Hallie Ford Literary Series: Successful Strategies by Andrea Stolowitz

Please join us for a special event in the Spring 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, in collaboration with the Department of Theatre: a staged reading of Successful Strategies, a new play by Andrea Stolowitz, twice winner of the Oregon Book Award for drama.

Produced by Theatre 33 and directed by Elisabeth Rothan, the reading will take place on Tuesday, March 15, at 7 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. It is free and open to the public and will be followed by a Q&A with the author.

Successful Strategies is a comedy inspired by the Marivaux play of the same name. The original play deals with the handlings, schemes, and strategies around trying to make love stay in 1733 Burgundy, France, the ancestral home of the Pinot Noir grape. Andrea’s play examines the same questions, but it takes place now, in Oregon, the North American home of Pinot Noir. It’s play about love, grape growing, and wine making in all of their individual and exquisite pains.

Andrea Stolowitz has been Willamette’s resident playwright since 2008, teaching classes in the Departments of English and Theatre. Her plays have been presented and developed at The Cherry Lane (NYC), The Old Globe (SD), The Long Wharf (CT), New York Stage and Film (NY), and Portland Center Stage (OR). The LA Times calls her work “heartbreaking” and the Orange County Register characterizes her approach as a “brave refusal to sugarcoat…issues and tough decisions.” A recipient of Artists Repertory Theater’s $25,000 New Play Commission, Andrea’s latest work Ithaka premiered at the theater in 2013 to critical acclaim. It had its mid-west premiere in 2014 in Chicago’s InFusion Theater. Her play Antarktikos world-premiered at The Pittsburgh Playhouse in March 2013 and was workshopped nationwide at The New Harmony Project (IN), Portland Center Stage’s JAW Festival, and at Seattle Repertory Theater. She also teaches playwriting and screenwriting at the University of Portland.

Listen to Andrea discussing Ithaka on OPB’s Think Out Loud here: http://www.opb.org/thinkoutloud/segment/ithaka-examines-life-returning-veterans/.

Scott Nadelson


1941 Pearl Harbor Willamette Football Team

Guide to the Pearl Harbor Game collection

We’re featuring the archival guide of the 1941 Pearl Harbor Game Collection in which the Willamette Football Team found themselves involved in the infamous Pearl Harbor attack.

Link to the collection: http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4269

Here is an ESPN video interview of some of those involved:http://www.ktrh.com/onair/michael-berry-13986/heres-how-the-willamette-university-football-14182215

1941-pearl-harbor-football-team

The Pearl Harbor Game collection contains .5 linear feet of news articles, letters and transcriptions of interviews with participants, photographs and memorabilia connected with Willamette University’s 1941 football team and its experience in Hawaii in the days following December 7, 1941.

Collection Number:     WUA009

From the archival path finder:  “On board, as passengers, were the football squads of Willamette University and San Jose College, in Honolulu for games with the University of Hawaii at the time of the Japanese attack. These men, under their respective coaches, volunteered in case of emergency to rescue and place in the ship’s boats the seriously wounded men. They drilled at their assignments. In addition, they volunteered to and did feed such wounded as were unable to help themselves. They promoted good morale among the patients in many ways. I consider the services rendered by these young men to be very commendable.”

(Excerpt from a letter written by Frank Knox, Secretary of the Navy, to Willamette University president Carl Knopf commending the athletes’ contributions. Knox is quoting from a report filed by a senior naval officer aboard the Merchant vessel used to evacuate those injured in the bombing of Pearl Harbor.)

Willamette University’s 1941 football team accumulated an 8-2 record, captured the Northwest Conference title, and included four future Willamette University Athletic Hall of Fame selections: Ted Ogdahl, Marvin Goodman, Dick Weisgerber (assistant coach), and Roy “Spec” Keene (coach). However, the football team is best remembered for their contributions immediately following the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on December 7, 1941.

At the end of the 1941 season, Willamette University and San Jose State were invited to Honolulu, Hawaii, to play in a series of games called the Shrine Bowl. The team was accompanied by a number of supporters, including Bearcat enthusiasts Oregon State Senator Douglas McKay and his daughter, Shirley. On December 6, Willamette lost the first game of the Shrine Bowl to the University of Hawaii, 20-6. The following day, as the entire Willamette contingent was preparing to tour the island of Oahu, Pearl Harbor was bombed. Willamette head coach, Spec Keene, volunteered the men, players and supporters alike, to guard the perimeter of the Punahou School in Honolulu for ten days. The women were volunteered as nurses’ aides at a Navy hospital. Unable to fly home, the team remained in Hawaii until December 19, at which time they returned to the mainland aboard the ocean liner SS President Coolidge. While on board, the team bunked in steerage and, in exchange for passage, were assigned as hospital aides attending wounded men until the ship reached San Francisco on Christmas day.

On September 23, 1997, the football team was inducted into the Willamette University Athletic Hall of Fame. Also inducted that year were Wayne and Shirley (McKay) Hadley, longtime supporters of Willamette athletics who were with the football squad in Hawaii.

 


Alternatives to Capitalism Talk

Growing inequality, political stalemate, and climate disruption prompt an important insight. When the old ways no longer produce the outcomes we are looking for, something deeper is occurring. It is time to explore genuine alternatives and new models.

Robin Hahnel, Professor Emeritus of Economics at the American University in Washington, D.C. will talk about “The Next System.”  He currently is Co-Director of Economics for Equity and the Environment.

Robin will give the talk on Monday, November 23, in the Hatfield Room, 4:15—5:30pm.  This event is sponsored by the Peter C. and Bonnie S. Kremer Endowed Chair and the Department of Economics.

Robin-Hahnel


Tree of Giving Book Drive

The annual Tree of Giving Book Drive has officially begun.

The Hatfield Library, The Willamette Store and the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee are seeking donations of new or slightly used children’s books to be donated to Highland Elementary School‘s library. We are also looking for hats, gloves and scarves.

The Willamette Store is offering a 25% discount for items purchased for the Book Drive

The last day to donate is Friday, December 18. Items can be dropped off at The Willamette Store, Hatfield Library or Sparks Athletic Center.

tree-of-giving-book-drive-2015


Faculty Colloquium: Transformational Resilience Workshop

workshop

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, October 2nd at a special time, 2:00 to 5:00 in the Hatfield Room for our fourth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Sue Koger, Professor of Psychology and
Bob Doppelt, Executive Director of The Resource Innovation Group

Title: Transformational Resilience Workshop

Abstract:

Climate change is often thought of as an environmental problem. This is a profound misunderstanding. Climate change is a profound threat to the mental and physical health and psycho-social-spiritual wellbeing of humanity.
This interactive workshop will begin by explaining how a warming planet will adversely affect the mental and physical health of individuals as well as the psycho-social-spiritual wellbeing of organizations, communities, and entire societies. The majority of the workshop will describe the principles and skills of the Resilient Growth model developed by a team of trauma treatment and resilience building specialists that can be used to help individuals and groups cope with and use climate-enhanced adversities to learn, grow and thrive rather than harm themselves or others. Participants will learn and practice a few of the simple skills involved with the model.

They will leave with a clear sense of the threats to individual and psychosocial wellbeing that lie ahead. They will also understand the core elements of a preventative psycho-social-spiritual resilience building model that can help themselves and others learn how to cope with climate-enhanced and other types of traumas and stresses in ways that actually increase personal and collective wellbeing and the condition of the natural environment.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Ann Copeland Papers

We’re highlighting the Virginia Furtwangler aka Ann Copeland papers from the Archives and Special Collections.

Virginia (Walsh) Furtwangler (1932-) is an American-Canadian author, writing under the name Ann Copeland. She was born and raised in Hartford, Connecticut. She attended the Catholic University of American and received her Ph.D. in Modern Literature from Cornell University. Furtwangler spent 13 years as an Ursuline nun, teaching English literature in both high school and college. Her experience as a nun provided inspiration for many of her short stories including the collection in The Golden Thread.

More at: http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4799

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Faculty Colloquium: Doing Disability Studies

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, September 25th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Allison Hobgood, Associate Professor of English

Title: Doing Disability Studies: Equity and Justice Through the Arts and Humanities
Hobgood
Abstract:

“Doing Disability Studies: Equity and Justice Through the Arts and Humanities” invites listeners to consider the role of disability studies in higher education and as an academic pursuit that supports social justice. Specifically, Allison P. Hobgood will explore the power of disability studies in the Humanities, discuss its history and current iterations, and offer some examples of how disability studies helps make our world a more just, inclusive, and equitable place.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: “Sympathy for the Many”

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 3rd at 2:00 pm in the Library Instruction Room of the Hatfield Library for the sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided to accompany this talk. (Please note the change of time and location).

Stephanie DeGooyer, Assistant Professor of English degooyer

“Sympathy for the Many: Can the Novel Represent the Multitude?”

Abstract: Historians of the novel argue that many different readers in the eighteenth century were able to imagine the interior lives of singular protagonists such as Clarissa or Pamela. In this talk I consider if the reverse is possible: can the fictional imagination of one singular person comprehend the enslavement of millions of people? Can one author, one novel, or one protagonist, represent and comprehend the suffering of a multitude or species? Focusing for the most part on eighteenth-century novelist Laurence Sterne and his relationships to freed slave Ignatius Sancho and moral sense philosopher Adam Smith, this talk argues that there is a basic conflict between social and political demands for equality and fictionalized representations of suffering – and that this conflict cannot be simply dismissed as narcissism. Instead, I suggest that the novel is a limited form for the representation of the multitude, and it is from this space of limitation that it must uniquely address the world.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinator

NB: Bobby Brewer-Wallin had to cancel his previously advertised presention on “My Case Is Altered or Bodies of Elizabeth: Code-switching in Solo Performance.” Luckily we were able to get Stephanie DeGooyer to speak instead.


Winter Break Hours

The Hatfield Library has special hours during the Winter Break.
Wed, Dec. 24 – Fri, Jan. 2    CLOSED
Sat – Sun, Jan. 3 – 4     CLOSED
Mon – Fri, Jan. 5 – 9     8 – 5 p.m.
Sat – Sun, Jan. 10 – 11     CLOSED
Mon – Fri, Jan. 12 – 16     8 – 5 p.m.
Sat – Sun, Jan. 17 – 18     CLOSED

Normal building hours resume Monday, January 19th.  The Hatfield Library staff wish the Willamette Community a most wonderful and safe Winter Break and a great start to the new year!


Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

Beginning on Monday, Dec. 1, the Hatfield Library will be open extended hours for final exams. Also, don’t forget about the free cookies and coffee provided by the library…usually the cookies are made available after 10 p.m. starting on Sunday, Dec. 7th until they run out.

These are the hours for the end of the term:

Monday, Dec. 1 – Thursday, Dec. 4 — 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 5 — 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 6 — 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 7 — 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 8 – Friday, Dec. 12 — 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 13 — 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 14 — CLOSED

Winter break begins on Monday, Dec. 15. During the break, the library will be open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on the weekends. Also, the library (and the rest of campus) will be closed from Dec. 24 through Jan. 2. Regular hours resume on Jan. 19.