Alternatives to Capitalism Talk

Growing inequality, political stalemate, and climate disruption prompt an important insight. When the old ways no longer produce the outcomes we are looking for, something deeper is occurring. It is time to explore genuine alternatives and new models.

Robin Hahnel, Professor Emeritus of Economics at the American University in Washington, D.C. will talk about “The Next System.”  He currently is Co-Director of Economics for Equity and the Environment.

Robin will give the talk on Monday, November 23, in the Hatfield Room, 4:15—5:30pm.  This event is sponsored by the Peter C. and Bonnie S. Kremer Endowed Chair and the Department of Economics.


Tree of Giving Book Drive

The annual Tree of Giving Book Drive has officially begun.

The Hatfield Library, The Willamette Store and the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee are seeking donations of new or slightly used children’s books to be donated to Highland Elementary School‘s library. We are also looking for hats, gloves and scarves.

The Willamette Store is offering a 25% discount for items purchased for the Book Drive

The last day to donate is Friday, December 18. Items can be dropped off at The Willamette Store, Hatfield Library or Sparks Athletic Center.


Faculty Colloquium: Transformational Resilience Workshop


Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, October 2nd at a special time, 2:00 to 5:00 in the Hatfield Room for our fourth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Sue Koger, Professor of Psychology and
Bob Doppelt, Executive Director of The Resource Innovation Group

Title: Transformational Resilience Workshop


Climate change is often thought of as an environmental problem. This is a profound misunderstanding. Climate change is a profound threat to the mental and physical health and psycho-social-spiritual wellbeing of humanity.
This interactive workshop will begin by explaining how a warming planet will adversely affect the mental and physical health of individuals as well as the psycho-social-spiritual wellbeing of organizations, communities, and entire societies. The majority of the workshop will describe the principles and skills of the Resilient Growth model developed by a team of trauma treatment and resilience building specialists that can be used to help individuals and groups cope with and use climate-enhanced adversities to learn, grow and thrive rather than harm themselves or others. Participants will learn and practice a few of the simple skills involved with the model.

They will leave with a clear sense of the threats to individual and psychosocial wellbeing that lie ahead. They will also understand the core elements of a preventative psycho-social-spiritual resilience building model that can help themselves and others learn how to cope with climate-enhanced and other types of traumas and stresses in ways that actually increase personal and collective wellbeing and the condition of the natural environment.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Ann Copeland Papers

We’re highlighting the Virginia Furtwangler aka Ann Copeland papers from the Archives and Special Collections.

Virginia (Walsh) Furtwangler (1932-) is an American-Canadian author, writing under the name Ann Copeland. She was born and raised in Hartford, Connecticut. She attended the Catholic University of American and received her Ph.D. in Modern Literature from Cornell University. Furtwangler spent 13 years as an Ursuline nun, teaching English literature in both high school and college. Her experience as a nun provided inspiration for many of her short stories including the collection in The Golden Thread.

More at:!doc:page:eads/4799


Faculty Colloquium: Doing Disability Studies

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, September 25th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Allison Hobgood, Associate Professor of English

Title: Doing Disability Studies: Equity and Justice Through the Arts and Humanities

“Doing Disability Studies: Equity and Justice Through the Arts and Humanities” invites listeners to consider the role of disability studies in higher education and as an academic pursuit that supports social justice. Specifically, Allison P. Hobgood will explore the power of disability studies in the Humanities, discuss its history and current iterations, and offer some examples of how disability studies helps make our world a more just, inclusive, and equitable place.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Faculty Colloquium: “Sympathy for the Many”

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 3rd at 2:00 pm in the Library Instruction Room of the Hatfield Library for the sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided to accompany this talk. (Please note the change of time and location).

Stephanie DeGooyer, Assistant Professor of English degooyer

“Sympathy for the Many: Can the Novel Represent the Multitude?”

Abstract: Historians of the novel argue that many different readers in the eighteenth century were able to imagine the interior lives of singular protagonists such as Clarissa or Pamela. In this talk I consider if the reverse is possible: can the fictional imagination of one singular person comprehend the enslavement of millions of people? Can one author, one novel, or one protagonist, represent and comprehend the suffering of a multitude or species? Focusing for the most part on eighteenth-century novelist Laurence Sterne and his relationships to freed slave Ignatius Sancho and moral sense philosopher Adam Smith, this talk argues that there is a basic conflict between social and political demands for equality and fictionalized representations of suffering – and that this conflict cannot be simply dismissed as narcissism. Instead, I suggest that the novel is a limited form for the representation of the multitude, and it is from this space of limitation that it must uniquely address the world.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinator

NB: Bobby Brewer-Wallin had to cancel his previously advertised presention on “My Case Is Altered or Bodies of Elizabeth: Code-switching in Solo Performance.” Luckily we were able to get Stephanie DeGooyer to speak instead.

Winter Break Hours

The Hatfield Library has special hours during the Winter Break.
Wed, Dec. 24 – Fri, Jan. 2    CLOSED
Sat – Sun, Jan. 3 – 4     CLOSED
Mon – Fri, Jan. 5 – 9     8 – 5 p.m.
Sat – Sun, Jan. 10 – 11     CLOSED
Mon – Fri, Jan. 12 – 16     8 – 5 p.m.
Sat – Sun, Jan. 17 – 18     CLOSED

Normal building hours resume Monday, January 19th.  The Hatfield Library staff wish the Willamette Community a most wonderful and safe Winter Break and a great start to the new year!

Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

Beginning on Monday, Dec. 1, the Hatfield Library will be open extended hours for final exams. Also, don’t forget about the free cookies and coffee provided by the library…usually the cookies are made available after 10 p.m. starting on Sunday, Dec. 7th until they run out.

These are the hours for the end of the term:

Monday, Dec. 1 – Thursday, Dec. 4 — 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 5 — 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 6 — 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 7 — 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 8 – Friday, Dec. 12 — 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 13 — 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 14 — CLOSED

Winter break begins on Monday, Dec. 15. During the break, the library will be open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on the weekends. Also, the library (and the rest of campus) will be closed from Dec. 24 through Jan. 2. Regular hours resume on Jan. 19.

Thanksgiving Break Hours

The Hatfield Library has special hours during Thanksgiving.

Wed, Nov. 26     7:45 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Thur – Sat, Nov. 27 – 29     CLOSED
Sun, Nov. 30   1 p.m. – 2 a.m.

Normal building hours resume Monday, December 1st.  The Hatfield Library staff wish the Willamette Community a most wonderful and safe Thanksgiving Break!

Fiction Writer: Ann Pancake

Please join us for the final event of the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a reading and talk by acclaimed novelist and story writer Ann Pancake. The event will take place on Wednesday, November 5 at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.ann-pancake

A West Virginia native, Ann Pancake is the author of the groundbreaking novel Strange as This Weather Has Been, which revolves around an Appalachian family living beneath a mountaintop removal mine. Based on real events, the novel explores the way communities and the environment are devastated by corporate greed and the insatiable demand for fossil fuels. It has drawn comparisons to John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath for its portrayal of ordinary people impacted by social and political forces out of their control and was named one of Kirkus Review’s Top Ten Fiction Books of 2007. Writer and environmental activist Wendell Berry calls it “one of the bravest novels I have ever read.”

Ann lives in Seattle and teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University. Her fiction and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies like Orion, The Georgia Review, Poets and Writers, and New Stories from the South, and her first collection of short stories, Given Ground, won the 2000 Bakeless award. She has also received a Whiting Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her new story collection, Me and My Daddy Listen to Bob Marley, is forthcoming from Counterpoint Press in February 2015.

Read Ann’s essay, “Creative Responses to Worlds Unraveling,” an argument for fiction as a tool of political advocacy, here:

And read an interview with her here:

Scott Nadelson
Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Department of English