Faculty Colloquium: “Sympathy for the Many”

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 3rd at 2:00 pm in the Library Instruction Room of the Hatfield Library for the sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided to accompany this talk. (Please note the change of time and location).

Stephanie DeGooyer, Assistant Professor of English degooyer

“Sympathy for the Many: Can the Novel Represent the Multitude?”

Abstract: Historians of the novel argue that many different readers in the eighteenth century were able to imagine the interior lives of singular protagonists such as Clarissa or Pamela. In this talk I consider if the reverse is possible: can the fictional imagination of one singular person comprehend the enslavement of millions of people? Can one author, one novel, or one protagonist, represent and comprehend the suffering of a multitude or species? Focusing for the most part on eighteenth-century novelist Laurence Sterne and his relationships to freed slave Ignatius Sancho and moral sense philosopher Adam Smith, this talk argues that there is a basic conflict between social and political demands for equality and fictionalized representations of suffering – and that this conflict cannot be simply dismissed as narcissism. Instead, I suggest that the novel is a limited form for the representation of the multitude, and it is from this space of limitation that it must uniquely address the world.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinator

NB: Bobby Brewer-Wallin had to cancel his previously advertised presention on “My Case Is Altered or Bodies of Elizabeth: Code-switching in Solo Performance.” Luckily we were able to get Stephanie DeGooyer to speak instead.


Winter Break Hours

The Hatfield Library has special hours during the Winter Break.
Wed, Dec. 24 – Fri, Jan. 2    CLOSED
Sat – Sun, Jan. 3 – 4     CLOSED
Mon – Fri, Jan. 5 – 9     8 – 5 p.m.
Sat – Sun, Jan. 10 – 11     CLOSED
Mon – Fri, Jan. 12 – 16     8 – 5 p.m.
Sat – Sun, Jan. 17 – 18     CLOSED

Normal building hours resume Monday, January 19th.  The Hatfield Library staff wish the Willamette Community a most wonderful and safe Winter Break and a great start to the new year!


Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

Beginning on Monday, Dec. 1, the Hatfield Library will be open extended hours for final exams. Also, don’t forget about the free cookies and coffee provided by the library…usually the cookies are made available after 10 p.m. starting on Sunday, Dec. 7th until they run out.

These are the hours for the end of the term:

Monday, Dec. 1 – Thursday, Dec. 4 — 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 5 — 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 6 — 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 7 — 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 8 – Friday, Dec. 12 — 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 13 — 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 14 — CLOSED

Winter break begins on Monday, Dec. 15. During the break, the library will be open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on the weekends. Also, the library (and the rest of campus) will be closed from Dec. 24 through Jan. 2. Regular hours resume on Jan. 19.


Thanksgiving Break Hours

The Hatfield Library has special hours during Thanksgiving.

Wed, Nov. 26     7:45 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Thur – Sat, Nov. 27 – 29     CLOSED
Sun, Nov. 30   1 p.m. – 2 a.m.

Normal building hours resume Monday, December 1st.  The Hatfield Library staff wish the Willamette Community a most wonderful and safe Thanksgiving Break!


Fiction Writer: Ann Pancake

Please join us for the final event of the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a reading and talk by acclaimed novelist and story writer Ann Pancake. The event will take place on Wednesday, November 5 at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.ann-pancake

A West Virginia native, Ann Pancake is the author of the groundbreaking novel Strange as This Weather Has Been, which revolves around an Appalachian family living beneath a mountaintop removal mine. Based on real events, the novel explores the way communities and the environment are devastated by corporate greed and the insatiable demand for fossil fuels. It has drawn comparisons to John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath for its portrayal of ordinary people impacted by social and political forces out of their control and was named one of Kirkus Review’s Top Ten Fiction Books of 2007. Writer and environmental activist Wendell Berry calls it “one of the bravest novels I have ever read.”

Ann lives in Seattle and teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University. Her fiction and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies like Orion, The Georgia Review, Poets and Writers, and New Stories from the South, and her first collection of short stories, Given Ground, won the 2000 Bakeless award. She has also received a Whiting Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her new story collection, Me and My Daddy Listen to Bob Marley, is forthcoming from Counterpoint Press in February 2015.

Read Ann’s essay, “Creative Responses to Worlds Unraveling,” an argument for fiction as a tool of political advocacy, here: http://garev.uga.edu/fall13/pancake.html.

And read an interview with her here: http://willowsprings.ewu.edu/interviews/pancake.pdf.

Scott Nadelson
Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Department of English


Summit Upgrade Planned

The Summit request button will be temporarily removed from the WU Worldcat Local Interface Tuesday, April 30th from 11:00 p.m. until around 11 a.m on Wednesday, May 1st, while a system upgrade is being performed. In the meantime, users should feel free to request materials through Interlibrary Loan. After the upgrade is complete, the Summit request button will return. Please contact a library staff member if you experience any problems during this time. Thank you for your patience.


Ultracold and Ultrafast – A Story of Atoms and Light

Please join us for a presentation by Michaela Kleinert (Dept. of Physics) this Friday, April 26th at 3:00 pm in Ford Hall 102 – (Kremer Board Room). The title of her talk is: “Ultracold and Ultrafast – A Story of Atoms and Light”

Ultracold atoms and molecules are very cold indeed: At only about a millonth of the temperature of outer space (a few micro Kelvin), their internal and external motion becomes essentially frozen, and high precision studies of their quantum mechanical properties become possible. This leads to exciting applications ranging from the confirmation of the standard model of particle physics to quantum computers. In this talk I will introduce you to my research lab on ultracold rubidium and calcium atoms, and their molecular dimer RbCa.

I will also give you a glimpse into a much warmer and faster place: Ultrafast industrial lasers. These lasers can be used as “brute force” cutting instruments, but also as high-precision “scissors”. My lab just recently received such a laser. We are interested in studying the behavior of different materials as they are bombarded by high-intensity ultrafast laser pulses (so called ablation studies). Results of these studies have direct consequences for industrial applications of ultrafast laser pulses.