Library News

Featured Database: GeoRef

georefGeoRef is a geoscience database that provides access to over 2,000,000 records for the world’s geological sciences literature, including journal articles, books, maps, conference papers, and theses.

Produced by the American Geosciences Institute, this comprehensive geosciences database contains 3.4 million bibliographic records to the geosciences literature of the world. Over 3,500 journals are reviewed for indexing in the GeoRef database as well as books, maps, government reports, conference papers, theses and dissertations.  Over 100,000 references are added to GeoRef annually.

It is truly an indispensable research tool, and a first-stop when researching anything related to the earth sciences.  The geology of North America is covered from 1669 to the present, and global coverage dates back to 1933. In fact, the Library Journal had this to say about this resource: “[The] Advanced Search, with its elegantly laid-out tool set for crafting very precise search strategies, gives the user great control over the whole search process.”

Welcoming Ashley Toutain

WU Archives and Special Collections Welcomes Ashley Toutain!

ashleyphoto-cropped

Ashley Toutain joins the Archives’ team full-time as the Processing Archivist and Records Manager. Since September 2012, Ashley has been employed part-time as Willamette’s Assistant Records Manager. In that role, Ashley has contributed significantly by helping to process a backlog of university records that have been accumulating for decades. In addition to processing university records, Ashley curated an exhibit on Willamette’s behalf for the annual Heritage Invitational Exhibition at the Willamette Heritage Center. The exhibit highlighted the many components that comprise a successful archives program. A native of Eastern Oregon, Ashley graduated from Willamette University in 2008 with a B.A. in history. She then attended the University of Kansas where she received her M.A. in Museum Studies.

Ashley brings to the position a collaborative and innovative working-style as well as a keen appreciation for the history of Willamette University and the surrounding region. Please join us in welcoming Ashley!

Graphic Novels and Identity in Africa and the Diaspora

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 4th at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium.

Our speaker will be:

Michelle Bumatay, Visiting Assistant Professor of French

Title: Graphic Novels and Identity in Africa and the Diaspora: A Visual Postcolonial Discoursebumatay_sm

Abstract: Former French President Charles de Gaulle’s famous claim that Belgian character Tintin was his only international rival speaks to the ubiquity of bandes dessinées (comics and graphic novels) in the francophone world. Similarly, in Peau noire, Masques blancs, Frantz Fanon highlights the popularity of bandes dessinées and points to the negative psychological impact of such texts on non-European readers who identify with Western explorer characters rather than with the racialized stereotypical images of non-European characters. One major factor for this is that the emergence and development of French and Belgian bandes dessinées took place during the height of European colonialism and subsequently drew from and participated in a visual culture—such as travel postcards, brochures and keepsakes from colonial expositions, and in particular advertisements for exotic goods such as Banania—that helped construct the European imaginary of Africa. My current work examines how contemporary cartoonists employ a wide range of visual and verbal strategies to subvert existing visual stereotypes of blacks and Africa prevalent in French-language graphic novels (the most ubiquitous example being Tintin in the Congo) and visual culture (including ad campaigns for exotic goods such as Banania). Focusing on cartoonists from West and Central Africa whose work dates from the 1980s to today, my work is chiefly concerned with the representations of postcolonial identity formation. Moreover, I contend that these cartoonists, by challenging mainstream European graphic narrative conventions, invite readers to question meaning-making processes and actively generate new ways of thinking of and visualizing Africa.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

WU Author: Allison Hobgood

The English Department is delighted to invite you to celebrate the launch of Professor Hobgood’s new books, Passionate Playgoing in Early Modern England (Cambridge University Press) and Recovering Disability in Early Modern England (Ohio State University Press). hobgood Professor Hobgood will discuss the process of writing and publishing both a monograph and co-edited collection of scholarly essays. Light refreshments will be served.

Date: April 2nd
Time: 4:30-5:30pm
Hatfield Room, Hatfield Library

Sponsored by the English Department

Passionate Playgoing in Early Modern England

Allison P. Hobgood tells a new story about the emotional experiences of theatregoers in Renaissance England. Through detailed case studies of canonical plays by Shakespeare, Jonson, Kyd and Heywood, the reader will discover what it felt like to be part of performances in English theatre and appreciate the key role theatregoers played in the life of early modern drama. How were spectators moved – by delight, fear or shame, for example – and how did their own reactions in turn make an impact on stage performances? Addressing these questions and many more, this book discerns not just how theatregoers were altered by drama’s affective encounters, but how they were undeniable influences upon those encounters. Overall, Hobgood reveals a unique collaboration between the English world and stage, one that significantly reshapes the ways we watch, read and understand early modern drama.

“Allison Hobgood’s persuasive addition to the burgeoning study of affect and emotion in Renaissance culture offers a provocative new reading of some familiar plays. Her argument that early modern spectators and plays are involved in a reciprocal emotional contagion makes a powerful contribution to our changing conception of theater audiences in the period.”
-Emma Smith, University of Oxford

Recovering Disability in Early Modern England

While early modern selfhood has been explored during the last two decades via a series of historical identity studies involving class, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality, until very recently there has been little engagement with disability and disabled selves in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. This omission is especially problematic insofar as representations of disabled bodies and minds serve as some of the signature features in English Renaissance texts. Recovering Disability in Early Modern England explores how recent conversations about difference in the period have either overlooked or misidentified disability representations. It also presents early modern disability studies as a new theoretical lens that can reanimate scholarly dialogue about human variation and early modern subjectivities even as it motivates more politically invested classroom pedagogies. The ten essays in this collection range across genre, scope, and time, including examinations of real-life court dwarfs and dwarf narrators in Edmund Spenser’s poetry; disability in Aphra Behn’s assessment of gender and femininity; disability humor, Renaissance jest books, and cultural ideas about difference; madness in revenge tragedies; Spenserian allegory and impairment; the materiality of literary blindness; feigned disability in Jonsonian drama; political appropriation of Richard III in the postcommunist Czech Republic; the Book of Common Prayeras textual accommodation for cognitive disability; and Thomas Hobbes’s and John Locke’s inherently ableist conceptions of freedom and political citizenship.

National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month.  Created by the Academy of American Poets in 1996, National Poetry Month is held every April throughout the United States to celebrate poetry and its vital place in American culture. Thousands of organizations participate through readings, festivals, book displays, workshops, and other events.

For fun and inspirational ways to get involved, here’s a link to 30 ways of celebrating poetry.  For more information about National Poetry Month check out Poets.org.

Below is a sampling of recent poetry books that can be found in the Hatfield Library.  And here are some Library of Congress call number ranges if you would like to browse for poetry in our stacks:

PG3230-3238 Russian Poetry
PS301-326 American Poetry
PQ4091-4131, PQ4207-4225 Italian Poetry
PQ6075-6098, PQ6174.95-6215 Spanish Poetry
PQ9061-9081, PQ9149-9163 Portuguese Poetry
PT500-597, PT1151-1241 German Poetry
PT5201-5243, PT5470-5488 Dutch Poetry
PN1010-1525 Poetry (General)
PN1031-1049 Theory and Philosophy of Poetry
PN1110-1279 History and criticism
PN1301-1333 Epic Poetry
PN1341-1347 Folk Poetry
PN1351-1389 Lyric Poetry
PR500-614, PR1170-1228 Poetry by Period

 

Cover Art

The auroras : new poems – St. John, David

Call Number: PS3569.A4536 A95 2012

 

Cover Art

By herself – Greger, Debora

Call Number: PS3557.R42 B9 2012

 

Cover Art

The Cambridge Introduction to modernist poetry – Howarth, Peter

Call Number: PN1271 .H69 2012

 

Cover Art

Changing is not vanishing: a collection of early American Indian poetry to 1930

Call Number: PS591.I55 C47 2011

 

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The football corporations: poems – Heyen, William

Call Number: PS3558.E85 F66 2012

 

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On the spectrum of possible deaths – Perillo, Lucia Maria

Call Number: PS3566.E69146 O5 2012

 

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Poems under Saturn = Poymes saturniens – Verlaine, Paul

Call Number: PQ2463 .P5713 2011

Edible Book Festival Results, 2014

Third Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our third annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 14th, 2014, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Below are photos of the entries and the winners.

 

Award Winners
war-and-peas2 “War and Peas”

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
People’s Choice
pitcher-dory-gray “Pitcher of Dory in Gray

Created by Emily Wetherford
Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s
Portrait of Dorian Gray”
Best Student Entry
 dune He Who Controls the
Spice Controls the Universe

Created by Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by Frank Herbert’s
“Dune”
Most Creative
war-and-peas War and Peas

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Most Literary
 wholey-bible2 The Hole-y Bible

Created by Anna Corner
Inspired by “The Holy Bible”
Punniest
Other Entries
 snow “Roe Falling on Pitas”

Created by Joni Roberts
Inspired by David Guterson’s
“Snow Falling on Cedars”
clockwork-orange “A Clockwork Orange”

Created by Elaine Goff
Inspired by Anthony Burgess’
“A Clockwork Orange”
 three-pigs “Three Little Pigs”

Created by Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
“Three Little Pigs”
 butter-battle “The Butter Battle Book”

Created by Amy Amato
Inspired by Dr. Seuss’
“The Butter Battle Book”
 hotel “Hotel at the Corner of
Bitter and Sweet”

Created by Sara Amato
Inspired by Jamie Ford’s “Hotel at
the Corner of Bitter and Sweet”
 wind “Gone with the Wind”

Created by Liz Butterfield
Inspired by Margaret Mitchell’s
“Gone with the Wind”
dirty-dozen “The Dirty Dozen”

Created by Kelly Slaughter
Inspired by E. M. Nathanson’s
“The Dirty Dozen”
 pizza “The Lite in the Pizza”

Created by Carol Drost
Inspired by Elizabeth Spencer’s
“The Light in the Piazza”
mentos “All Spice and Mentos”

Created by Joni Roberts
Inspired by John Steinbeck’s
“Of Mice and Men”
 greenbean “The Loneliness of the Long
Distant Runner Bean”

Created by Peter Harmer
Inspired by Alan Sillitoe’s
“The Loneliness of the Long
Distant Runner”
Additional Photos
coddled-connie judging
fresh-frank exhibits
smelly-shelly roe
rotten-roy war-peas
raw-ramona war-peas2
pickled-paul holey-bible-cake
judging1 judging2
judging3 judging4
judging5 judging6
judging7 judging8

For  questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

 

Novelist: Adrianne Harun

Please join us for the final event in the Spring 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a reading and talk by acclaimed novelist Adrianne Harun on Thursday, April 3. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.

Adrianne is the author of A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain, released this month by Penguin Books. Inspired by the disappearance of Native girls from a stretch of highway in British Columbia, the novel weaves together folklore, mythology, and elements of magical realism to create a compelling and unsettling portrait of life in a dead-end town.Harun

The Vancouver Sun calls the book “remarkable. It reads with the level care of a finely crafted story, the sort you might find in a literary magazine, but also with the fresh familiarity of a folksong.”

A long-time resident of Port Townsend, Washington, Adrianne teaches in the Rainier Writing Workshop MFA Program at Pacific Lutheran University and the Sewanee School of Letters at the University of the South. Her first story collection, The King of Limbo, was a Sewanee Writing Series selection and a finalist for the Washington Book Award.

Listen to an interview with Adrianne here: http://otherpeoplepod.com/archives/2709

Scott Nadelson
Hallie Ford Chair in Writing

Research Award $500 Cash Prize!

Money, Money, Money…

Have you written and researched an amazing paper this year?  If so, we’ve got good news…the library is sponsoring its annual MOHL Research Award and you may be eligible to win a $500 cash prize! The award will be given for a student paper in any discipline that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources.  Last year’s award winner was then junior Miles Sari’s for his paper “‘Piece of Me’—A Framing Analysis of the Deconstruction and Reconstruction of Britney Spears.”

To be eligible for this award, the paper must have been written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work and in the current academic year (Fall 2013/Spring 2014). For complete details and instructions see:  libmedia.willamette.edu/award.

*Papers done as a senior project but in the junior year are excluded.

research-awards-2014

Faculty Colloquium: Brandi Rowe

Dear Colleagues,
Please join us this Friday, March 14th at 2:00 pm in Cone Chapel for this week’s Faculty Colloquium. (Please note the change of location.)

Our speaker will be: Brandi Row Lazzarini, Associate Professor of Exercise Science

row

Title: Walking and harmony: Studying walking smoothness of older adults using the harmonic ratio.

Abstract:  Similar to the concept of musical harmony, a person’s walking motions can be constructive, or in phase with the base frequency (consonant), or destructive and out of phase with the base frequency (dissonant).  In biomechanics, walking ‘smoothness’ is quantified as the ratio of the amplitude of constructive and destructive acceleration harmonics.  In older adults, walking smoothness breaks down into more dissonant states caused by increased ‘out of phase’ motions, and this breakdown occurs faster in individuals at a higher risk of falling. My current work explores practical aspects of the use of this sort of biomechanical variable, such as whether it is impacted by walking on a treadmill, and whether it can be represented by clinical tests of stepping, which would have implications toward improving clinical assessment of mobility function.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

National Nutrition Month

Image source: nih.gov Nutrition Month

Image source: NIH.gov Nutrition Month

March is National Nutrition Month! After the past few months of holiday meals, you may be motivated to start eating more nutritiously and exercise regularly.  A big emphasis during this month is simply to make INFORMED CHOICES about the food you eat and to develop sound eating and physical activity habits. Remember to not give up on changing your goal of living healthier.  Good habits take a long time to establish (66 days or more).

Here are a few tips taken from EATRIGHT.ORG:

  1. Explore New Foods, Flavors and ‘Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.’ If your food begins to loose its luster, adding more nutrition and pleasure to each meal is as easy as expanding the range of foods you choose. Try one new fruit, vegetable or whole grain every week. Start small by picking a different type of apple, a different color potato or a new flavor of whole-grain rice until you are comfortable picking entirely new things that you’ve never tried or heard of before.
  2. The next time you eat out, choose a restaurant that features ethnic foods from Asia, Europe or Africa. These restaurants often feature menus filled with healthy options that will be new to you.
  3. If you prepare your own meals, add a pinch of this or that to give your regular dishes some additional zing.  Remember, you have about 10,000 taste buds, so don’t be afraid to try something new.

The National Library of Medicine has some great suggestions for eating habits and behaviors:

  1. A food journal is a good tool to help you learn about your eating habits. Keep a food journal for 1 week.
    • Write down what you eat, how much, and what times of day you are eating.
    • Include notes about what else you were doing and how you were feeling, such as being hungry, stressed, tired, or bored. For example, maybe you were at work and were bored. So you got a snack from a vending machine down the hall from your desk.
    • At the end of the week, review your journal and look at your eating patterns. Decide which habits you want to change.
  2. Reflect on your food journal.  Look at your journal and circle any regular or repetitive triggers. Some of these might be:
    • You see your favorite snack in the pantry or vending machine
    • When you watch television
    • You feel stressed by something at work or in another area of your life
    • You have no plan for dinner after a long day
    • You go to work events where food is served
    • You stop at fast-food restaurants for breakfast and choose high fat, high calorie foods
    • You need a pick-me-up toward the end of your workday
  3. Replace your old habits with new ones.
    1. Find health choices for snacks and plan ahead. Take only a small portion, put it in a dish and put the rest away. Eat fruit and yogurt in the mid-afternoon about 3 or 4 hours after lunch.
    2. Eat only when you are hungry. Eating when you are feel worried, tense, or bored also leads to overeating. Instead, call a friend or go for a walk to help you feel better.
    3. Eat Slowly. Eating too quickly leads to overeating when the food you have eaten has not yet reached your stomach and told your brain you are full. You will know you are eating too quickly if you feel stuffed about 20 minutes after you stop eating.
    4. Plan your meals. Know what you will eat ahead of time so you can avoid buying unhealthy foods (impulse buying) or eating at fast-food restaurants.
    5. Get rid of unhealthy foods. Put them out of sight or in hard to reach places.  Replace your candy dish with a bowl of fruit or nuts.
  4. An old saying goes: “Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.”
    1. Breakfast sets the tone for the day. A hearty, healthy breakfast will give your body the energy it needs to get you to lunch.
    2. Plan a good lunch that will satisfy you, and a healthy afternoon snack that will keep you from becoming to hungry before dinner time.
    3. Avoid skipping meals. Missing a regular meal or snack often leads to overeating or making unhealthy choices.

     

Don’t forget that we have a huge selection of books dealing with nutrition.  A few of them are highlighted this month on our WU Reads page.