Faculty Colloquium: Ortwin Knorr

Please join us Friday, September 29nd at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Presenter: Ortwin Knorr, Associate Professor of Classics
Title: Using Digital Technology in Teaching a College Colloquium about Film

Integrating digital technology into one’s own teaching can be relatively simple yet pay great dividends, as my experience with my College Colloquium, “Ancient Greece and Rome in the Movies,” may demonstrate. In this presentation, I will discuss my use of simple Powerpoints for pre- and post-tests as well as short lectures on visual concepts; the use of a course blog to draw out more reserved students and to start a discussion outside of class; writing assignments that are tied to existing contributor-fed sites such as the Internet Movie Database (imdb); and the final course project, the students’ creation of their own illustrated website about a movie or movie-related topic of their choice, using free and easy-to-learn software like weebly or wix.

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


New Interface Now Live

We have transitioned to a new user interface for the library catalog. Designed with the user experience in mind, the interface from ExLibris should be more intuitive and make finding resources easier.

As we make this transition, let us know if you have any comments or questions about the new catalog. Feel free to send your questions or comments to bkelm@willamette.edu.


New Interface to the Library Catalog

This summer we will be transitioning to a new user interface for the library catalog. We will be transitioning to this new interface in late July 2017.

Designed with the user experience in mind, the interface from ExLibris should be more intuitive and make finding resources easier. As we make this transition, let us know if you have any comments or questions about the new catalog. Feel free to use this form to send us your comments.


Thank you to the Circulation Desk Student Employees

At the Hatfield Library, Circulation Desk student employees are integral to daily operations. Student employees open and close the library, check items in and out, reshelve library materials, ensure items are in correct order, perform building walkthroughs, troubleshoot a variety of technology issues including printer problems, and most importantly, assist any person in the library who needs help. They have answered their fair share of unusual questions and spearheaded or assisted with many different library-related projects. We want to say thank you to all our student employees for their dedication and hard work during the last academic year.

And we would like to say a special thanks and goodbye to our ten graduating seniors:

Maya Jaramillo
Kaitlen McPherson
Rachel Carstensen
Kelly Jones
Isabel Seiden
Sidney Gallardo
Alexander Tripp
Bridget Wulfing
Hiromi Homma
Susana Hernandez

We are particularly grateful to Maya and Kaitlen, who have been working at the Circulation Desk since the beginning of their first year. They have worked hundreds of hours and helped countless people in the library…thanks so much for everything!

Maya Jaramillo

Kaitlen McPherson

 

 

 

 


Finals Week Extended Study Hours

During finals week, the Hatfield Library is open extra hours to help students studying for finals exams. A reference librarian is available for research help until 5 p.m., and we will begin putting out cookies and coffee the first night before Finals until they run out after 10 p.m. if you need a brain food break! Don’t forget the printer in the 24-hour Fish Bowl.
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  • Thurs, May 4: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Fri, May 5: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sat, May 6: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sun, May 7: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 8: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 9: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 10: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Thur, May 11: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri, May 12:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat, May 13:  Noon – 4 p.m.
  • Sun, May 14:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Mon, May 16:  Summer Schedule begins: Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  CLOSED Saturday, Sunday and holidays.

Faculty Colloquium: Maegan Parker Brooks

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this week, Friday, January 27th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our first Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Maegan Parker Brooks
, Assistant Professor of Civic Communication and Media
 
Title:  Emmett’s Life Matters: Enthymematic Reasoning and Memetic Representation in Contemporary Public Discourse

The name, the face, and the story of Emmett Till, the black teenager who was lynched in 1955 for allegedly whistling at a white woman, are reemerging in America’s collective consciousness. This presentation will consider how the figure of Till figures within contemporary verbal and visual media. I will examine popular newspaper and magazine articles, as well as widely-circulated memes, explicating their implicit social knowledge premises in relation to three audience groups. For contemporary activists, establishing connections between Till, the mid-twentieth century Black Freedom Movement, and America’s current racial climate offers direction to a nascent movement. For experientially external yet sympathetic audiences, evoking the Till tragedy provides form and substance to the abstract condition of mourning endured by blacks in America. For those external and previously disinterested audiences, memes visually linking Till to the contemporary deaths of unarmed black youth create dialectical tensions which hold the affective capacity to stimulate an acknowledgment of how post-racial inaction perpetuates entrenched patterns of injustice.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

The Hatfield Library is now providing extended hours for final exams. Also, don’t forget about the free cookies and coffee provided by the library…usually the cookies are made available after 10 p.m. starting on Sunday, Dec. 11th until they run out.

These are the hours for the end of the term:

Monday, Dec. 5 – Thursday, Dec. 8 — 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 9 — 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 10 — 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 11 — 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 12 – Friday, Dec. 16 — 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 17 — 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 18 — CLOSED

Winter break begins on Monday, Dec. 19. During the break, the library will be open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on the weekends. Also, the library (and the rest of campus) will be closed from Dec. 23 through Jan. 2. Regular hours resume on Jan. 17.


Faculty Colloquium: Doing Data Science

chengsmPlease join us tomorrow, Friday, November 4th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Haiyan Cheng
, Associate Professor of Computer Science
 
Title:  Doing Data Science

Computational Science and Engineering combines theory and experiments for scientific discovery. It is interdisciplinary in nature, requiring subject knowledge in 1) applied discipline, 2) mathematics and 3) computer science. With the evolutionary extension of statistics capable of dealing with the massive amount of data produced today, data science has becoming the new trend, and it helped scientific discovery extending from natural science to humanities and social sciences.

My research deals with designing new computational algorithms to make forecast models more accurate. Specifically, I optimally combine observational data with the model forecast data through a method called “Data Assimilation”.

In this talk, I will report how the amount of available observational data has changed and inspired my research. I will report two of my sabbatical projects that involving hands-on data science. The first one is my experience participating a Datathon (an intensive programming competition) at a computational social science conference; using social media data to answer U.S. election related questions. The second one is my experience participating a one-week workshop, using real criminal data to infer networks for predictive policing.

Finally, I will talk about the basics in doing data science and introduce commonly used tools.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Hallie Ford Literary Series: New Voices Showcase

Please join us on Wednesday, November 9 for the final event of the Fall 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a New Voices Showcase featuring readings by debut fiction writers Margaret Malone and Sara Jaffe. The reading will take place in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library at 5 p.m. and is free and open to the public. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

Margaret Malone is the author of the story collection People Like You, winner of the Balcones Fiction Prize and a finalist for the PEN Hemingway Award. Her writing has appeared in The Missouri Review, Oregon Humanities, Propeller Quarterly, Coal City Review, Swink, latimes.com, and elsewhere. margaret-maloneShe is a graduate of Humboldt State University with a B.A. in Philosophy and now lives in Portland, Oregon. Margaret has been a volunteer facilitator with the non-profit Write Around Portland and is a co-host of the artist and literary gathering SHARE. She is the recipient of an Oregon Arts Commission Individual Artist Fellowship, two Regional Arts & Culture Council Project Grants and an Oregon Literary Fellowship.

Read Margaret’s story “The Only One” here: http://www.propellermag.com/March2015/MaloneFictionMarch15.html

Sara Jaffe is a fiction writer whose first novel, Dryland, was published by Tin House Books in September 2015. Her short fiction and criticism have appeared in a variety of publications, including Fence, BOMB, NOON, Paul Revere’s Horse, matchbook, and The Los Angeles Review of Books. She co-edited The Art of Touring (Yeti, 2009), an anthology of writing and visual art by musicians drawing on her experience as guitarist for post-punk band Erase Errata. sara-jaffeSara holds a BA from Wesleyan University and an MFA from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and has received fellowships from the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, RADAR Productions, and the Regional Arts and Culture Council. She is also co-founding editor of New Herring Press, a publisher of prose chapbooks.

Read Sara’s story “Stormchasers” here: http://bombmagazine.org/article/10066/stormchasers

For more information, contact:
Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Willamette University
snadelso@willamette.edu
503-370-6290


Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

During finals week, the Hatfield Library is open extra hours to help students studying for finals exams. Don’t forget the printer in the 24-hour Fish Bowl.  A reference librarian is available for research help until 5 p.m., and we will begin putting out cookies and coffee the first night before Finals until they run out after 10 p.m. if you need a brain food break!

Here are the hours:

  • Thurs, May 5: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Fri, May 6: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sat, May 7: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sun, May 8: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 9: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 10: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 11: 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Thur, May 12: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri, May 13:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat, May 14:  Noon – 4 p.m.
  • Sun, May 15:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Mon, May 16:  Summer Schedule begins: Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  CLOSED Saturday, Sunday and holidays.