Research Award $500 Cash Prize!

Money, Money, Money…

Have you written and researched an amazing paper this year?  If so, we’ve got good news…the library is sponsoring its annual MOHL Research Award and you may be eligible to win a $500 cash prize! The award will be given for a student paper in any discipline that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources.  Last year’s award winner was then junior Miles Sari’s for his paper “‘Piece of Me’—A Framing Analysis of the Deconstruction and Reconstruction of Britney Spears.”

To be eligible for this award, the paper must have been written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work and in the current academic year (Fall 2013/Spring 2014). For complete details and instructions see:  libmedia.willamette.edu/award.

*Papers done as a senior project but in the junior year are excluded.

research-awards-2014

Faculty Colloquium: Brandi Rowe

Dear Colleagues,
Please join us this Friday, March 14th at 2:00 pm in Cone Chapel for this week’s Faculty Colloquium. (Please note the change of location.)

Our speaker will be: Brandi Row Lazzarini, Associate Professor of Exercise Science

row
Title: Walking and harmony: Studying walking smoothness of older adults using the harmonic ratio.

Abstract:  Similar to the concept of musical harmony, a person’s walking motions can be constructive, or in phase with the base frequency (consonant), or destructive and out of phase with the base frequency (dissonant).  In biomechanics, walking ‘smoothness’ is quantified as the ratio of the amplitude of constructive and destructive acceleration harmonics.  In older adults, walking smoothness breaks down into more dissonant states caused by increased ‘out of phase’ motions, and this breakdown occurs faster in individuals at a higher risk of falling. My current work explores practical aspects of the use of this sort of biomechanical variable, such as whether it is impacted by walking on a treadmill, and whether it can be represented by clinical tests of stepping, which would have implications toward improving clinical assessment of mobility function.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


National Nutrition Month

Image source: nih.gov Nutrition Month
Image source: NIH.gov Nutrition Month

March is National Nutrition Month! After the past few months of holiday meals, you may be motivated to start eating more nutritiously and exercise regularly.  A big emphasis during this month is simply to make INFORMED CHOICES about the food you eat and to develop sound eating and physical activity habits. Remember to not give up on changing your goal of living healthier.  Good habits take a long time to establish (66 days or more).

Here are a few tips taken from EATRIGHT.ORG:

  1. Explore New Foods, Flavors and ‘Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.’ If your food begins to loose its luster, adding more nutrition and pleasure to each meal is as easy as expanding the range of foods you choose. Try one new fruit, vegetable or whole grain every week. Start small by picking a different type of apple, a different color potato or a new flavor of whole-grain rice until you are comfortable picking entirely new things that you’ve never tried or heard of before.
  2. The next time you eat out, choose a restaurant that features ethnic foods from Asia, Europe or Africa. These restaurants often feature menus filled with healthy options that will be new to you.
  3. If you prepare your own meals, add a pinch of this or that to give your regular dishes some additional zing.  Remember, you have about 10,000 taste buds, so don’t be afraid to try something new.

The National Library of Medicine has some great suggestions for eating habits and behaviors:

  1. A food journal is a good tool to help you learn about your eating habits. Keep a food journal for 1 week.
    • Write down what you eat, how much, and what times of day you are eating.
    • Include notes about what else you were doing and how you were feeling, such as being hungry, stressed, tired, or bored. For example, maybe you were at work and were bored. So you got a snack from a vending machine down the hall from your desk.
    • At the end of the week, review your journal and look at your eating patterns. Decide which habits you want to change.
  2. Reflect on your food journal.  Look at your journal and circle any regular or repetitive triggers. Some of these might be:
    • You see your favorite snack in the pantry or vending machine
    • When you watch television
    • You feel stressed by something at work or in another area of your life
    • You have no plan for dinner after a long day
    • You go to work events where food is served
    • You stop at fast-food restaurants for breakfast and choose high fat, high calorie foods
    • You need a pick-me-up toward the end of your workday
  3. Replace your old habits with new ones.
    1. Find health choices for snacks and plan ahead. Take only a small portion, put it in a dish and put the rest away. Eat fruit and yogurt in the mid-afternoon about 3 or 4 hours after lunch.
    2. Eat only when you are hungry. Eating when you are feel worried, tense, or bored also leads to overeating. Instead, call a friend or go for a walk to help you feel better.
    3. Eat Slowly. Eating too quickly leads to overeating when the food you have eaten has not yet reached your stomach and told your brain you are full. You will know you are eating too quickly if you feel stuffed about 20 minutes after you stop eating.
    4. Plan your meals. Know what you will eat ahead of time so you can avoid buying unhealthy foods (impulse buying) or eating at fast-food restaurants.
    5. Get rid of unhealthy foods. Put them out of sight or in hard to reach places.  Replace your candy dish with a bowl of fruit or nuts.
  4. An old saying goes: “Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.”
    1. Breakfast sets the tone for the day. A hearty, healthy breakfast will give your body the energy it needs to get you to lunch.
    2. Plan a good lunch that will satisfy you, and a healthy afternoon snack that will keep you from becoming to hungry before dinner time.
    3. Avoid skipping meals. Missing a regular meal or snack often leads to overeating or making unhealthy choices.

     

Don’t forget that we have a huge selection of books dealing with nutrition.  A few of them are highlighted this month on our WU Reads page.


Faculty Colloquium: Erik Noftle

NoftleDear Colleagues,
Please join us this Friday, March 7th at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium.

Our speaker will be:

Erik E. Noftle, Assistant Professor of Psychology

Title: Are you a moral person? Examining the substance, stability, and outcomes of explicit moral self-views to gain insight into character

Abstract:  Classic work on moral development was focused on information-processing: how people responded to moral dilemmas was diagnostic of the moral person. Recently, the re-invigoration of a long-neglected personality approach regards morality more broadly as related to character (Hill & Roberts, 2010). Although useful frameworks exist for identifying and classifying traits that represent good character (character strengths, Big Five personality subcomponents), the current work examines morality at the broadest, most explicit level. The current study tracked over 200 participants, who are at the outset of the formative period of emerging adulthood, longitudinally across their first two college years. Several questions about moral development were pursued: Do people see themselves as typically behaving morally? Do those views change over time? Are moral self-views fatally biased or can they predict people’s character traits and important outcomes? Results suggest moral self-views capture some character traits but not all, and predict life goals, moral concerns, integrity, and adjustment in revealing ways.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Poet Wendy Willis

Please join us for the second event in the Spring 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University: an Alumni Showcase, featuring WU grad and poet Wendy Willis on Wednesday, March 12. Wendy will read from and discuss her recently published first collection of poems, Blood Sisters of the Republic, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of the library. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store. The event is free and open to the public.wendy_willis

Wendy splits her time between her roles as mother, poet, and advocate for democracy. She is the Executive Director of the Policy Consensus Initiative, a national non-profit organization devoted to improving democratic governance. In addition to publishing poetry and essays in a variety of national and regional journals and serving as an adjunct fellow in poetry at the Attic Institute, Willis has served as a federal public defender and as the law clerk to Chief Justice Wallace P. Carson, Jr. of the Oregon Supreme Court. She graduated magna cum laude from Georgetown Law Center and holds a B.A. from Willamette University. She lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband, his son and her two young daughters.

About Blood Sisters of the Republic, the poet Stanley Plumly says, “Wendy Willis is a poet of serious heart, a fact of enormous importance to the political and personal terms of her first book. While her politics lie in a generosity of spirit, her affections border on the extravagant. There is something wonderfully wild at the center of her poems, a freedom earned by craft. Blood Sisters of the Republic is as much about its local life as it is about national conscience. Plentitude and complexity are the hallmarks of its voice. And love is its signature.”

Sample one of Wendy’s poems here: http://therumpus.net/2013/04/national-poetry-month-day-6-swim-lesson-no-3-by-wendy-willis/.

Or read her essay “On Writing and Subversion” here: http://wendywillisdotme.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/a-poetry-pep-talk-on-writing-and-subversion/

Come celebrate this Willamette success story!

Scott Nadelson
Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Department of English
(503) 370-6290
snadelso@willamette.edu


Edible Book Festival, 2014 Announcement

edible-books-2014

The Mark O. Hatfield Library invites you to participate in the third annual
EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!

Friday, March 14, 2014.  Hatfield Room.

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year.  Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

Some of last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle Public Library, UCLA, and Duke University. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Free to enter– no registration required.  Drop off your entry in the Hatfield Room on March 14 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.  If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display.  Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book until 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

All entries will be on display from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.  Even if you don’t enter, you can cast a vote for your favorite edible book.  At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—David Craig (Biology), Ford Schmidt (Hatfield Library), and a CLA student (tbd) —will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Student Entry
  • Most Literary
  •  Most Creative
  • Punniest
  •  People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners.  For more information and to view all photos of the last two year’s entries, go to:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2013/03/19/edible-book-festival-2013-results/

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2012/04/06/firstedible-books-festival-2012/

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu

Prizes awarded:

  • People’s Choice – “The Monster Book of Monsters” by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman.
  • Best Student Entry – “One Cake to Rule Them All” by Kelsey Kinavey.
  • Most Creative – “Lord of Pies” by Kelly Slaughter.
  • Most Literary – (Tie) “The Picture of Dorian Souffle” by Maureen Ricks; “Lay’s Miserables” by Katie Mariman.
  • Punniest – (Three-way tie) “Their Fries Were Watching Cod” by Sophie Hearn; “Their Eyes Were Watching Cod” by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar; “Pride and Prego Dish” by Liz Butterfield. 
  • Honorable Mention – “Hop on Pop” by Sara Amato.

 

“The Monster Book of Monsters”

Inspired by Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
By J.K. Rowling
Created by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman

People’s Choice

 

 

“One Cake to Rule Them All”

Inspired by The Lord of the Rings By JRR Tolkein
Created by Kelsey Kinavey

Best Student Entry

 

 

  “Lord of the Pies”

Inspired by Lord of the Flies
By William Golding
Created by Kelly Slaughter

Most Creative

  The Picture of Dorian Souffle

Inspired by The Picture of Dorian Gray
By Oscar Wilde
Created by Maureen Ricks

(Tie) Most Literary

 

Lay’s Miserables

Inspired by Les Miserables
By Victor Hugo
Created by Katie Mariman

(Tie) Most Literary

 

Their Fries Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Sophie Hearn

(Tie) Punniest

 

Their Eyes Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar

(Tie) Punniest

Pride and Prego Dish

Inspired by Pride and Prejudice
By Jane Austen
Created by Liz Butterfield

(Tie) Punniest

 

Hop on Pop

Inspired by Hop on Pop
By Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel)
Created by Sara Amato

Honorable Mention

 

 

 


Featuring Health Source

fruit-slcdWe’re are featuring the database Health Source this month in celebration of National Nutrition Month.   It is one of our lesser known electronic resources, but extremely useful if you are researching health or nutritional topics.

Health Source provides the full text to over 270 periodicals covering nutrition, exercise, medical self-care, drugs and alcohol, and much more. You’ll find plenty of scholarly articles in this database, but in addition to the full text offerings, this database indexes and abstracts for over 430 periodicals.

This database also provides full text for over 1,090 pamphlets and 23 books.  Health Source is an Ebsco Host databases, so you may recognize the interface.

ebsco-logoRead our previous blog post about National Nutrition Month.


Faculty Colloquium, February 28th, 2014

Please join us this Friday, February 28th at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium.

Our speaker will be:fisherfull
Alison J. Fisher, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Title:  Isoprene synthase from heath star moss: A possible window into the evolution and function of isoprene production by land plants

Abstract:  Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is the most abundant volatile organic compound (VOC) released from land plants.  Indeed, plants release over 600 million tons of isoprene each year into the atmosphere.  Once airborne, isoprene promotes the production of photochemical smog and other air pollutants and contributes indirectly to global warming.  In many seed plants, the enzyme isoprene synthase catalyzes the production of isoprene from its precursor, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP).  However, the role of isoprene in plant biology remains elusive. While isoprene production by mosses is common, there are no previous reports of enzymatic production of isoprene in a moss.  We isolated and characterized a DMAPP-dependent isoprene synthase from cell-free extracts of heath star moss (Campylopus introflexus), and efforts are underway in our laboratory to clone the mRNA transcript that codes for this novel enzyme.  The discovery of the first isoprene synthase activity from a moss could shed light on the evolution, and possible biological function, of isoprene production in plants.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Africa Month Display

Throughout the rest of February, the Hatfield Library will display a collection of books and films for students interested in African culture.  This is a snapshot of the current display on the first floor of the Hatfield Library.  All of the library resources can be checked out from this display!

africa-2014
africa-2014-2

Willamette Libraries Display

shushing-action-figureThere are not too many places where you can see a “Shushing Librarian Action Figure,” but if you check out the display on the second floor of the Hatfield Library, you’ll see this figure along with some wonderful photos and assorted items relating to the history of Willamette’s libraries.

Libraries at Willamette have a long and interesting history.  The original library was housed on the third floor of the University Hall, later renamed Waller Hall.  When the building was rebuilt after the 1919 fire, the library was relocated to the second floor.

A new library building was built and the library moved from Waller to what is now Smullin.  One Friday in May 1938, classes were cancelled and students and staff moved the collection carrying the books in their arms to the new location. And did you know that in the ’80s, two cats lived in the old Smullin library?  When the library moved to its current location, the cats were adopted by library staff members and taken to their homes.  Any guesses as to the names of the cats?*

moving-the-libraryDo you know when Willamette got its second library? (This excludes the separate music library that was housed in the Fine Arts building).  The J.W. Long Law Library opened in 1967.  In the big flood of 1996, the Law library suffered some major damage.

Photos capture the big move as books were loaded onto carts by students and library staff, and rolled over from the Smullin library to the new Mark O. Hatfield Library in 1986.

The exhibit also includes interesting library artifacts.  You might remember or have seen some of the technology the library used to employ, such as Zip Disks.  But you probably have never seen a 7-inch electric eraser!  We even still have the metal plates that were used to help guide the eraser and avoid damaging the printed ink.  wu-libraries-display

Imagine what it would be like if we were still using card catalogs to look up books, or print indexes for journal articles.  We are very fortunate to have our digital catalogs and databases of today.

A lot has changed for our campus libraries, and they will undoubtedly continue to change to meet the needs of the Willamette Community.  Take this opportunity to view the amazing history of Willamette’s libraries!

*Snooter (a striped “tiger” cat) and Pee Wee (a tortoiseshell cat).  Pee Wee was later renamed to Kit; both cats were female and enjoyed long, happy lives.