, Lisa Gaye Dixon—a black woman born and raised in middle America—investigates her connections to the world of theatre and the world at large via disparate texts, personalities, and topics ancient & modern. This personal journey of transformation and self-recognition ranges from Queen Elizabeth I, Margaret Thatcher, & Julius Caesar to American Football, Classical Theatre, & Hip Hop music. This colloquium presentation focuses on the process of developing a new solo performance work, working with collaborators across four time zones and two continents, and the ways visual image research is used to make direct connections to the text and to the body.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

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