Hallie Ford Literary Series: Sister Outsider, April 19

Please join us for the final event in the Spring 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, an evening with acclaimed performance poetry duo Sister Outsider, on Tuesday, April 19. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Cat Cavern, on the second floor the University Center, and is free and open to the public.

Sister Outsider is the award-winning duo of Dominique Christina & Denice Frohman. Both Women of the World Poetry Slam Champions, the pair travel extensively to introduce students to the wider function of language and art as activism. Inspired by the life and work of Audre Lorde, they write and perform their “otherness” into the center and use spoken word as a tool for social change.

Dominique Christina is a writer, performer, educator, and activist. She holds five national titles in the three years she has been competing in slam, including the 2014 & 2012 Women of the World Slam Champion and 2011 National Poetry Slam Champion. She is the only person to have won two Women of the World Poetry Championships. She has published two poetry collections, The Bones, The Breaking, The Balm and They Are All Me.

Denice Frohman is an award-winning poet, lyricist, and educator. She is the 2013 Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion, 2014 Canto Mundo Fellow, 2012 Leeway Transformation Award recipient, and 2013 Hispanic Choice Award winner. Her work has appeared in the Huffington Post and the forthcoming book, Jotas: An Anthology of Queer Latina Voices. Her debut spoken word album, Feels Like Home was released in 2013.

Get a taste of Sister Outsider performing here: http://www.sisteroutsiderpoetry.com/poems

This event is sponsored by the Department of English, Students for Feminism, and the Hallie Ford Chair in Writing.

Scott Nadelson
English Department, Willamette University


2016 Edible Book Festival Results

5th Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our fifth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on April 1st 2016, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners who each won a nifty mug:  Joni Roberts, Carol Drost, KayLyn Stirton and Yasmine Robles, Leslie Whitaker, and Dillon Peck.  The exhibits were all deliciously inspired!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event. Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 20152014, 2013, and 2012. For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
09-frosting
“Frosting the Doughman”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
“Frosty the Snowman”
Punniest
06-mandarines “The Mandarins

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
Simone de Beauvoir’s
“The Mandarins”
Most Literary
16-war “War(heads)
and Peas”

Created by
Kaylyn Stirton &
Yasmine Robles
Inspired by
Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Best Student Entry
03-boys The Boys in
the Boat

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Daniel Brown’s
“The Boys in the Boat”
Most Creative
02-marzipan
“The Mars-ipan”

Created by
Dillon Peck
Inspired by
Andy Weir’s
“The Martian”
People’s Choice

 

Other Entries ……………………………..
01-salt “The Salt in Our Stars”

Created by
Audrey Nieswandt
Inspired by
John Green’s
“The Fault in Our Stars”
04-remains “The Remains of the
Day(Night Donuts)”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Kazuo Ishiguro
“The Remains of the Day”
05-three-musketeers “Western Canon”

Created by
Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by
Alexandre Dumas’
“Western Literature:
Three Musketeers”
07-two-cities “It was the Best of Times,
It was the Wurst of Times”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Charles Dicken’s
“A Tale of Two Cities”
08-dirt
“The Good Earth”

Created by
Paul Meuse
Inspired by
Pearl S. Buck’s
“The Good Earth”
10-none
“And Then There
Were None”

Created by
Allison Johnson
Inspired by
Agatha Christie’s
“And Then There Were None”
11-water
“Like Water for Chocolate”

Created by
Allison Johnson
Inspired by
Laura Esquivel’s
“Like Water for Chocolate”
12-gas
“Gone with the Wind: Remembrance of
Things Passed”

Created by
Al Furtwangler
Inspired by
Margaret Mitchell’s
“Remembrance of Things Past
and Gone with the Wind”
13-waldo “Pears Waldo”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
Martin Handford’s
“Where’s Waldo”
14-fish “A String in the Carp”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Nancy Bond’s
“A String in the Harp”
15-bread “Bride and Bread Juices”

Created by
Doreen Simonsen
Inspired by
Jane Austen’s
“Pride and Prejudice”
17-bottles “The Naked Lunch”

Created by
Jason Yelle
Inspired by
William S. Burroughs’
“The Naked Lunch”
18-walk “The Ones Who Walk
Away from the Omelets”

Created by
Bistro
Inspired by
Ursula K. Le Guin’s
“The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”

Faculty Colloquium: The Alexander Technique

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 8th at 3 pm. in the Room 145 of Fine Arts West (Use West Entrance that faces Goudy Hall) for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.Anita King

Anita King, Professor of Music Emerita, Piano

Title: The Alexander Technique: How Our Daily Activities Can Make Us Freer!

Abstract: The Alexander Technique is a simple and practical method for improving ease and freedom of movement, balance, support, and improved coordination. Practice of the Technique refines and heightens kinesthetic sensitivity, offering people a fluid and lively control of their movement. It provides a means whereby the use of a part–a voice or an arm or a leg–is improved by improving the use of the whole body, indeed, the whole self. These benefits are accomplished through a process of self-observation where one becomes intimately aware of one’s movement habits so that one can suspend habitual, often unconscious, muscular tightening where it exists and gradually, consciously, replace it with constructive behavior.

I will lead participants in explorations and activities designed to shed light on several topics related to coordinate movement (and yes, sitting, standing and speaking are movement activities!). These include: becoming more fully embodied by waking up the tactile and kinesthetic senses; sitting and standing with ease by taking full advantage of the weight-bearing capacity of the bony structure; maintaining full-stature by eliminating the distorting effects of unnecessary muscular effort (tension); avoiding isolation and overworking of individual parts by keeping them in continuous relation to the whole body.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Liquid Sky, Faculty Colloquium by Chuck Williamson

williamsonsm

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 1st at 3 pm. in the Kremer Board Room (FORD 102) for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Chuck Williamson, Professor of Chemistry
 

Title: Liquid Sky: Liquid-Liquid Mixtures, Light Scattering, and Critical Behavior

Abstract:  The romance of a bottle of wine and a technicolor sunset – perhaps the perfect pairing of a liquid-liquid mixture with light scattering phenomena. This talk will strive for a second-best pairing by showing how light scattering may be used to understand the physical properties of liquid-liquid mixtures. At first glance, pouring two nonreactive liquids together to make a mixture seems like a very simple physical process. Sometimes two liquids mix completely, like ethanol and water do in alcoholic beverages. Sometimes the liquids stay in two layers and do not mix very much at all, like oil and water. However, many pairs of liquids show both types of behavior: the liquids mix completely for some temperatures and some mixing ratios, but the liquids separate into two layers at other conditions. In this talk I will discuss the laser light scattering method we use to make maps of the exact conditions in which two liquids mix to form a single layer, or phase. I will introduce special points on the maps called critical points, and show the universal and beautiful physical behavior that all liquid-liquid mixtures exhibit at a critical point, like critical opalescence and spinodal decomposition. I will also present a new type of fundamental liquid-liquid phase behavior my students and I have observed here at Willamette. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the complex ways in which light can scatter from a liquid-liquid mixture by incorporating examples of light scattering found in the atmosphere, such as the whiteness of clouds and fog, the blueness of the sky, and solar halos. There is also a brief shout out to Edvard Munch.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Lausanne Hall Through the Years

Many students have lived in Lausanne Hall throughout the years, and in celebration of this landmark campus building we have a display with numerous photos and historical descriptions.  Below are some of the photos and description plates about Lausanne Hall which will be on display until May 15th.

l2Throughout Lausanne Hall’s History, she has had many names Woman’s College, Women’s College, Lausanne Hall, and the U.S.S. Lausanne.  And the name Lausanne has been used for three different buildings.

There are some fun quotes highlighting life in Lausanne Hall, such as from the Willamette Collegian, November 11, 1909: “No more fear from fire at the Hall now.  We have a new chemical fire extinguisher and a chain-ladder fire escape. ”  Then a week later in the Collegian, “Lausanne Hall was saved from destruction by fire last Saturday by gallant efforts of Messrs. Oakes, Anderson and Booth.  As is the case with boys, they visited the kitchen afterwards.”

l3

In 1918, the old Lausanne Hall was condemned, and a song was made about its languishing condition: “There’s an old historic building, Fames in story and in song. Where the Westland’s fairest daughters Linger: may they linger long.  Old Lausanne may not look splendid, Its appearance don’t deride, it is some majestic ruin, When you view it from the inside.  (Second Chorus) Through insurance underwriters Think its fire risk is too great To Protect it by insurance. Yet it’s here we want to state Thought they call it an “Old Firetrap…”

In October of 1919, the old Lausanne Hall was razed by the Willamette “boys” and finished by professional workmen.  The old Music Building at Willamette was remodeled and temporarily used for housing for the young women at Willamette while the new home was being built.

l4

As World War II rolled around, in December of 1942 the Board of Trustees approved a plan to offer Lausanne Hall as a men’s dormitory in the event Willamette was selected as a site for a Navy or Army training unit for World War II.  In April, 1943, Willamette was selected as a site to offer the V-12 naval program and plans are made to house 150 men in Lausanne, and a few months later in July 270 men reported to Willamette University’s naval headquarters (Gatke Hall). In October 1945, the V-12 Navy program comes to an end.

L1


Edible Book Festival, April 1st

Do you like food? Books? How about edible books? The library is hosting its fifth annual Edible Book Festival in the Hatfield Room on April 1st, and you are invited to participate!

“War and Peas” by Alice French

“War and Peas” by Alice French

An edible book is a dish inspired by any book, whether your inspiration be the title, the characters in it, plot points, or really anything. The only limits on your creation are that it must be made of mostly food and must be inspired by a book of some kind. We’ll have an example on display in the library soon, or you can check here for examples and inspiration to get your creativity flowing!

If you find yourself with a brilliant idea, bring your edible book to the Hatfield Room between 8:00am and 1:00pm on April 1st. We are excited to see more of your wonderful creations this year!

Drop off entries by 1pm in the Hatfield Room.

8-1pm and 2-4:30pm – Public voting & viewing times

1-2pm – Judging panel votes

4:30pm – Awards ceremony & light refreshments

Prizes will be awarded for the People’s Choice, the Most Literary, the Most Creative, the Punniest, and the Best Student Entry.

Please contact Carol Drost for any questions at cdrost@willamette.edu (503-370-6715).  The following link opens a PDF poster which contains all of the details of the upcoming event: ediblebooks-poster.pdf

edible-book-festival-2016-lg


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Successful Strategies by Andrea Stolowitz

Please join us for a special event in the Spring 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, in collaboration with the Department of Theatre: a staged reading of Successful Strategies, a new play by Andrea Stolowitz, twice winner of the Oregon Book Award for drama.

Produced by Theatre 33 and directed by Elisabeth Rothan, the reading will take place on Tuesday, March 15, at 7 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. It is free and open to the public and will be followed by a Q&A with the author.

Successful Strategies is a comedy inspired by the Marivaux play of the same name. The original play deals with the handlings, schemes, and strategies around trying to make love stay in 1733 Burgundy, France, the ancestral home of the Pinot Noir grape. Andrea’s play examines the same questions, but it takes place now, in Oregon, the North American home of Pinot Noir. It’s play about love, grape growing, and wine making in all of their individual and exquisite pains.

Andrea Stolowitz has been Willamette’s resident playwright since 2008, teaching classes in the Departments of English and Theatre. Her plays have been presented and developed at The Cherry Lane (NYC), The Old Globe (SD), The Long Wharf (CT), New York Stage and Film (NY), and Portland Center Stage (OR). The LA Times calls her work “heartbreaking” and the Orange County Register characterizes her approach as a “brave refusal to sugarcoat…issues and tough decisions.” A recipient of Artists Repertory Theater’s $25,000 New Play Commission, Andrea’s latest work Ithaka premiered at the theater in 2013 to critical acclaim. It had its mid-west premiere in 2014 in Chicago’s InFusion Theater. Her play Antarktikos world-premiered at The Pittsburgh Playhouse in March 2013 and was workshopped nationwide at The New Harmony Project (IN), Portland Center Stage’s JAW Festival, and at Seattle Repertory Theater. She also teaches playwriting and screenwriting at the University of Portland.

Listen to Andrea discussing Ithaka on OPB’s Think Out Loud here: http://www.opb.org/thinkoutloud/segment/ithaka-examines-life-returning-veterans/.

Scott Nadelson


Faculty Colloquium: Bacteria Get Sick, Too

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, March 11th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Melissa Marks, Assistant Professor of BiologyMelissa Marks

Title: Bacteria Get Sick, Too: The Influence of Cell Surface Structure on Bacterial Avoidance of Viral Infection

Abstract:

All living things encounter challenges that can affect their survival and persistence in the environment. For bacteria, a significant source of this stress comes in the form of lethal bacteriophage (viral) infection. Because bacteriophage in the environment greatly outnumber bacteria, these infections present a significant threat to survival for bacterial cells and populations. In the freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, production of complex external polysaccharides (EPS) obscures the physical phage binding sites and prevents phage attachment and infection. In this talk I will discuss the approaches my students and I used to identify several genes required for biosynthesis of the EPS and to measure how the presence of EPS allows cells to evade phage attack.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

PS: Our next presentation will be on Friday, April 1st


Diary of Janette McCalley Stowell

JanetteStowell-Mrs.GeoJanette McCalley was born in Kirkcaldy, Scotland on January 29, 1847. She came to America with her parents in 1851 and the family moved to Salem, Oregon in 1859. Janette McCalley graduated from Willamette University with a B.S. in 1865 and taught for a time in the Preparatory Course at Willamette University. She married George Stowell on February 20, 1870 in Springfield, Oregon. She and George had four children.

By 1888, the Stowell family had moved to Corbett Street in Portland, Oregon. In January, 1890, Janette Stowell began a diary which she kept, in an irregular fashion, until 1906. She died on February 4, 1916, and was survived by her husband, and three of her four children.

Collection Description

Janette McCalley Stowell’s journal retains original order.  It can be viewed at:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:manuscripts/2744/cpd/0/75/0

Janette Stowell was a graduate of Willamette University and a member of the teaching staff at that university before her marriage. Her diary details her family’s life at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth in Portland, Oregon and Sitka, Alaska. She writes of keeping a garden and growing flowers, caring for her children, entertaining friends, going to church and her involvement in a branch of the Chautauqua Institute.

In February of 1890 the Portland area experienced a damaging flood which covered Ross Island and washed away many buildings and homes. Mrs. Stowell describes walking to where the family could see the flood waters covering Ross Island and watching debris pile up at the Ross Island Bridge.

In the late 1890s she joined a reading club and was more involved in growing roses. By 1900, after a break in the diary of two years, she reports the family is in Sitka, Alaska where her husband is working. The final entry in the diary is for August 25, 1906.


Faculty Colloquium by Cecily McCaffrey

cecily-mccaffreyDear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, March 4th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our fifth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Cecily McCaffrey, Associate Professor of History
 

Title: Wang Sanhuai and the Jiaqing Emperor: A Study in Political Dialogue

Abstract:
Wang Sanhuai was a prominent rebel leader of the White Lotus Uprisings (1796-1804) in Sichuan province, China. Wang and his band resisted state authority and evaded arrest for two years. During that time, Wang and his fellows made a mockery of imperial policies of pacification that rewarded loyal subjects: for example, in an episode recounted in the Qing shi gao, Wang petitioned for surrender as a ploy to facilitate an ambush against Qing military forces. However, when he was finally captured, Wang played the role of penitent, claiming that he had wished to surrender all along. This talk examines Wang’s depositions and official reports of his conduct as evidence of non-elite political maneuvering. When read against the grain of court rhetoric, Wang’s testimony and actions suggest not only that he had a perspicacious command of imperial policy but also that he attempted to engage officers of the court on their own terms as he negotiated for his life. Although Wang did not survive, his arguments were not without effect: references to Wang’s testimony surface in the Jiaqing emperor’s edicts discussing the evolution of state pacification policies in the months following Wang’s arrest. Taking Wang Sanhuai as one example, this talk argues for increased recognition of the role and influence of non-elite subjects in the constitution and evolution of the state-society relationship in Qing China.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators