“The Collegian” Online Archive

Presentation1Willamette University’s long running newspaper, the Collegian, is now available digitally and fully keyword searchable. With unprecedented access to history at your fingertips, what will you search for?

Beginning in November 2013, over 100 years of Collegian issues needed to be unbound and assessed for completeness. Microfilm copies were used to fill in any gaps. The unbound Collegians were then mailed to iArchives and digitized. Once scanning was complete, each image was reviewed to ensure its readability. The Collegian is now searchable, and browsable, all the way back to its first issue in 1875.

Digitization is complete!

The Collegian is available at: http://library.willamette.edu./archives/collegian


Rising to the Climate Challenge

Please join us this Friday, October 24th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fourth Faculty Colloquium of this year.

Our speaker will be:

Sue Koger, Professor of Psychology

Title: Rising to the Climate Challenge: Insights from Psychological Research

Sue Koger

Abstract: Despite increasing societal rhetoric about environmental sustainability, many relevant behaviors remain unchanged. I argue that this is because effective and sustainable solutions to climate change and other “environmental” problems require an understanding of the human (i.e., psychological) influences that created the problems in the first place, and that maintain the status quo. In this talk, I’ll describe some of the barriers to change, as well as strategies for overcoming them — both as individuals and collectively.


A Contemporary Bestiary

“A Contemporary Bestiary”

September 13 – December 21, 2014

Melvin Henderson-Rubio Gallery

Robert McCauley, [italics] Edge of Town II [/italics] (detail), 2012
Robert McCauley, Edge of Town II (detail), 2012
In cooperation with the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, the Hatfield Library is
housing a temporary exhibit to go with the museum’s current exhibit,
Contemporary Bestiary.  The museum exhibit “features work by artists from
Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana who incorporate animal imagery in
their artwork as a means to address a wide variety of issues.”  The exhibit
includes birds, frogs, dogs, cats, fish, cows, horses, and more and runs
from September 13 through December 21, 2014.  The library has two wonderful
paintings on display near the entrance of the library as well as a
collection of books that complement the exhibit.

For more details about the Contemporary Beastiary exhibit, visit
http://www.willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2014-15/a_contemporary_bestiary.html.

 

 


Calling All Political Junkies!!

Gandalf for PresidentWith election season upon us, be sure and check out the great display of election memorabilia from the political collections of the Willamette archives on the second floor of the library.  The exhibit features bumper stickers, lawn signs, buttons and a variety of other interesting campaign materials.  An adjoining temporary exhibit showcases campaign items from the personal collections of library staff and friends.  Come take a look!   And don’t forget to vote!


Hallie Ford Literary Series: a New Voices Showcase

Please join us for the second event in the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series: a New Voices Showcase, featuring readings by poet Jennifer Richter and essayist Elena Passarello on Tuesday, October 21. The event will take place at 5 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.

 

Richter_JenJennifer Richter was awarded a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lectureship in Poetry by Stanford University, where she taught in the Creative Writing Program for four years. Her poetry collection Threshold was named a 2011 Oregon Book Award Finalist by former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky. Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Natasha Trethewey chose Threshold as winner of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry Open Competition.

Listen to Jennifer read one of her poems here: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/weekly-poem-prayer-for-the-hanoi-man-who-waits-for-breakdowns-on-his-block/

elena-passarelloElena Passarello’s essays on pop culture, music, the performing arts, and the natural world have appeared in Slate, Creative Nonfiction, Normal School, Ninth Letter, and the Iowa Review, among other publications. Her debut nonfiction collection, Let Me Clear My Throat (Sarabande 2012), explores the human voice in popular performance, and she co-wrote a series of devised nonfiction monologues for the 2012 music writing anthology Pop When the World Falls Apart (Duke University Press). A recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts, and the University of Iowa Museum of Art, she teaches at Oregon State University.

And read an interview with Elena here: http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2012/11/28/voices-carry-an-interview-with-elena-passarello/


Willamette Photo Collection

Campus Photographs Collection

To the right, “Class of 1919 in the shape of a W and 19.”

We’re highlighting the Willamette University Campus Photograph Collection from the University Archives this month.  It is comprised of over 2,500 items including photographic prints, negatives, slides, and copy prints of sketches and blueprints, is a rich documentary resource covering nearly a century and a half of Willamette’s history. A strength of the collection is the visual documentation it provides of Willamette’s ever-developing campus, particularly the buildings and landscape. Images show ground-breakings, construction, renovations, fires, and demolitions of various buildings.  Below is a sample of what you will find in this wonderful collection.

This online collection is available for viewing at:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!search:search:aphotos/dicoll^campus+photographs^all^and!

state-street-salem-oregon-1925
“Aerial view in 1925 of the College of Medicine, Willson Park, and the First United Methodist Church.”

Chris-Sprague-Baxter-Hall-corner-stone
“Chris Sprague placing a cornerstone in a wall of Baxter Hall.”

Atkinson-library-circulation-desk
“Atkinson library circulation desk”

"Atkinson Super Computer"
“Atkinson Super Computer”

art-class-with-Robert-Hess
“Art class with Robert Hess and two students.”

chemistry-lab-Collins-Science-Hall
“Chemistry Labs in Collins Science Hall.”

Banned Books Week 2014

banned-bksBanned Books Week is officially Sept 21-27. Celebrate your freedom to read by reading a book from our current Banned Books display, which will be kept up through October on the first floor of the library.  We encourage you to check them out!

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read.  It highlights the value of free and open access to information, and brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

FUN FACTS:

Over this past decade, 5,099 challenges were reported to the Office for Intellectual Freedom. These are the top five reasons…

1,577 challenges due to “sexually explicit” material;
1,291 challenges due to “offensive language”;
989 challenges due to materials deemed “unsuited to age group”;
619 challenged due to “violence”‘ and
361 challenges due to “homosexuality.”
(Source: http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10)

 

2013

Out of 307 challenges as reported by the Office for Intellectual Freedom, the following are the top five most challenged books (Interestingly, the number of challenges are down by 157 challenges from last year.)

  1. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group, violence
  2. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence
  3. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E.L. James
    Reasons
    : Nudity, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  5. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group
  6. A Bad Boy Can Be Good for A Girl, by Tanya Lee Stone
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit
  7. Looking for Alaska, by John Green
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  8. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
    Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  9. Bless Me Ultima, by RudolfoAnaya
    Reasons: Occult/Satanism, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  10. Bone (series), by Jeff Smith
    Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence

For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week visit the ALA Banned Books web site:

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek

Source: ALA Banned Books web site


Poet: Marilyn Chin

Marilyn Chin, the award-winning author of a novel and four volumes of poetry, including Rhapsody in Plain Yellow, The Phoenix Gone, the Terrace Empty, and the newly released Hard Love Province will be the first speaker in the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series. Born in Hong Kong and raised in Portland, Oregon, her books have become Asian American classics and are taught in classrooms all over the world.chin2 In addition to teaching in the MFA program at San Diego State University, she serves as a mentor on the international faculty of the City University of Hong Kong’s low-residency MFA program, the first of its kind in Asia. Chin’s talk will take place on Thursday, October 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. Books will be for sale, courtesy of the Willamette Store.


Colloquium Curiosities Collection

During the month of September come visit the “Colloquium Curiosities” display on the first floor of the library.  This exhibit features books and videos related to the topics covered in this year’s College Colloquium classes.  Subjects range from Africa in the Global Era to Willamette Naturalist 2.0.  Check it out!

colloquium-curious

Here is a sampling:

GV 944.A4 A45 2010 African Soccerscapes Africa in the Global Era
PN 1995.9.R68 C87 2005 Big Screen Rome Ancient Greece and Rome in the Movies
JZ 1351 .S25 2006 Bridges, not barriers: the American dream and the global community At Home in the World? Appraising Global Citizenship
BV 4639.A6513 1995 Love and Saint Augustine Augustine
PN 2080.B47 2013 2013: Best Men’s Stage Monologues Autotopography
NX 650.C676 J37 2010 Chroma: the book of color The Beauty, Mystery, Terror of Color
SD 421.P93 1995 Fire on the Rim Beyond the Rim: the Life and Times of the Grand Canyon
Q 223.S33 2009 Lies, damned lies, and science Chance in the News
QE 581.A43 2009 Cataclysms on the Columbia Collaboration and Competition
HE 8675.L49 The invisible medium Community Radio
JZ 1773.F47 2006 Global Shadows Consumer Culture in Africa
GT 365.K6 1999 China’s living houses Eat, Drink: Men and Women in China
ML 2075 .G65 2005 Tunes for ‘toones: music and the Hollywood cartoon Encore? Western Classical Music in America
KF 4550 .C569 2011 Constitution 3.0: freefom and technological change Ethics in Information Technology
N 5303.R513 2004 Historical Grammar of the Visual Arts Exploring Visual Culture
TX 551 .N3977 2012 Why calories count: from science to politics Fat! : the science, culture, and politics of weight
B 68 .S55 2001 The Simpsons and philosophy: the d’oh! Of Homer Forms of Irony: Images, Narratives, and Meanings
BJ 1461 .V615 2013 Causes, laws, and free will: why determinism doesn’t matter Freedom and Determinism
E 98 .F6 N386 2004 Native American storytelling: a reader of myths and legends From Pygmalion to the Phantom of the Opera: Myths of yesterday and Today
BF 575.L8 K37 2011 The curious history of love From SOMETHING GREEK to Happiness
PS 374.C68 M33 2007 The hippie narrative Hippies to Holy Rollers
QC 902.9 .S28 2012 Saving a million species: extinction risk from climate change Innovation, Intelligence, and Extinction: The Emerging Web of Life
BD 438.5 .H64 2007 I am a strange loop Know Thyself
HT 167 .B464 2014 People habit: 25 ways to think about greener, healthier cities The Livable City
RC 49.F58 Work, stress, disease, and life expectancy Longevity Across the Globe
QA 93 .S77 2012 The joy of x: a guided tour of math, from one to infinity Math in America
ML 74.7 .D83 2005 Virtual music: how the Web got wired for sound Music in the Electronic Age
RA 1220 .T45 2005 The poison paradox: chemicals as friends and foes A Poison By Any Other Name
HC 110 .P6 A54 2013 The American way of poverty: how the other half still lives Poverty & Public Policy: Implictions for Education
PN 1590.G39 D65 2010 Theatre & Sexuality Queer Drama: AIDS, Race, and the Perfromance of Sexuality
E 840.6 .H36 2013 Litte Red: Three passionate lives through the sixties and beyond Revolution as a Vocation
Q 172.5.P77 S48 2002 Why people believe weird things Science and Pseudoscience
E184.B89 K53 2009 Strength in what remains Telling Tales of Transnationalism
HF 5429.215.C6 W35 2011 Walmart in China US-China Rebalancing
F 884.Y6 A66 2005 Living among headstones Visual Stories of Who We Are
HD 1691.F55 2011 The big thirst Whiskey’s for Drinking; Water’s for Fighting
F 884.S2 R67 1999 A natural history of Minto Brown Willamette Naturalist 2.0

MOHL Research Awards 2014

mohl-research-pen

To start the new semester off on a bright note, the Hatfield Library is pleased to announce the winners of our MOHL Research Award.  This award is given for a student paper in any discipline that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources.  The paper must have been written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work.  Up to two awards are given each year and winners receive $500.

The winners for 2014 are:

Giuliana Alfinito for her paper “Understanding the Tito-Stalin Split” (faculty supporter–Bill Smaldone)

Jenny Grauberger for her paper “The Fundamentals and Applications of the Argon Ion Laser.”  (faculty supporter–Chuck Williamson)

Congratulations to Guiliana and Jenny for their outstanding work!