Alumni Weekend Events

We have a few events that will be held in the Hatfield Library during Alumni Weekend, Sept 22-25.  All are invited to attend and participate, and we hope to see you there! The link to the full schedule is:
http://willamette.edu/alumni/activities/alumni_weekend/schedule/index.html

FRIDAY, Sept 23rd

HATFIELD LIBRARY TOUR

9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
Join alumni for a tour of the Hatfield Library and a special presentation from University Archives. Stick around after the tour for the session, “Willamette’s Political Papers Collection.”
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Circulation Desk (1st Floor)

 

WILLAMETTE’S POLITICAL PAPERS COLLECTION
10:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Willamette University has a long tradition of educating politically and civically engaged leaders. But did you know WU’s Archives and Special Collections has a significant Political Archive documenting some of the most important regional and national legislation of the late 20th century? Join the Politics Department and Archives Department for a conversation centering on significant environmental legislation with former U.S. congressional leaders including Mike Kopetski and Bob Packwood ’54 (whose congressional papers are housed in WU’s archives) and learn why these collections are invaluable in helping us tell our collective story.
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

 

THE EVOLUTION OF WILLAMETTE’S ARCHITECTURAL AND NATURAL LANDSCAPE
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
Curious to know how Willamette’s campus evolved from a single building in a field to the beautiful setting we appreciate today? Come hear public historian Dr. William F. Willingham ’66 as he shares information that he has accumulated while researching Willamette’s architectural and natural landscape for his forthcoming book on the subject.
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

FRIDAY, Sept 23rd

THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF ELECTIONS AMERICAN STYLE
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Join Professor Melissa Michaux, Politics, for this discussion: Elections are supposed to be the vehicle to transcribe voter preferences into action, set an agenda for a governing majority and reassure Americans that we live in a democracy where the will of the people are expressed. Many features of modern American elections make these goals difficult. What should voters expect from American elections? What are they likely to get?
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

 


Newly-Emerging Technologies and the Future of Humanity

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us tomorrow, Friday, September 9th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our first Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Govindan Parayil, Mark and Melody Teppola Presidential Distinguished Visiting Professor

Title: Newly-Emerging Technologies and the Future of HumanityGovindan Parayil

Abstract: Recent advances in biological, computer and material sciences have made many thinkers to revisit the age-old warnings about the dangers of run-way technological change. This, in addition to the threat to all life on earth due to run away climate change, adds to the doomsday scenario. Computer pioneer Bill Joy’s famous article, “Why the Future Doesn’t Need Us” in WIRED magazine is getting renewed attention with a slew of books and articles about the threat to humanity’ future (see for example books by Nick Bostrom, Yuval Harari and others) due to advances in biotechnology and artificial intelligence. In this lecture I will go over these issues and see if humanity’s future is, indeed, doomed as claimed. I will argue that, yes, we must be concerned, but the “post-human” tomorrow waiting for us should be least of our worries when we should be worried about global poverty, increasing inequality, civil wars, and environmental problems.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Brings Plenty Opens 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series

Poet, musician, and filmmaker Trevino L. Brings Plenty will open the 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series on Thursday, September 15 at 7:30 p.m. He is the author of two full-length volumes of poetry, Wakpá Wanáği, Ghost River and Real Indian Junk Jewelry. Trevino Brings PlentyHis work has also been included in the collection Shedding Skins: Four Sioux Poets. A Lakota Indian born on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in South Dakota, Trevino explores in a variety of media American Indian identity and urban Indian life. He is a singer/songwriter and guitarist with the ensemble Ballads of Larry Drake, and he has read and performed his poetry from Portland, Oregon, to Amman, Jordan. About Trevino’s most recent book, the poet and novelist Sherman Alexie writes, “These poems are ‘porcupine quills,’ beautiful and sharp. They draw blood. They make me laugh and cry. I love this book.”

The event is free and open to the public. Books will be for sale, courtesy of the Willamette Store.

For more information, contact:
Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Willamette University
snadelso@willamette.edu
503-370-6290


Fall Semester Hours

We will continue our shortened building hours throughout the week of August 22nd (8 am – 5 pm).  On Saturday we will be open 10-4pm, but closed all day Sunday.  Monday, August 29, the first day of class, our hours will extend to 8 am – Midnight.

Our full semester hours will begin Monday, August 5th (7:45 am – 2 am) weekdays, Saturdays (10 am – 9 pm), and Sundays (10 am – 2 am).

Details at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar/

 

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(Image source: Pixabay.com)


Welcome (Back)

Welcome to the Mark O. Hatfield Library, for those who are new to our library.  And welcome back for those who are returning!  We are ready for your return, and hope you’re ready to come back.  As you probably already know, we have top notch librarians to help with your upcoming research, plus excellent tools and resources.

Here is a link to get to a page that will help orient you to our library, or refresh your knowledge.  (And for the record, several Pokemon have been found in and around the library!)


Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

During finals week, the Hatfield Library is open extra hours to help students studying for finals exams. Don’t forget the printer in the 24-hour Fish Bowl.  A reference librarian is available for research help until 5 p.m., and we will begin putting out cookies and coffee the first night before Finals until they run out after 10 p.m. if you need a brain food break!

Here are the hours:

  • Thurs, May 5: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Fri, May 6: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sat, May 7: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sun, May 8: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 9: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 10: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 11: 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Thur, May 12: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri, May 13:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat, May 14:  Noon – 4 p.m.
  • Sun, May 15:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Mon, May 16:  Summer Schedule begins: Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  CLOSED Saturday, Sunday and holidays.

Faculty Colloquium: What I Learned in Prison

Dear Colleagues, buissm
Please join us this Friday, April 29th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our eleventh and final Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Melissa Buis Michaux, Associate Professor of Politics

Title: What I Learned in Prison

Abstract:  The United States currently incarcerates about 2.4 million men, women and children.  The number of incarcerated does not take into account how many people’s lives are touched by our extensive system of punishment, including those on parole or probation; children of incarcerated parents; and communities that support prison systems.  Furthermore, racial disparities in arrests, sentencing, and prison time call into question our guarantees of equal justice and fundamental fairness.  Inside the prison walls, many prisoners are subject to a system of control that prioritizes punishment over rehabilitation.  All of this I knew before I stepped inside a prison.  Come hear what I learned—about prison, the people behind the walls, and myself—once I went inside.  I will also be joined by some students from my “Reforming Criminal Justice” class that has been going inside the Oregon State Penitentiary this semester and working alongside prisoners.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.
Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Injuring Yourself to Better Health: How Exercise Improves Cardiovascular

lockardsmDear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 22nd at 3 pm. in Collins 205 for our tenth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Michael Lockard, Associate Professor of Exercise Science

Title: Injuring Yourself to Better Health: How Exercise Improves Cardiovascular Health

Abstract:  Regular aerobic activity has long been associated with improved cardiovascular health and decreased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease.  While aerobic exercise training has been repeatedly associated with improvements in risk factors associated with CVD, it appears that training results in an additional reduction in risk independent of the more conventional risk factor.  It has been suggested that a causal link between regular physical activity and reduced CVD risk is mediated through the improvement of endothelial health and associated vascular function.  To this date, however, a specific mechanism for linking the repeated act of exercising and improvement in vascular function has not been established.  It is the goal of this research to elucidate the details of this mechanism.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: La Maldad de Martin Wong: Approximating Nuyorico

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 15th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.Roy Perez

Roy Perez, Assistant Professor of English and American Ethnic Studies

Title: La Maldad de Martin Wong: Approximating Nuyorico

Abstract: Nicknamed “Chino Malo,” gay Chinese-American painter and art collector Martin Wong lived in Manhattan’s Lower East Side in the 1980s, where he circulated among and collaborated with a number of Puerto Rican artists and writers. In this talk, I explore how Wong’s proximity to Nuyorican (Puerto Rican New York) culture appears in and shapes his paintings. I also examine Martin Wong’s presence as a queer Asian American painter in the popular history of Latina/o arts and culture. Often depicting men of color in erotic positions and encounters, Wong’s paintings lurk on the margin of accepted Latino art history, challenging typical representations of Latino masculinity. What happens when we move Wong to the center of Latino art and cultural history? What does Wong’s vision of Nuyorico reveal to us about its people, landscape, and culture? I contend that Wong’s visual poetics enact a series of queer advances that unsettle Nuyorico’s “good” center. Mal movement or comportment—to defer fear of committing maldades and willfully do things badly, wrongly, or approximately—loosens racial identity practices from their toil toward completion and full knowing.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Sister Outsider, April 19

Please join us for the final event in the Spring 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, an evening with acclaimed performance poetry duo Sister Outsider, on Tuesday, April 19. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Cat Cavern, on the second floor the University Center, and is free and open to the public.

Sister Outsider is the award-winning duo of Dominique Christina & Denice Frohman. Both Women of the World Poetry Slam Champions, the pair travel extensively to introduce students to the wider function of language and art as activism. Inspired by the life and work of Audre Lorde, they write and perform their “otherness” into the center and use spoken word as a tool for social change.

Dominique Christina is a writer, performer, educator, and activist. She holds five national titles in the three years she has been competing in slam, including the 2014 & 2012 Women of the World Slam Champion and 2011 National Poetry Slam Champion. She is the only person to have won two Women of the World Poetry Championships. She has published two poetry collections, The Bones, The Breaking, The Balm and They Are All Me.

Denice Frohman is an award-winning poet, lyricist, and educator. She is the 2013 Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion, 2014 Canto Mundo Fellow, 2012 Leeway Transformation Award recipient, and 2013 Hispanic Choice Award winner. Her work has appeared in the Huffington Post and the forthcoming book, Jotas: An Anthology of Queer Latina Voices. Her debut spoken word album, Feels Like Home was released in 2013.

Get a taste of Sister Outsider performing here: http://www.sisteroutsiderpoetry.com/poems

This event is sponsored by the Department of English, Students for Feminism, and the Hallie Ford Chair in Writing.

Scott Nadelson
English Department, Willamette University