Library News

National Nutrition Month

Image source: nih.gov Nutrition Month

Image source: NIH.gov Nutrition Month

March is National Nutrition Month! After the past few months of holiday meals, you may be motivated to start eating more nutritiously and exercise regularly.  A big emphasis during this month is simply to make INFORMED CHOICES about the food you eat and to develop sound eating and physical activity habits. Remember to not give up on changing your goal of living healthier.  Good habits take a long time to establish (66 days or more).

Here are a few tips taken from EATRIGHT.ORG:

  1. Explore New Foods, Flavors and ‘Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.’ If your food begins to loose its luster, adding more nutrition and pleasure to each meal is as easy as expanding the range of foods you choose. Try one new fruit, vegetable or whole grain every week. Start small by picking a different type of apple, a different color potato or a new flavor of whole-grain rice until you are comfortable picking entirely new things that you’ve never tried or heard of before.
  2. The next time you eat out, choose a restaurant that features ethnic foods from Asia, Europe or Africa. These restaurants often feature menus filled with healthy options that will be new to you.
  3. If you prepare your own meals, add a pinch of this or that to give your regular dishes some additional zing.  Remember, you have about 10,000 taste buds, so don’t be afraid to try something new.

The National Library of Medicine has some great suggestions for eating habits and behaviors:

  1. A food journal is a good tool to help you learn about your eating habits. Keep a food journal for 1 week.
    • Write down what you eat, how much, and what times of day you are eating.
    • Include notes about what else you were doing and how you were feeling, such as being hungry, stressed, tired, or bored. For example, maybe you were at work and were bored. So you got a snack from a vending machine down the hall from your desk.
    • At the end of the week, review your journal and look at your eating patterns. Decide which habits you want to change.
  2. Reflect on your food journal.  Look at your journal and circle any regular or repetitive triggers. Some of these might be:
    • You see your favorite snack in the pantry or vending machine
    • When you watch television
    • You feel stressed by something at work or in another area of your life
    • You have no plan for dinner after a long day
    • You go to work events where food is served
    • You stop at fast-food restaurants for breakfast and choose high fat, high calorie foods
    • You need a pick-me-up toward the end of your workday
  3. Replace your old habits with new ones.
    1. Find health choices for snacks and plan ahead. Take only a small portion, put it in a dish and put the rest away. Eat fruit and yogurt in the mid-afternoon about 3 or 4 hours after lunch.
    2. Eat only when you are hungry. Eating when you are feel worried, tense, or bored also leads to overeating. Instead, call a friend or go for a walk to help you feel better.
    3. Eat Slowly. Eating too quickly leads to overeating when the food you have eaten has not yet reached your stomach and told your brain you are full. You will know you are eating too quickly if you feel stuffed about 20 minutes after you stop eating.
    4. Plan your meals. Know what you will eat ahead of time so you can avoid buying unhealthy foods (impulse buying) or eating at fast-food restaurants.
    5. Get rid of unhealthy foods. Put them out of sight or in hard to reach places.  Replace your candy dish with a bowl of fruit or nuts.
  4. An old saying goes: “Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.”
    1. Breakfast sets the tone for the day. A hearty, healthy breakfast will give your body the energy it needs to get you to lunch.
    2. Plan a good lunch that will satisfy you, and a healthy afternoon snack that will keep you from becoming to hungry before dinner time.
    3. Avoid skipping meals. Missing a regular meal or snack often leads to overeating or making unhealthy choices.

     

Don’t forget that we have a huge selection of books dealing with nutrition.  A few of them are highlighted this month on our WU Reads page.

Poet Wendy Willis

Please join us for the second event in the Spring 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University: an Alumni Showcase, featuring WU grad and poet Wendy Willis on Wednesday, March 12. Wendy will read from and discuss her recently published first collection of poems, Blood Sisters of the Republic, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of the library. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store. The event is free and open to the public.wendy_willis

Wendy splits her time between her roles as mother, poet, and advocate for democracy. She is the Executive Director of the Policy Consensus Initiative, a national non-profit organization devoted to improving democratic governance. In addition to publishing poetry and essays in a variety of national and regional journals and serving as an adjunct fellow in poetry at the Attic Institute, Willis has served as a federal public defender and as the law clerk to Chief Justice Wallace P. Carson, Jr. of the Oregon Supreme Court. She graduated magna cum laude from Georgetown Law Center and holds a B.A. from Willamette University. She lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband, his son and her two young daughters.

About Blood Sisters of the Republic, the poet Stanley Plumly says, “Wendy Willis is a poet of serious heart, a fact of enormous importance to the political and personal terms of her first book. While her politics lie in a generosity of spirit, her affections border on the extravagant. There is something wonderfully wild at the center of her poems, a freedom earned by craft. Blood Sisters of the Republic is as much about its local life as it is about national conscience. Plentitude and complexity are the hallmarks of its voice. And love is its signature.”

Sample one of Wendy’s poems here: http://therumpus.net/2013/04/national-poetry-month-day-6-swim-lesson-no-3-by-wendy-willis/.

Or read her essay “On Writing and Subversion” here: http://wendywillisdotme.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/a-poetry-pep-talk-on-writing-and-subversion/

Come celebrate this Willamette success story!

Scott Nadelson
Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Department of English
(503) 370-6290
snadelso@willamette.edu

Edible Book Festival, 2014 Announcement

edible-books-2014

The Mark O. Hatfield Library invites you to participate in the third annual
EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!

Friday, March 14, 2014.  Hatfield Room.

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year.  Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

Some of last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle Public Library, UCLA, and Duke University. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Free to enter– no registration required.  Drop off your entry in the Hatfield Room on March 14 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.  If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display.  Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book until 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

All entries will be on display from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.  Even if you don’t enter, you can cast a vote for your favorite edible book.  At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—David Craig (Biology), Ford Schmidt (Hatfield Library), and a CLA student (tbd) —will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Student Entry
  • Most Literary
  •  Most Creative
  • Punniest
  •  People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners.  For more information and to view all photos of the last two year’s entries, go to:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2013/03/19/edible-book-festival-2013-results/

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2012/04/06/firstedible-books-festival-2012/

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu

Prizes awarded:

  • People’s Choice – “The Monster Book of Monsters” by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman.
  • Best Student Entry – “One Cake to Rule Them All” by Kelsey Kinavey.
  • Most Creative – “Lord of Pies” by Kelly Slaughter.
  • Most Literary – (Tie) “The Picture of Dorian Souffle” by Maureen Ricks; “Lay’s Miserables” by Katie Mariman.
  • Punniest – (Three-way tie) “Their Fries Were Watching Cod” by Sophie Hearn; “Their Eyes Were Watching Cod” by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar; “Pride and Prego Dish” by Liz Butterfield. 
  • Honorable Mention – “Hop on Pop” by Sara Amato.

 

“The Monster Book of Monsters”

Inspired by Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
By J.K. Rowling
Created by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman

People’s Choice

 

 

“One Cake to Rule Them All”

Inspired by The Lord of the Rings By JRR Tolkein
Created by Kelsey Kinavey

Best Student Entry

 

 

  “Lord of the Pies”

Inspired by Lord of the Flies
By William Golding
Created by Kelly Slaughter

Most Creative

  The Picture of Dorian Souffle

Inspired by The Picture of Dorian Gray
By Oscar Wilde
Created by Maureen Ricks

(Tie) Most Literary

 

Lay’s Miserables

Inspired by Les Miserables
By Victor Hugo
Created by Katie Mariman

(Tie) Most Literary

 

Their Fries Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Sophie Hearn

(Tie) Punniest

 

Their Eyes Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar

(Tie) Punniest

Pride and Prego Dish

Inspired by Pride and Prejudice
By Jane Austen
Created by Liz Butterfield

(Tie) Punniest

 

Hop on Pop

Inspired by Hop on Pop
By Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel)
Created by Sara Amato

Honorable Mention

 

 

 

Featuring Health Source

fruit-slcdWe’re are featuring the database Health Source this month in celebration of National Nutrition Month.   It is one of our lesser known electronic resources, but extremely useful if you are researching health or nutritional topics.

Health Source provides the full text to over 270 periodicals covering nutrition, exercise, medical self-care, drugs and alcohol, and much more. You’ll find plenty of scholarly articles in this database, but in addition to the full text offerings, this database indexes and abstracts for over 430 periodicals.

This database also provides full text for over 1,090 pamphlets and 23 books.  Health Source is an Ebsco Host databases, so you may recognize the interface.

ebsco-logoRead our previous blog post about National Nutrition Month.

Willamette Libraries Display

shushing-action-figureThere are not too many places where you can see a “Shushing Librarian Action Figure,” but if you check out the display on the second floor of the Hatfield Library, you’ll see this figure along with some wonderful photos and assorted items relating to the history of Willamette’s libraries.

Libraries at Willamette have a long and interesting history.  The original library was housed on the third floor of the University Hall, later renamed Waller Hall.  When the building was rebuilt after the 1919 fire, the library was relocated to the second floor.

A new library building was built and the library moved from Waller to what is now Smullin.  One Friday in May 1938, classes were cancelled and students and staff moved the collection carrying the books in their arms to the new location. And did you know that in the ’80s, two cats lived in the old Smullin library?  When the library moved to its current location, the cats were adopted by library staff members and taken to their homes.  Any guesses as to the names of the cats?*

moving-the-libraryDo you know when Willamette got its second library? (This excludes the separate music library that was housed in the Fine Arts building).  The J.W. Long Law Library opened in 1967.  In the big flood of 1996, the Law library suffered some major damage.

Photos capture the big move as books were loaded onto carts by students and library staff, and rolled over from the Smullin library to the new Mark O. Hatfield Library in 1986.

The exhibit also includes interesting library artifacts.  You might remember or have seen some of the technology the library used to employ, such as Zip Disks.  But you probably have never seen a 7-inch electric eraser!  We even still have the metal plates that were used to help guide the eraser and avoid damaging the printed ink.  wu-libraries-display

Imagine what it would be like if we were still using card catalogs to look up books, or print indexes for journal articles.  We are very fortunate to have our digital catalogs and databases of today.

A lot has changed for our campus libraries, and they will undoubtedly continue to change to meet the needs of the Willamette Community.  Take this opportunity to view the amazing history of Willamette’s libraries!

*Snooter (a striped “tiger” cat) and Pee Wee (a tortoiseshell cat).  Pee Wee was later renamed to Kit; both cats were female and enjoyed long, happy lives.

Take a Book, Leave a Book

take-a-bookIntroducing the new Book Swap bookcase located in the Hatfield Library’s Fish Bowl (24 hour study).  The idea is simple: If you see a book you like, take it… just consider leaving a book in exchange. 

The initiative for this program came from the Hatfield Library’s Reading Group, which has a goal to encourage life long reading habits.  One idea the group had been considering was to create a book exchange area somewhere in the library for books (or dvds, magazines, etc.) that had been donated to the library, but we already owned or didn’t fit with our collection guidelines.  One of the librarians noticed that an “ancient” wooden book cart was on its way to the campus surplus.  The library staff really wanted to reuse the book cart in some fashion, so the thought of reusing it for a Book Swap bookcase occurred to a librarian who had seen a similar arrangement at another university.

bk-stack-logo-med

The wooden cart most likely came from the original Willamette Library that was housed in Smullin Hall. Someone from Willamette’s facilities department back in the 1950s or 60s most likely built it.

Over the winter break the wheels were removed, a wood base added, and a fresh coat of paint and customized graphic were given to the former cart.  And voilà!  We now have a creative “new” way to share books.  It is kind of neat to incorporate and reuse such an interesting bit of Willamette’s history.

book-swap-hand

The concept for “take a book, leave a book” is not new. Various renditions of this sharing system have existed for many years and occurs nationally.  Salem, for example, has a few similar public “Little Free Library” stations scattered about the city. Willamette University had a similar system several years ago that essentially functioned out of a wicker basket in the Dean’s Office.  The new bookcase in the Fish Bowl makes this much more accessible to students, faculty, staff, and others connected to Willamette.

We encourage our Willamette community to participate in our Take a Book, Leave a Book program.  For comments and questions, please contact Joni Roberts, Associate University Librarian for Public Services and Collection Development,  jroberts@willamette.edu.

 

 

 

 

Pacific Northwest Artists Archive

Pacific Northwest Artists Archive pnaa

The Pacific Northwest Artists Archive (also known as PNAA) is a collection of materials related to the careers of artists who are or were active in Oregon and Washington for the major portion of their careers.

Developed as a complement to the permanent collection of the Hallie Ford Museum and housed at Willamette University’s Hatfield Library, the archive contains artists’ correspondence and writings, exhibition catalogues and brochures, press clippings, photographs, slides of artworks, business files, and other materials related to the life work of particular artists.

Below are the online finding aids and list of additional artist collections.  The collection home page is located at http://library.willamette.edu/archives/collections/pnaa/.

Finding Aids

 

Contact the University Archivist for information relating to the following collections:

  • Kathleen Gemberling Adkison
  • Glen Alps papers
  • Rex Amos papers
  • Ruth Grover papers
  • Carl Hall papers
  • Roger Hull research files on Carl Hall
  • Roger Hull research files on Charles Heaney
  • Roger and Bonnie Hull research files on Myra Wiggins
  • Barbara and Jack McClarty papers
  • Henk Pander papers
  • C.S. Price collection
  • Jan and Judith Zach papers

 

Digital Collections

Whiting Tennis Exhibit

The Mark O. Hatfield Library is housing a temporary exhibit of Whiting Tennis, a contemporary mixed media artist from Seattle, in conjunction with the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University.  While the main Whiting Tennis exhibit is held at the Hallie Ford Museum January 18th through March 23rd (2014), we have one 3-dimensional art work and two paintings on display near the entrance of the library.

The architectural forms that are commonly present throughout Tennis’s work are abstracts of human and animal characteristics. They consist of repurposed wood or collaged prints made from wood grain.

For more details about the Whiting Tennis exhibit, visit http://www.willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2013-14/whiting_tennis.html.

Below are a few photos from the exhibit, and some suggested books from our library that compliment the exhibit.

Whiting-Tennis-Related-Readings

Camp

“Camp,” 2005. Oil on canvas. By Whiting Tennis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tractor

“Tractor,” 2010. Cast plaster. By Whiting Tennis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

brown-tower

“Brown Tower,” 2008. Acrylic on panel. By Whiting Tennis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title and Author Call Number
Black : the history of a color / Michel Pastoureau. BF789.C7 P3813 2009
The last American man / Elizabeth Gilbert. CT275.C768 G5 2002
Faces in the forest : First Nations art created on living trees / Michael D. Blackstock. E78.B9 B57 2001
Listening to our ancestors : the art of native life along the north pacific coast / introduction by chief Robert Joseph. E78.N78 L58 2005
Tangible visions : Northwest Coast Indian shamanism and its art / Allen Wardwell. E78.N78 W283 1996
In the spirit of mother earth : nature in Native American art / text by Jeremy Schmidt ; captions by Laine Thom. E98.A7 S358 1994
Folklore recycled : old traditions in new contexts / Frank de Caro. GR105.D42 2013
Signs, streets, and storefronts : a history of architecture and graphics along America’s commercial corridors / Martin Treu. HF5841 .T74 2012
Loneliness as a way of life / Thomas Dumm. JA66 .D84 2008
From head to hand : art and the manual / David Levi Strauss. N71 .S879 2010
Architecture : art / Philip Jodidio. N72.A75 J63 2005
Christ to COKE : how image becomes icon / Martin Kemp. N72.S6 K36 2012
Culture or trash? : a provocative view of contemporary painting, sculpture, and other costly commodities / by James Gardner. N6493 1980 .G37
Collage, assemblage, and the found object / Diane Waldman. N6494.C6 W35
Minimalism : art of circumstance N6494.M5 B34
Pop art : a continuing history N6494.P6 L58
Lifelike / Siri Engberg ; with contributions from Michael Lobel, Josiah McElheny, and Rochelle Steiner. N6494.R4 E39 2012
Raw + material = art : found, scavenged, and upcycled / Tristan Manco. N6498.E26 M36 2012
American visions : the epic history of art in America / by Robert Hughes. N6505 .H84 1997
Louise Nevelson : a passionate life N6512.5.A25 A33 2008
Abstract expressionism N6512.5.A25 A89 1990
Basquiat N6537.B233 A42 2006
Heat waves in a swamp : the paintings of Charles Burchfield N6537.B86 A4 2009
John Cole : the enduring northwest landscape / essays by Deloris Tarzan Ament. N6537.C5927 A4 2003
Louise Nevelson : the fourth dimension. N6537.N478 A4 1980
Claes Oldenburg : an anthology. N6537.O4 A4 1995b
James Castle : his life & art N6537.C363 T78 2004
Paradise garden : a trip through Howard Finster’s visionary world / by Robert Peacock with Annibel Jenkins N6537.F464 A4 1996
Arshile Gorky : a retrospective N6537.G65 A4 2009
Jasper Johns N6537.J6 C74 1994
Tony Smith : architect, painter, sculptor / Robert Storr ; with essays by John Keenen and Joan Pachner. N6537.S618 A4 1998
Whiting tennis N6537.T47 A4 2012
Cy Twombly: a retrospective N6537.T86 V374 1994x
Andy Warhol : a retrospective N6537.W28 A4 1989
Franz West, to build a house you start with the roof : work 1972-2008 / Darsie Alexander ; contributions by Tom Eccles, Rachel Harrison and Eric Banks. N6811.5.W454 A4 2008
Picasso black and white / Carmen Giménez ; with essays by Dore Ashton, Olivier Berggruen, Carmen Giménez, and Richard Shiff. N6853.P5 A4 2012a
The artist outsider : creativity and the boundaries of culture / edited by Michael D. Hall and Eugene W. Metcalf, Jr. ; with Roger Cardinal. N7432.5.A78 A78 1994
Art in every-day life / by Harriet Goldstein and Vetta Goldstein. N7438.G6 1940
Details in contemporary architecture / [edited by] Christine Killory and René Davids. NA2840 .D454 2007
Main Street to Miracle Mile : American roadside architecture / Chester H. Liebs. NA6212.L54
Eccentric objects : rethinking sculpture in 1960s America / Jo Applin. NB212 .A67 2012
Claes Oldenburg / edited by Nadja Rottner. NB237.O42 C59 2012
H.C. Westermann NB237.W44 A4 2001
Drawing Surrealism NC95.5.S9 J66 2012
The reality of appearance; the trompe l’œil tradition in American painting, by Alfred Frankenstein. ND210 .C3 1970
Philip Guston ND237.G8 S76
Charles E. Heaney : memory, imagination, and place ND237.H42 H85 2005
Artifice and illusion : the art and writing of Samuel van Hoogstraten / Celeste Brusati. ND653.H79 B78 1995
Trompe-l’oeil, painted architecture / by Miriam Milman. ND1410.M5513
The paintings of Charles Burchfield : north by midwest ND1839.B8 M33 1997
Recycled, re-seen : folk art from the Global Scrap Heap / Charlene Cerny and Suzanne Seriff, editors ; studio photography by John Bigelow Taylor. NK600 .R4 1996
American anthem : masterworks from the American Folk Art Museum / Stacy C. Hollander with Brooke Davis Anderson NK805 .A644 2001
Five star folk art : one hundred American masterpieces / Jean Lipman … [et al.]. NK805 .F56
Folk art / Carol Crown & Cheryl Rivers, volume editors. NK805 .F65 2013
The colossus of roads : myth and symbol along the American highway / Karal Ann Marling NK805.M27
Marvelous monsters : recent works by Heidi Preuss Grew / essay by Ricardo de Mambro Santos. NK4210.P748 D45 2010
Quilts : masterworks from the American Folk Art Museum NK9112 .W37 2010
Artists in wood; American carvers of cigar-store Indians, show figures, and circus wagons. NK9712.F73
Essays on the blurring of art and life / Allan Kaprow ; edited by Jeff Kelley. NX504 .K36 1993
Abandoned New England : landscape in the works of Homer, Frost, Hopper, Wyeth, and Bishop / Priscilla Paton. NX653.N48 P37 2003
On the highest hill / Roderick Haig-Brown ; introduction by Laurie Ricou. PR9199.3.H29 O5 1994
Home ground : language for an American landscape PS169.L35 H66 2006
Westernness : a meditation PS271 .W55 2006
The contemporary American comic epic : the novels of Barth, Pynchon, Gaddis, and Kesey PS374.H86 S23
Franny and Zooey PS3537.A426 F7
Angle of repose PS3537.T316 A8
The best of Edward Abbey PS3551.B2 A6 1984
The hermit’s story : stories PS3552.A8213 H47 2002
Cathedral : stories PS3553.A7894 C3 1989
I am one of you forever : a novel / by Fred Chappell. PS3553.H298 I15 1987
Ricochet river PS3553.O336 U6 1992
Wild life : a novel PS3557.L65 W5 2000
Native / William Haywood Henderson. PS3558.E4944 N38
Sometimes a great notion / Ken Kesey ; introduction by Charles Bowden. PS3561.E667 S65 2006
Postcards PS3566.R697 P67 1992
House Keeping / Marilynne Robinson PS3568 .O3125 H6
My abandonment PS3568.O327 M9 2009
Set this house in order : a romance of souls / Matt Ruff. PS3568.U3615 S48 2004
The power of the dog PS3569.A83 P6
The forest lover / Susan Vreeland. PS3572.R34 F67 2004
The orchardist : a novel  / Amanda Coplin. PS3603.O647 O73 2012
A painter’s life : a novel / by K. B. Dixon. PS3604.I954 P34 2010
Mink river : a novel / Brian Doyle. PS3604.O9547 M56 2010
The girl who fell from the sky : a novel PS3604.U757 G57 2011
West of here : a novel / Jonathan Evison. PS3605.V57 W47 2011
The greening of Ben Brown : a novel PS3619.T7456 G74 2005
Lean on Pete : a novel / Willy Vlautin. PS3622.L38 L43 2010
The story of Edgar Sawtelle : a novel / David Wroblewski. PS3623.R63 S76 2008
Out stealing horses / Per Petterson ; translated by Anne Born. PT8951.26.E88 U813 2007
Julie of the wolves / by Jean Craighead George ; pictures by John Schoenherr. PZ7.G2933 Ju
My side of the mountain / written and illustrated by Jean Craighead George. PZ7.G2933 My
Island of the Blue Dolphins / Scott O’Dell. PZ7.O237 Is
Wildwood PZ7.M516353 Wi 2011
Harmony and conflict in the living world / by Alexander F. Skutch ; illustrated by Dana Gardner. QH501 .S54 2000
Images of animals : anthropomorphism and animal mind / Eileen Crist. QL751 .C8824 1999
In defense of garbage / Judd H. Alexander. TD791 .A528
Walker Evans : signs / with an essay by Andrei Codrescu. TR654 .E918 1998

 

Feb 15 Downtime for RefWorks and Proquest Databases

On February 15, 2014 ProQuest will make improvements to its internal systems to accommodate a growing number of users and to reduce the need for future downtime.

To minimize the impact to you and your users these enhancements will be installed during an eight hour window of typically low usage from 10:00 UTC through 18:00 UTC.

During this time the following ProQuest products will not be available:

  • ProQuest
  • ProQuest Dialog
  • ProQuest Congressional
  • ProQuest K12 databases
  • ProQuest Genealogy databases
  • ProQuest Digital Microfilm
  • RefWorks

New Database: Scopus

SCOP-WOSWe have replaced our Web of Science databases, a package consisting of the Science Citation Index, the Social Sciences Citation Index, and the Arts & Humanities Citation index, with a new citation database, Scopus. We appreciate that Web of Science is used by many of you at Willamette, so we did not take this decision lightly. Before making this decision we examined content and functionality for Scopus and Web of Science; given these factors and that Scopus is a fraction the price, the decision was clear.

Currently, the main content differences are that Scopus covers more current content while Web of Science has deeper historical coverage.  Scopus indexes roughly 20,000 journals while Web of Science covers about 12,300 journal titles.  To give you a perspective on the number of unique journal titles that are not indexed by the other, Scopus currently indexes over 15,000 unique journals while Web of Science indexes nearly 4,400 journals not covered in Scopus.  A substantial amount of journal titles are indexed by both databases.

Scopus will have the same “Find It @ Willamette” button that links to the library catalog for fulltext, print, and interlibrary loan options.  Scopus also works smoothly with the citation tool called RefWorks.  In case you would like to know more about these two databases, here’s a link to more info: http://hlwiki.slais.ubc.ca/index.php/Scopus_vs._Web_of_Science

The Scopus database will be available for use starting in January, and our access to Web of Science will cease at the end of December.  If you have any questions about this process, please contact Ford Schmidt (fschmidt@willamette.edu, extension x5407).