Willamette University May Weekend Collection

may-pole-danceWillamette University’s first May Day celebration took place in 1909. In the early years, campus literary societies elected and coronated a King and Queen of festivities, participated in intramural athletic competitions, and welcomed alumni back to campus. By the early 1930s the May Court no longer elected a King and consisted of a May Queen and her Attendants. As literary societies were largely defunct by this time, sororities played a much larger role in the voting for Queen.may-day-dinner

In 1970 several of the regular events attached to May Day, or Spring Weekend as it was later called, were dropped due to lack of interest. This included the election of the Spring Weekend court. Willamette then chose to emphasize the academic instead of the social facet of campus life. The event changed shape to become primarily a preview-day for prospective students.

The Willamette University May Weekend collection contains photographs, newspaper clippings, and event programs related to the university’s celebration of May Day. Some of the scenes of May Day depicted include the winding of the May pole, coronation of the May King and Queen, and group dances. Newspaper articles detail the merit of the 1956 May Queen and court. Programs outline the events of the weekend, including activities such as tug-of-war over the mill stream, and theatrical performances.

Originally written by Christopher McFetridge.  View more photos and documents at:

http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4902

 

may-day-court

 


Deadline for $500 MOHL Awards

The MOHL Research Award, sponsored by the Hatfield Library, is awarded for an excellent paper in any subject that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources. Up to two $500 cash prizes may be awarded. Any student paper written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work is eligible to be considered for this award. The paper should have been written in the current academic year, that is, fall 2014/spring 2015.

Note: papers done as a senior project but in the junior year are excluded.

Deadline: all paperwork must be in by the last day of finals, May 13, 2015 at 5:00 p.m.

Details at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/award/


Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

During finals week, the Hatfield Library is open extra hours to help students studying for finals exams. Don’t forget our new printer in the 24-hour Fish Bowl.  A reference librarian is available for research help until 5 p.m., and we will begin putting out cookies and coffee the first night before Finals until they run out after 10 p.m. if you need a brain food break!

Here are the hours:

  • Fri, May 1: 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
  • Sat, May 2: 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
  • Sun, May 3: 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 4: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 5: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 6: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Thurs, May 7: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Fri, May 8: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sat, May 9: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sun, May 10: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 11: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 12: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 13: 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Thur, May 14: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri, May 15:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat, May 16:  Noon – 4 p.m.
  • Sun, May 17:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Mon, May 18:  Summer Schedule begins: Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  CLOSED Saturday, Sunday and holidays.

Faculty Works Display, Spring 2015

The Hatfield Library will have a large selection of faculty works on display on the first floor of the library from April 1st through May 18th (after graduation).  The collection ranges from models of theatre productions to selections of scholarly research articles and books written by Willamette faculty.  Please feel free to read the articles written by our faculty.  Below are some photos of this year’s exhibit.

 

faculty-11Willamette “Faculty at Work”
faculty-1Chris Smith – Biology Department
faculty-12Selected Faculty Works on Display
faculty-2Emma Coddington – Biology Department
faculty-13Articles by Willamette Faculty
faculty-3Courtney Stevens – Psychology Department
faculty-14 Prints by Art Faculty
faculty-4James Thompson – Art Department
faculty-15 Photos of Theatre Productions
faculty-5Ellen Eisenberg – History Department
faculty-16 Model Design of Theatre Stages
faculty-6Juwen Zhang – Chinese Studies
faculty-17Artistic pieces by Art Faculty
faculty-8Karen Holman – Chemistry Department
faculty-18Sculpture by Art Faculty
faculty-9Alexandra Opie – Art Department
faculty-19 Book publication with Excerpts
faculty-10Bill Smaldone – History Department

2015 Edible Book Festival Results

Fourth Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our fourth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 11th, 2015, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners!!!  Karen Wilkens, Grace Pochis, Robert Minato, Carol Drost, and Elaine Goff.  It was fun to see these artistic-flavored literary inspirations.  What a delicious way to spend an afternoon.  Congratulations to our five winners!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event.

 

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
e14 “Humpty Dumpty”

Created by
Karen Wilkens
Inspired by
William Wallace Denslow’s
“Humpty Dumpty”
People’s Choice
e3 “The Most Delicious Trojan War

Created by
Grace Pochis
Inspired by
Homer’s
“The Illiad”
Best Student Entry
e11 A Confederacy of Lunches

Created by
Robert Minato
Inspired by
John Kennedy Toole’s
“A Confederacy of Dunces”
Most Creative
e5 Ketchup in the Rye

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
J.D. Salinger’s
“A Catcher in the Rye”
Most Literary
e18-3 “The Maize Runner

Created by
Elaine Goff
Inspired by
James Dashner’s
“The Maze Runner”
Punniest

 

Other Entries …………………………….. ……………………………..
e1 “Hairy Pot and the Deathly Marshmallows”

Created by
Lucas Rigsby
Inspired by
J. K. Rowling’s
“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”
e2 “Hamlet”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
William Shakespeare’s
“Hamlet”
e4 “The Salad of the Bad Cafe”

Created by
Erica Miller
Inspired by
Carson McCullers’
“The Ballad of the Sad Cafe”
e6 “The Lorax”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Dr. Seuss’
“The Lorax”
e7 “The Tender’s Shame”

Created by
Kelly Slaughter
Inspired by
Orson Scott Card’s
“Ender’s Game”
e8 “Cats in Jam or Kids”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Rudolph Dirks’s
“Katzenjammer Kids”
e9 “5280 Feet”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Stephen King’s
“The Green Mile”
e10 “50 Shades of Grey(tings)”

Created by
Anonymous
Inspired by
E L James
“50 Shareds of Grey”
e12-2 “Against: the Grains”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Mark Hatfield’s
“Against the Grain”
 e13 “Fish in Thyme”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
Laurel Bradley‘s
“A Wish in Time”
e15 “The Candy Shop Wars”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Brandon Mull’s
“The Candy Shop Wars”
e16 “A Tail of Two Kitties”

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Charles Dickens’s
“A Tail of Two Cities”
e17 “Ginger Pie”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Eleanor Estes’
“Ginger Pye”
e19 “50 Shades of Earl Grey”

Created by
Bev Ecklund
Inspired by
E.L. James’
“50 Shades of Grey”
e20 “The Great Catsby”

Created by
Georgia Mayfield
Inspired by
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s
“The Great Gatsby”
e21 “Twelve Inches of Paradise”

Created by
Emma Jones
Inspired by
John Kennedy Toole’s
“A Confederacy of Dunces”
  Additional Photos
carol-drost

Carol Drost

Most Literacy Award

 hamlet “Hamlet”
karen-wilkens Karen Wilkens

People’s Choice Award

candyshop-wars “Candy Shop Wars”
grace-pochis Grace Pochis

Best Student Entry Award

judges-decision Judges Decisions:
Mike Chasar (English), Karen Wood (University Chaplain), and Kaitlen McPherson (CLA student)
robert-minato Robert Minato

Most Creative Award

judges-decision2 Anticipating the Results
elaine-goff

Elaine Goff

Punniest Award

tail-of-two-cats “A Tail of Two Kitties”
great-catsby “The Great Catsby” voting Reviewing the entries before casting a vote for the People’s Choice Award
cats-in-jam-or-kids “Cats in Jam or Kids” buffet Buffet of Entries

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 2014, 2013, and 2012.


The Rex Amos Papers in the Willamette Archives

4099
Photo by Pete Beattie

Collage artist Rex Amos was born on August 13, 1935 in Wallace, Idaho to Frenche Harland “Bud” Amos and Jean (Johnstone) Amos. Amos was raised in Burke, Idaho, moving with his parents and brother, Clinton, to Portland, Oregon around the age of seven. Amos graduated from Washington High School in 1953 and was drafted into the U.S. Army shortly thereafter. Having grown up near Mt. Hood, Amos’s first choice would have been to be on the Army ski patrol, but instead he served as a machine gunner in the infantry from 1954 to 1956 because of his excellent marksmanship. Upon Amos’s return from the Army, his father made two attempts on Amos’s life. These assaults by his father continued a pattern of abuse, which had been prevalent throughout Amos’s childhood. To break the cycle of violence that had been visited upon the family, Amos moved his mother to a flat in Southeast Portland. It was there he met his future wife, Diane Smith.

In around 1960 Amos, Diane, and his mother Jean moved to The Village, a neighborhood in Southwest Portland full of musicians, writers, and artists. There Amos’s creativity blossomed. A jazz drummer at this time, he broke the world record for marathon drumming, playing for 82 hours. When the musicians union revoked his union card for playing this unsanctioned job, Amos moved to Big Sur, California, with friend Ron Marcus. He and Marcus worked at the Big Sur Inn and lived in a shack under a bridge. It was there Amos found his passion for creating art. Having little money for supplies, Amos began creating assemblages from materials he found in the area. At the time, Amos considered his work more an expression of political and social critique than an aesthetic creation.

Prior to this, Amos had begun studying at Portland State University (PSU) majoring in philosophy and literature and was awarded his B. S. in 1969. In the midst of his study, he befriended PSU philosophy professor Dr. Graham P. Conroy. While a student, Amos conceived and named the philosophy of Preliminism in the early 1960s. He then gave Preliminism to Conroy because Conroy deemed the giving of philosophy impossible.

After moving to a large house behind a dry cleaners on S. W. 11th and Montgomery near Portland State, Amos was able to obtain a dump license which made it possible for him to collect materials for assemblages. On a trip to New York City with friend Greg Stone in 1961, Amos visited the Museum of Modern Art and saw “The Art of Assemblage” exhibit where he was amazed to discover that he had been creating works similar to those on display.

When the city stopped issuing dump licenses, Amos turned to paper as a medium of expression. He gained much of his artistic training and inspiration through practice and by studying other artists. Meeting the painter Matt Glavin, who was teaching at UC Berkeley, transformed Amos’s vision. Glavin introduced him to the process of chine collé and made it possible for him to use the facilities at Magnolia Editions. Amos has continued to work in assemblage as well as in various forms of collage.

A signature of Amos’s collages are the images he uses, which are meticulously cut from published materials using scissors intended for eye surgery – a process that has earned him the moniker “The Cutter.” Amos then carefully selects from thousands of these images to create detailed collages infused with literary, historical, religious, and philosophical allusions. Amos’s collages have been featured in galleries and museums such as the Portland Art Museum, Magnolia Editions, the Corvallis Art Center, the 12×16 Gallery, and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Many of these are in the style of chine collé, which is a combination of collage and print-making techniques.

After more than 50 years in Portland, Amos and Diane, a retired secondary school English teacher, now live in Cannon Beach, Oregon. For more information on Amos, visit his website.


Content Description

The Rex Amos papers are a collection of artwork, journals and diaries, biographical material, correspondence, photographs, and writings compiled by Amos. The collection also contains an oral history interview conducted with Amos in 2014. A wealth of information about Amos’s life can be found in his correspondence and writings gathered largely from the mid-1950s to the 2010s. He documents his challenging childhood, his feelings about contemporary events, and the trials of friends and family’s diseases, deaths, and suicides. Amos’s oral history provides context to his papers and to his artwork. His correspondence reveals information about his own life as well as of the lives of those with whom he is writing, giving a unique look at life in Oregon and California through the second half of the twentieth century. There is video, newspaper, and Amos’s written documentation of his care for his mother, Jean, while she had Alzheimer’s disease. The Rex Amos papers represent Amos’s lifetime as an artist: as an extra in Paint Your Wagon; as a jazz drummer in Portland; as an assemblage artist of materials near his home in Big Sur, California; as a collage artist creating ‘gutterscapes’ from scraps of used paper; to a collage artist creating chine collé for art galleries and museums in Oregon and California.

These papers also represent Amos’s life as a philosopher. Amos conceived and named the philosophy of Preliminism, the theory and practice of practice. Preliminism is represented throughout Amos’s papers, mentioned in correspondence, in his writing and referenced in news articles related to his work. His papers also reflect his life as a fly fisherman, clammer, and overall outdoorsman.

Along with Amos’s own materials are those that he has gathered about friends and other Pacific Northwest artists. These include artwork, books, photographs, video, and writings of Amos’s family and many area artists. Amos’s wife, Diane, assisted in the organization and appraisal of the materials, adding context to much of the materials and many of the people featured in the papers. The Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University has a collection of Amos’s artwork.

This information was originally written by Ashley Toutain, Processing Archivist and Records Manager at the Mark O. Hatfield Library for the Rex Amos papers collection. For additional info, visit:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4231

The source of the images below come from:
http://www.willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2012-13/amos_gallery/index.html#0

 

01 02 03 04

New to the Archives

page050We received a wonderful piece of Willamette History last month – a bag and memorabilia given to Alumni Relations from Marian Pope.
Marian entered Willamette University in 1932 living in Lausanne Hall. She meticulously calculated her every purchase into a notebook and saved each receipt. It is a wonderful look into the life of a Willamette freshman in 1932.

 

In addition to living in Lausanne, Marian was a member of the Daleth Teth Gimel Hebrew letter society. Daleth Teth Gimel, organized at Willamette in 1929, was Willamette’s first national social organization for undergraduate women. In 1939 the name was changed to Dalda Dau Gamma.

Come to the Archives to find other pieces of the Willamette student experience.

(Originally posted on Tuesday, February 17th, 2015 at 6:05 pm by on the archives blog).

Pope2
The Willamette Bearcat towers over campus on Marian’s bag.

Kelley Strawn Faculty Colloquium

strawnPlease join us Friday, February 27th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the third Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided to accompany this talk.

Kelley Strawn, Associate Professor of Sociology

What’s Behind All This ‘Nones’-Sense? – Examining Religious Non-Affiliation in the United States Over Time”

Abstract: In this talk, I will present the results of my recent research examining whether predictors – or “causes” – of religious non-affiliation in the United States have changed over the last forty years.  While the popular media and political “messagers” like to latch onto particular explanations for the rise of religious non-affiliation, evidence suggests that (a) it is very difficult  to characterize or predict who does or does not self-describe as “non-affiliated”; and (b) that those factors that do provide some degree of explanation have changed over time.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Dining with the Dead

You are invited to join the Center for Ancient Studies and Archaeology and the Salem Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, this coming Thursday, February 19 for DINING WITH THE DEAD New Discoveries in Early Byzantine Sicily.  For additional information, please go to DINING WITH THE DEAD.  This event is free and open to the public.
Please note the location for this event is the Hatfield Room of the Mark O. Hatfield Library at 7:30pm.
dining-with-the-dead

Ecological Restoration at Willamette University’s Zena Forest

arabasFriday February 13th Hatfield Room, 3-4pm

Karen Arabas

Title:  Ecological Restoration at Willamette University’s Zena Forest

Abstract:

Willamette University’s Zena Forest is part of the largest remaining contiguous block of forested land in the Eola Hills of the central Willamette Valley, where Euro-American agriculture, urban and forestry activities have reduced the area of original oak habitat significantly.  The long-term restoration goal at the property is to enhance the fundamentally interrelated and collective function of upland oak habitat at the watershed scale within the context of our conservation easement as well as our educational mission. To that end we initiated habitat restoration activities on 130 acres of upland oak woodland and prairie habitat in 2009.  As an educational institution with rich agency and community partnerships (ODFW, BPA, USFWS, NRCS, TMF and IAE, Salem-Keizer School District, The Forest Guild) we are in a unique position to undertake long-term data collection and analysis in permanent monitoring plots in our restoration units, as well as investigate drivers of landscape and habitat change at a variety of temporal and spatial scales.  In this talk I will discuss preliminary impacts of our restoration treatments.

Additionally, I will summarize the work of a number of Willamette University students, whose research at broader scales has advanced our understanding of past climate and human impacts on the landscape. The synthesis of our monitoring work and broader scale research, in conjunction with the expertise of our community partners, has significantly enhanced our restoration efforts and will help to guide our decision making in the future.