Fall Semester Hours

We will continue our shortened building hours throughout the week of August 22nd (8 am – 5 pm).  On Saturday we will be open 10-4pm, but closed all day Sunday.  Monday, August 29, the first day of class, our hours will extend to 8 am – Midnight.

Our full semester hours will begin Monday, August 5th (7:45 am – 2 am) weekdays, Saturdays (10 am – 9 pm), and Sundays (10 am – 2 am).

Details at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar/



(Image source: Pixabay.com)

Welcome (Back)

Welcome to the Mark O. Hatfield Library, for those who are new to our library.  And welcome back for those who are returning!  We are ready for your return, and hope you’re ready to come back.  As you probably already know, we have top notch librarians to help with your upcoming research, plus excellent tools and resources.

Here is a link to get to a page that will help orient you to our library, or refresh your knowledge.  (And for the record, several Pokemon have been found in and around the library!)

Faculty Colloquium: What I Learned in Prison

Dear Colleagues, buissm
Please join us this Friday, April 29th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our eleventh and final Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Melissa Buis Michaux, Associate Professor of Politics

Title: What I Learned in Prison

Abstract:  The United States currently incarcerates about 2.4 million men, women and children.  The number of incarcerated does not take into account how many people’s lives are touched by our extensive system of punishment, including those on parole or probation; children of incarcerated parents; and communities that support prison systems.  Furthermore, racial disparities in arrests, sentencing, and prison time call into question our guarantees of equal justice and fundamental fairness.  Inside the prison walls, many prisoners are subject to a system of control that prioritizes punishment over rehabilitation.  All of this I knew before I stepped inside a prison.  Come hear what I learned—about prison, the people behind the walls, and myself—once I went inside.  I will also be joined by some students from my “Reforming Criminal Justice” class that has been going inside the Oregon State Penitentiary this semester and working alongside prisoners.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.
Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

2016 Edible Book Festival Results

5th Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our fifth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on April 1st 2016, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners who each won a nifty mug:  Joni Roberts, Carol Drost, KayLyn Stirton and Yasmine Robles, Leslie Whitaker, and Dillon Peck.  The exhibits were all deliciously inspired!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event. Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 20152014, 2013, and 2012. For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
“Frosting the Doughman”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
“Frosty the Snowman”
06-mandarines “The Mandarins

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
Simone de Beauvoir’s
“The Mandarins”
Most Literary
16-war “War(heads)
and Peas”

Created by
Kaylyn Stirton &
Yasmine Robles
Inspired by
Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Best Student Entry
03-boys The Boys in
the Boat

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Daniel Brown’s
“The Boys in the Boat”
Most Creative
“The Mars-ipan”

Created by
Dillon Peck
Inspired by
Andy Weir’s
“The Martian”
People’s Choice


Other Entries ……………………………..
01-salt “The Salt in Our Stars”

Created by
Audrey Nieswandt
Inspired by
John Green’s
“The Fault in Our Stars”
04-remains “The Remains of the
Day(Night Donuts)”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Kazuo Ishiguro
“The Remains of the Day”
05-three-musketeers “Western Canon”

Created by
Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by
Alexandre Dumas’
“Western Literature:
Three Musketeers”
07-two-cities “It was the Best of Times,
It was the Wurst of Times”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Charles Dicken’s
“A Tale of Two Cities”
“The Good Earth”

Created by
Paul Meuse
Inspired by
Pearl S. Buck’s
“The Good Earth”
“And Then There
Were None”

Created by
Allison Johnson
Inspired by
Agatha Christie’s
“And Then There Were None”
“Like Water for Chocolate”

Created by
Allison Johnson
Inspired by
Laura Esquivel’s
“Like Water for Chocolate”
“Gone with the Wind: Remembrance of
Things Passed”

Created by
Al Furtwangler
Inspired by
Margaret Mitchell’s
“Remembrance of Things Past
and Gone with the Wind”
13-waldo “Pears Waldo”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
Martin Handford’s
“Where’s Waldo”
14-fish “A String in the Carp”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Nancy Bond’s
“A String in the Harp”
15-bread “Bride and Bread Juices”

Created by
Doreen Simonsen
Inspired by
Jane Austen’s
“Pride and Prejudice”
17-bottles “The Naked Lunch”

Created by
Jason Yelle
Inspired by
William S. Burroughs’
“The Naked Lunch”
18-walk “The Ones Who Walk
Away from the Omelets”

Created by
Inspired by
Ursula K. Le Guin’s
“The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”

Liquid Sky, Faculty Colloquium by Chuck Williamson


Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 1st at 3 pm. in the Kremer Board Room (FORD 102) for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Chuck Williamson, Professor of Chemistry

Title: Liquid Sky: Liquid-Liquid Mixtures, Light Scattering, and Critical Behavior

Abstract:  The romance of a bottle of wine and a technicolor sunset – perhaps the perfect pairing of a liquid-liquid mixture with light scattering phenomena. This talk will strive for a second-best pairing by showing how light scattering may be used to understand the physical properties of liquid-liquid mixtures. At first glance, pouring two nonreactive liquids together to make a mixture seems like a very simple physical process. Sometimes two liquids mix completely, like ethanol and water do in alcoholic beverages. Sometimes the liquids stay in two layers and do not mix very much at all, like oil and water. However, many pairs of liquids show both types of behavior: the liquids mix completely for some temperatures and some mixing ratios, but the liquids separate into two layers at other conditions. In this talk I will discuss the laser light scattering method we use to make maps of the exact conditions in which two liquids mix to form a single layer, or phase. I will introduce special points on the maps called critical points, and show the universal and beautiful physical behavior that all liquid-liquid mixtures exhibit at a critical point, like critical opalescence and spinodal decomposition. I will also present a new type of fundamental liquid-liquid phase behavior my students and I have observed here at Willamette. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the complex ways in which light can scatter from a liquid-liquid mixture by incorporating examples of light scattering found in the atmosphere, such as the whiteness of clouds and fog, the blueness of the sky, and solar halos. There is also a brief shout out to Edvard Munch.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Lausanne Hall Through the Years

Many students have lived in Lausanne Hall throughout the years, and in celebration of this landmark campus building we have a display with numerous photos and historical descriptions.  Below are some of the photos and description plates about Lausanne Hall which will be on display until May 15th.

l2Throughout Lausanne Hall’s History, she has had many names Woman’s College, Women’s College, Lausanne Hall, and the U.S.S. Lausanne.  And the name Lausanne has been used for three different buildings.

There are some fun quotes highlighting life in Lausanne Hall, such as from the Willamette Collegian, November 11, 1909: “No more fear from fire at the Hall now.  We have a new chemical fire extinguisher and a chain-ladder fire escape. ”  Then a week later in the Collegian, “Lausanne Hall was saved from destruction by fire last Saturday by gallant efforts of Messrs. Oakes, Anderson and Booth.  As is the case with boys, they visited the kitchen afterwards.”


In 1918, the old Lausanne Hall was condemned, and a song was made about its languishing condition: “There’s an old historic building, Fames in story and in song. Where the Westland’s fairest daughters Linger: may they linger long.  Old Lausanne may not look splendid, Its appearance don’t deride, it is some majestic ruin, When you view it from the inside.  (Second Chorus) Through insurance underwriters Think its fire risk is too great To Protect it by insurance. Yet it’s here we want to state Thought they call it an “Old Firetrap…”

In October of 1919, the old Lausanne Hall was razed by the Willamette “boys” and finished by professional workmen.  The old Music Building at Willamette was remodeled and temporarily used for housing for the young women at Willamette while the new home was being built.


As World War II rolled around, in December of 1942 the Board of Trustees approved a plan to offer Lausanne Hall as a men’s dormitory in the event Willamette was selected as a site for a Navy or Army training unit for World War II.  In April, 1943, Willamette was selected as a site to offer the V-12 naval program and plans are made to house 150 men in Lausanne, and a few months later in July 270 men reported to Willamette University’s naval headquarters (Gatke Hall). In October 1945, the V-12 Navy program comes to an end.


Edible Book Festival, April 1st

Do you like food? Books? How about edible books? The library is hosting its fifth annual Edible Book Festival in the Hatfield Room on April 1st, and you are invited to participate!

“War and Peas” by Alice French

“War and Peas” by Alice French

An edible book is a dish inspired by any book, whether your inspiration be the title, the characters in it, plot points, or really anything. The only limits on your creation are that it must be made of mostly food and must be inspired by a book of some kind. We’ll have an example on display in the library soon, or you can check here for examples and inspiration to get your creativity flowing!

If you find yourself with a brilliant idea, bring your edible book to the Hatfield Room between 8:00am and 1:00pm on April 1st. We are excited to see more of your wonderful creations this year!

Drop off entries by 1pm in the Hatfield Room.

8-1pm and 2-4:30pm – Public voting & viewing times

1-2pm – Judging panel votes

4:30pm – Awards ceremony & light refreshments

Prizes will be awarded for the People’s Choice, the Most Literary, the Most Creative, the Punniest, and the Best Student Entry.

Please contact Carol Drost for any questions at cdrost@willamette.edu (503-370-6715).  The following link opens a PDF poster which contains all of the details of the upcoming event: ediblebooks-poster.pdf


Faculty Colloquium by Cecily McCaffrey

cecily-mccaffreyDear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, March 4th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our fifth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Cecily McCaffrey, Associate Professor of History

Title: Wang Sanhuai and the Jiaqing Emperor: A Study in Political Dialogue

Wang Sanhuai was a prominent rebel leader of the White Lotus Uprisings (1796-1804) in Sichuan province, China. Wang and his band resisted state authority and evaded arrest for two years. During that time, Wang and his fellows made a mockery of imperial policies of pacification that rewarded loyal subjects: for example, in an episode recounted in the Qing shi gao, Wang petitioned for surrender as a ploy to facilitate an ambush against Qing military forces. However, when he was finally captured, Wang played the role of penitent, claiming that he had wished to surrender all along. This talk examines Wang’s depositions and official reports of his conduct as evidence of non-elite political maneuvering. When read against the grain of court rhetoric, Wang’s testimony and actions suggest not only that he had a perspicacious command of imperial policy but also that he attempted to engage officers of the court on their own terms as he negotiated for his life. Although Wang did not survive, his arguments were not without effect: references to Wang’s testimony surface in the Jiaqing emperor’s edicts discussing the evolution of state pacification policies in the months following Wang’s arrest. Taking Wang Sanhuai as one example, this talk argues for increased recognition of the role and influence of non-elite subjects in the constitution and evolution of the state-society relationship in Qing China.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Sarah Sentilles and Rick Barot Readings

Please join us for the second event of the Spring 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University: a reading by Sarah Sentilles and Rick Barot, on Wednesday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. The event is free and open to the public, and books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.


Sarah Sentilles is a nonfiction writer, scholar of religion, critical theorist, and author of three books, including her recent memoir Breaking Up with God: A Love Story. She earned a bachelor’s degree at Yale and master’s and doctoral degrees at Harvard. At the core of her scholarship, writing, and activism is a commitment to investigating the roles language, images, and practices play in oppression, violence, social transformation, and justice movements. She is currently the Mark and Melody Teppola Presidential Distinguished Visiting Professor at Willamette University, teaching courses in religious studies, art, and creative writing. In 2016-17, she will be Chair of the MA in Critical Theory + Creative Research at Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland. She is currently working on a book about art and war titled Draw Your Weapons.


Poet Rick Barot is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently Chord (2015), currently a finalist for the PEN Open Book Award for best book of the year by a writer of color. Born in the Philippines and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, he attended Wesleyan University, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and Stanford University, where he was a Stegner Fellow in Poetry and later a Jones Lecturer in Poetry. Barot’s first collection of poetry, The Darker Fall(2002), received the Kathryn A. Morton Prize in Poetry. His second collection, Want(2008), was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Awards and won the 2009 Grub Street Book Prize. His poems and essays have appeared in the New RepublicPoetry, the Kenyon Review, the Virginia Quarterly Review, and others. The recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, Barot has taught at numerous universities including Stanford, California College of the Arts, George Washington University, and Lynchburg College. He currently resides in Tacoma, Washington, and teaches at Pacific Lutheran University.


Read an interview with Sarah here: http://religiondispatches.org/ibreaking-up-with-godi-i-didnt-lose-my-faith-i-left-it/

And read Rick’s poem “Tarp” here: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poem/245802

Scott Nadelson

Featuring Craig Milberg

Craig Milberg joined Willamette University on January 4th, 2016, as the new University Librarian at Willamette University. Before joining Willamette, Craig was Assistant Director for Discovery Systems at Davidson College in North Carolina from 2009 to 2015.  A native New Yorker, Craig also worked on Wall Street as a librarian, project manager and IT manager. Before that, Craig was employed as a chemist making radioactive analogs of potential medicines for drug trials, a job that made it necessary for him to have his radioactivity levels checked on a weekly basis.

Craig is married with two young sons and a grown daughter. In his free time he enjoys hiking, nature photography, rose gardening, reef keeping and taking care of his two dogs, one of whom is one of the rarest breeds in the US, a Canaan Dog. In addition to learning the ins and outs of Willamette he is looking forward to exploring the areas many waterfalls with his sons and dogs.

Please welcome Craig the next time you see him!

Craig Milberg University Librarian

Craig Milberg University Librarian