Faculty Colloquium, Sammy Basu

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, March 17th at 3 pm. in Ford 122for our sixth Colloquium of this semester. (Please note change in location)

Sammy Basu
, Professor of Politics
 

Title: Humoring Democracy:  or Why I Read the Nazis for Laughs

Modernity is hard on us, whence reactions to it abound. However, humor can make it bearable and even pleasurable. In my research I illustrate the argument that modern liberal democracy needs its citizens to have an appropriate sense of humor using the historical record of the Weimar Republic and the Nazi Third Reich culminating with World War II and the Holocaust. I highlight Weimar-era pro-democratic defenders and their cognitive and communicative turns to liberal and leveling humor, and contrast them against Hitler, Goebbels, Rosenberg etc., and their Nazi honor-bound and hierarchic sense of humor. In effect, on this view, the democratic Republic failed because of an irony deficiency and conversely the authoritarian Reich flourished because it contrived to provide German gentiles with the ‘last laugh’. In closing, I will apply this analysis to the contemporary US political situation.

Students are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Colloquium Coordinators


Talk by Vershawn Ashanti Young

“Should Students Use They Own English?” by Vershawn Ashanti Young

Wednesday, March 15, 4:30 p.m.
Location: Hatfield Room

In this talk, Young explains and demonstrates why students must develop agency, authority, and authenticity in all of their writing, and why they must also bring style, substance, and individuality to their writing in school and professional contexts. Young is an Associate Professor in the Department of Drama and Speech Communication and the Department of English at the University of Waterloo, Canada, where he teaches African American rhetoric, performance studies, and public communication. He is author of Your Average Nigga: Performing Race, Literacy, and Masculinity and co-author of Other People’s English: Code Meshing, Code Switching, and African American Literacy.

(Source: Campus events. Image source: University of Iowa)

 


Faculty Colloquium: Cindy Koenig Richards

Dear Colleagues,

Update: This week’s Faculty Colloquium on Learning by Creating in the Public Sphere by Cindy Richards has been cancelled.

 

 

Please join us this Friday, March 10th at 3 pm. in Ford 102 for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. (Please note change in location) Treats will be provided.

Cindy Koenig Richards
, Associate Professor of Civic Communication and Media

Title: Learning by Creating in the Public Sphere

This faculty colloquium presentation will connect my scholarly work on agency to our efforts at Willamette “to transform knowledge into action and lead lives of achievement, contribution, and meaning.” My book project, Voters in the Making: Women’s Participatory Culture in the Pacific Northwest, 1865-1912, illuminates a set of practices through which disenfranchised women developed agency in the public sphere. Reflecting on this set of practices–and their relationship to liberal arts education–motivated me to make project based learning integral to my courses. I’ll share my practical approach to designing student projects that are publicly engaged, academically oriented, production centered, and peer supported. And, some students from CCM 361 The Public Sphere will join us to discuss their perspectives on two projects we carried out in fall 2016. First, students in this course led Willamette DebateWatch, a series of events that brought together more than 800 community members to view and discuss the 2016 US Presidential debates. Second, students in this course produced a self-published book of data visualizations, entitled Networked Publics in the 2016 US Presidential Campaign.

Students are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

(Text source by Doreen Simonsen)


6th Annual Edible Book Festival

THE MARK O. HATFIELD LIBRARY PRESENTS THE SIXTH ANNUAL EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL 

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, the Hatfield Library is pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by your favorite book, poem, character, or author—the only limit is your imagination.  Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible! Here are links to previous years’ entries (201620152014, 20132012).

Drop off your entries in the Hatfield Room on March 10 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible “book” between 8:00 a.m.-noon and 1:00-4:00 p.m.

At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—Michael Chasar, Monique Bourke, and Karla Gutierrez— will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Individual Student Entry
  • Best Student Group Entry
  • Most Literary
  • Most Creative
  • Punniest
  • People’s Choice

Light refreshments will be provided!

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715
cdrost@willamette.edu

 


Faculty Colloquium: Radical or Conventional Relationships

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, March 3rd at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our fifth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Huike Wen, Associate Professor of Chinese and Women and Gender Studies

Title: Radical or Conventional–Portrayal in Chinese Media of the Relationship between an Older Woman and a Younger Man

Huike Wen

The opinion that a husband should be a few years older than his wife is commonly accepted, although it is not rigid in reality and there are stories that tell otherwise in different cultures. The belief is supported by biological, sociological, economics, and psychological studies and by individuals’ reflections on experiences.

Contrary to the belief, in China, recently the romantic relationship between an older woman and a younger man has been a popular topic in the Chinese media landscape. Despite the increase in the number of such marriages and media attention on the older woman–younger man relationship, very little serious and in-depth academic work has focused on this relationship. As a myth, this type of relationship is basically represented as something new, modern, and radical, engaged in by many celebrities as well as creating media celebrities out of some ordinary people. The media portrayals seem to add another alternative in the discourse of heterosexual relationships, especially conventional heterosexual marriage. Focusing on recent popular Chinese television dramas, I examine how the media portrayals signal and celebrate a new form of relationship and marriage, yet still strongly reinforce the male-dominant status in romantic relationships.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Fred Moten Reading

Please join us for the second event in the Spring 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University, a reading by Fred Moten, acclaimed poet and scholar of African American literature and culture. The reading will take place on Wednesday, March 8, at 4:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. The event is free and open to the public.

Fred Moten, Professor of English, U of California

is the author of eight volumes of poetry, including The Feel Trio, a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of a California Book Award. His most recent collections include, The Little Edges, published by Wesleyan University Press in 2015, and The Service Porch, published by Letter Machine Editions in 2016; his scholarly books include In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition, and The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study, coauthored with Stefano Harney. He teaches at the University of California, Riverside.

In 2009, Moten was recognized as one of ten “New American Poets” by the Poetry Society of America. Poet and nonfiction author Maggie Nelson writes of his work, “With insistence, music, and a measured softness, Fred Moten’s poems construct idiosyncratic, critical canons that invite our research and repay our close attention. … It is hard to make poetry that shimmers on such an edge. Moten does so, and then some.”

Read Moten’s poem “The Salve Trade” here: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/53480

And read a recent interview here: http://lithub.com/an-interview-with-fred-moten-pt-i/

(Image source: http://english.ucr.edu/people/faculty/fred-moten)
(Text source: Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing; Department Chair of English)


Faculty Colloquium: An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, February 24th at 3 pm. in the EATON 425 for our fourth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. (Please note the change in location) Treats will be provided.

Inga Johnson, Professor of Mathematics

Title: An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory

As part of my last sabbatical, my collaborator, Allison Henrich, and I completed our book An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory (published by Dover, January 2017). Our text is unique not because of the mathematics that it contains, but rather due to the pedagogy it employs. We have designed the book to be used in an inquiry-based setting where students independently figure out, derive, and create many of the major results of knot theory while using our book as a guide. The book contains definitions, exercises, and statements of theorems, but the proofs and arguments that underlie the theory are left for readers to develop as they progress through the text. This active-learning pedagogy places the students ideas and arguments as the centerpiece of the course. As a result, class meetings include little to no lecture but are instead filled with student presentations followed by a process of questions and vetting by their peers.

In my talk I will discuss the following questions: what is the difference between math research and writing a mathematical book? How does an inquiry-based course compare to a “traditional” mathematics course? What goes into planning and managing an inquiry-based course, and how does one create inquiry-based activities? What is knot theory, and why is it a good topic for inquiry-based pedagogy? I will also discuss current research on student outcomes when inquiry-based methods are used and how those outcomes compare to non-inquiry-based courses.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Prosody and Time in Musical Settings of Emily Dickinson

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, February 10th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Marva Duerksen, Associate Professor of Music, Women’s & Gender Studies

Title: Prosody and Time in Musical Settings of Emily Dickinson

Musical settings of Emily Dickinson’s poems—some 3,000 by one collector’s reckoning—comprise a core component of the American art-song repertory and a sustained and wide-ranging constituent of her reception. That said, a mutually insightful conversation between musical and literary scholarly communities lies largely untapped, most especially in that facet of Dickinson’s poems that she herself highlights conspicuously and that constitutes a shared concern in both poetry and music: prosody, and its companion, time.

Several questions arise: how can literary prosodic method inform analysis of musical settings of her works? And, what insights can composers offer the literary community as they interpret the poet’s rhythmic and metric designs? More specifically, how do composers execute in music signal elements of Dickinson’s prosody—the familiar “dash,” a startling approach to rhyme, disruptions of conventional grammar, and idiosyncratic lineation? Then, how do composers’ renderings of such features through specially tempered rhythmic pacing, multi-layered rhythmic designs, and heterogeneous musical vocabularies in turn impact our comprehension of the disruptions endemic to her work? Finally, how can these analyses inform the categories of time—diachronic and synchronic—vital to Dickinson’s poetic project? Exploring these questions through literary models and musical settings by composers Ernst Bacon, Vincent Persichetti, and Niccoló Castiglioni provides a starting point for the dialogue proposed here.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Louis Bunce: Dialogue with Modernism Exhibit

January 21 – March 26, 2017

Melvin Henderson-Rubio Gallery

The Mark O. Hatfield Library will exhibit a few Modernism art works created by Portland artist Louis Bunce through March 26th, 2017.  Also included in this exhibit are a collection of books from our stacks on the topic of Modernism in the arts, all of which are available to check out.

(From the Hallie Ford Museum of Art’s blog post…)

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art is pleased to present a major retrospective exhibition for Louis Bunce (1907-1983), a legendary Portland painter, printmaker, and teacher who taught at the Museum Art School from 1946 to 1972 and who influenced several generations of Oregon artists. Organized by Professor Emeritus of Art History and Senior Faculty Curator Roger Hull, the exhibition will chronicle the artist’s career over a 57 year period and features 49 paintings drawn from public and private collections throughout the United States.

Hull says, “Bunce was Oregon’s archetypal modern artist of the mid-twentieth century. ‘Louie,’ as he was called, was ambitious, gregarious, fun-loving, women-loving, antic and outrageous. He was deadly serious when it came to art-making and engaged with it all: Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Post-Modernism, and at the end of his life almost operatic Romanticism.”

Born in Wyoming, Bunce moved with his family to Oregon in his youth, studied at the Museum Art School for a year, and moved to New York in the late 1920s to study at the Art Students League. At the League, he met Jackson Pollock, another Wyoming native, and they established an on-going friendship that lasted until Pollock’s death. In fact, it was Bunce who introduced Pollock to artist Lee Krasner, who would eventually become Pollock’s wife. Although Bunce returned to Portland, Oregon, he maintained strong ties with many other notable artists of the New York School throughout his career.

As a painter and printmaker, Bunce was a rising star in American art of the 1940s and 1950s. In painting, his WPA work from the 1930s gave way to inventive Surrealist forms in the 1940s, to nature-based abstract expressionist work in the 1950s and 1960s. He and his work were featured in a full-color article in Life magazine in 1957, and he was represented in New York by the John Heller Gallery and the Doris Meltzer Gallery. In the 1970s, he experimented with hard-edge geometric compositions and Pop-related imagery while his last works feature light-saturated seascapes.


Faculty Colloquium: Richard Francaviglia

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this week, Friday, February 3rd at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Richard Francaviglia
, Professor Emeritus
Title: Imagining the Atacama Desert 

Through the analysis of maps and written narratives I will demonstrate how the Atacama Desert of South America was discovered, and then re-discovered, over nearly five centuries in a series of sequential phases. From about 1530 to 1700, “Atacama” designated a remote but strategic political province whose lack of population rather than desert climate was emphasized. After about 1700, however, the Atacama began to be identified as an arid region as a result of increasingly scientific mapping and exploration. In this transitional phase, the Atacama was part of a broader pattern in which the political mapping of empires was gradually supplemented by thematic physical or scientific mapmaking. In the third stage, which began in the mid-1830s, the Atacama Desert became linked to increasingly strong nationalist impulses and the rapidly growing power of international corporate developments in transportation and mineral extraction. In the fourth and current stage, which began about 1945, the Atacama began to be promoted and marketed as the quintessential desert worth experiencing for its uniqueness — something early explorers would have found incomprehensible. Past, present, and future, the Atacama reveals much about how places are discovered, and then re-discovered, through time.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators