Popular Reading Collection Suggestions

If you’re going away for Thanksgiving or staying close to campus, why not grab a great book from our Popular Reading Collection which is near the elevator. Here are just a few of the over 350 titles we have to consider:

The lord of Opium
Nancy Farmer, PZ7.F23814 Lor 2013
In 2137, fourteen-year-old Matt is stunned to learn that, as the clone of El Patrón, he is expected to take over as leader of the corrupt drug empire of Opium, where there is also a hidden cure for the ecological devastation faced by the rest of the world.

Eat to live cookbook: 200 delicious nutrient-rich recipes for fast and sustained weight loss, reversing disease, and lifelong health
Joel Fuhrman, RM222.2 .F8395 2013
Filled with nutritious, delicious, and easy-to-prepare recipes for every occasion, the Eat to Live Cookbook shows you how to follow Dr. Fuhrman’s life-changing program as you eat your way to incredible health.

Code name Verity
Elizabeth Wein. PZ7.W4358 Cp 2012
In 1943, a British fighter plane crashes in Nazi-occupied France and the survivor tells a tale of friendship, war, espionage, and great courage as she relates what she must to survive while keeping secret all that she can

The brides of Rollrock Island
Margo Lanagan, PZ7.L216 Br 2012
On remote Rollrock Island, men go to sea to make their livings–and to catch their wives. The witch Misskaella knows the way of drawing a girl from the heart of a seal, of luring the beauty out of the beast. And for a price a man may buy himself a lovely sea-wife. He may have and hold and keep her. And he will tell himself that he is her master. But from his first look into those wide, questioning, liquid eyes, he will be just as transformed as she. He will be equally ensnared. And the witch will have her true payment.

Raina Telgemeier Gurihiru, PN6727.T294 D73 2012
Callie rides an emotional roller coaster while serving on the stage crew for a middle school production of Moon over Mississippi as various relationships start and end, and others never quite get going

Spontaneous Happiness
Andrew Weil, RA790 .W45 2011
In just eight weeks you will learn to influence your mood through natural, healthy means; improve your physical and mental health; discover how to sleep better; connect with others; and achieve balance and serenity.

Silver : return to Treasure Island
Andrew Motion, PR6063.O842 S55 2012b
It’s almost forty years after the events of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island:  Jim Hawkins now runs an inn called the Hispaniola on the English coast with his son, Jim, and Long John Silver has returned to England to live in obscurity with his daughter, Natty. Their lives are quiet and unremarkable; their adventures have seemingly ended.
But for Jim and Natty, the adventure is just beginning. One night, Natty approaches young Jim with a proposition: return to Treasure Island and find the remaining treasure that their fathers left behind so many years before. As Jim and Natty set sail in their fathers’ footsteps, they quickly learn that this journey will not be easy.  Immediately, they come up against murderous pirates, long-held grudges, and greed and deception lurking in every corner.

The Dog Stars (Vintage Contemporaries)
Peter Heller, PS3608.E454 D64 2012
Hig somehow survived the flu pandemic that killed everyone he knows. Now his wife is gone, his friends are dead, and he lives in the hangar of a small abandoned airport with his dog, Jasper, and a mercurial, gun-toting misanthrope named Bangley.

But when a random transmission beams through the radio of his 1956 Cessna, the voice ignites a hope deep inside him that a better life exists outside their tightly controlled perimeter. Risking everything, he flies past his point of no return and follows its static-broken trail, only to find something that is both better and worse than anything he could ever hope for.


For more great titles, search the library home page (the online catalog) for “popular reading” in quotes.



Faculty Colloquium: Willamette University and Debate in the People’s Republic of China


Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, November 13th at 3:00 in the Hatfield Room for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Robert Trapp, Professor of Civic Communication and Media, Director of Debate Union

Title:  Willamette University and Debate in the People’s Republic of China
Abstract: For the better part of two decades I have worked to teach debate in the emerging democracies of Central and Eastern Europe and even more closed societies like the People’s Republic of China. All of the programs with which I worked were funded by George Soros and the Open Society Foundation (OSF). Then in 2007, after a decade of working in Central and Eastern Europe, I had the opportunity to direct the instruction of students, teachers, and judges at the FLTRP (Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press) Cup in Beijing, which had the reputation of being the most prestigious English-speaking debate competition in China. I continued to direct the instruction for the FLTRP cup for four more years. Then I applied for a series of small grants from OSF to host instructional workshops for students, teachers, and judges.  In 2012, I applied successfully for an OSF grant of $3,000,000 to create a “sustainable debate program” across many geographic areas in China. The 3-year grant was fully approved.

Debating in China prior to our program was expressly for the purpose of using debate to teach oral English. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the program that we are in the process of completing; its goals and structure as well as the depth and breadth of the program that by all appearances has changed the face of debate in the People’s Republic of China in positive ways.

As always, please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Faculty Colloquium, Environmental Health


Please join us this Friday, October 30th at 3:00 in the Hatfield Room for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Joyce Millen, Associate Professor of Anthropology
Barbara Stebbins-Boaz, Associate Professor of Biology
Title: Environmental Health Research Collaborative Takes Flight on a LARC

Abstract: Environmental health is concerned with the air we breathe, the water we drink, the soil upon which we grow crops, the food we consume, and the products we use on our bodies, in our homes, and at work. It is both a discipline and a social movement that aims to promote human health and wellbeing. Effective environmental health research—and activism—requires knowledge of myriad intersections between nonhuman and human organisms, and natural and built environments. In this colloquium, we will introduce our ongoing exploration of environmental health work, in the lab, on the road, and in the classroom. We will present highlights from our LARC summer research collaborative which took us up and down the Willamette Valley, visiting relevant agencies and laboratories and closely investigating local environmental health concerns, including pesticide use in parks and agricultural fields, diesel fuel use, BPAs in food and water containers, toxins in daycare settings, the osteosarcoma outbreak in West Salem, and neurotoxins used in dry cleaning. We will also share ways in which we have integrated environmental health themes in our courses and how we envision expanding Willamette’s contribution to this work.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

An Uncanny Evening

Please join us for the second event in the Fall 2015 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette: “An Uncanny Evening,” a performance of stories from The Uncanny Reader, edited by Marjorie Sandor, on Wednesday, October 28. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.

The Uncanny Reader is the first anthology of its kind to focus on the literary uncanny, “from the deeply unnerving to the possibly supernatural,” with stories by writers as various as Edgar Allan Poe, Shirley Jackson, and Karen Russell, as well as stories by lesser known writers from around the world. What the stories share is “an increasingly unstable sense of self, home, and planet.”

Marjorie Sandor is the author of four books, most recently The Late Interiors: A Life Under Construction. Her story collection Portrait of My Mother, Who Posed Nude in Wartime, won the 2004 National Jewish Book Award in Fiction, and an essay collection, The Night Gardener: A Search for Home, won the 2000 Oregon Book Award for literary nonfiction. She is a professor of creative writing at Oregon State University.

She will be joined this evening by a troupe of musicians and actors who will perform excerpts from several stories, complete with eerie music, talking dolls, and visits from Sigmund Freud. Perfect preparation for Halloween.

Watch a trailer for The Uncanny Reader here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H84Bhp2r1gQ

Banned Books 2015

banned-bks-2015Banned Books Week for 2015 is held Sept 27-Oct 3. Celebrate your freedom to read by reading a book from our Banned Books display, which will be on display from Sept 25th throughout October on the first floor of the library.  We encourage you to check them out!

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read.  It highlights the value of free and open access to information, and brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.


Over this past decade, 5,099 challenges were reported to the Office for Intellectual Freedom. These are the top five reasons…

1,577 challenges due to “sexually explicit” material
1,291 challenges due to “offensive language”
989 challenges due to materials deemed “unsuited to age group”
619 challenged due to “violence”‘
361 challenges due to “homosexuality”
(Source: http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10)



The top ten most frequently challenged books last year include:

1)      The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie

Reasons: anti-family, cultural insensitivity, drugs/alcohol/smoking, gambling, offensive language, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group, violence. Additional reasons: “depictions of bullying”

2)      Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

Reasons: gambling, offensive language, political viewpoint. Additional reasons: “politically, racially, and socially offensive,” “graphic depictions”

3)      And Tango Makes Three, Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell

Reasons: Anti-family, homosexuality, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “promotes the homosexual agenda”

4)      The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison

Reasons: Sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “contains controversial issues”

5)      It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris

Reasons: Nudity, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group. Additional reasons: “alleges it child pornography”

6)      Saga, by Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples

Reasons: Anti-Family, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group. Additional reasons:

7)      The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited to age group, violence

8)      The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “date rape and masturbation”

9)      A Stolen Life, Jaycee Dugard

Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group

10)  Drama, by Raina Telgemeier

Reasons: sexually explicit


For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week visit the ALA Banned Books web site:


Source: ALA Banned Books web site

Alumni Weekend, 2015

This is Alumni Weekend at Willamette, and the Hatfield Library has two activities lined up for you!

9:30-10:30am, Hatfield Room (2nd Floor)

Get a behind-the-scenes tour through the Hatfield Library and Archives. See our Digital Productions Lab, Archives, and Book Repair center. Explore some of the Archive’s digital collections and maybe even dig up something from your Willamette days.

10:30-11:30am, Hatfield Room (2nd Floor)

Curious to know how Willamette’s campus evolved from a single building in a field to the beautiful setting we appreciate today? Come hear public historian Dr. William F. Willingham ’66 as he shares information that he has accumulated while researching Willamette’s architectural and natural landscape for his forthcoming book on the subject.

3-4:30pm, Hatfield Room (2nd Floor)

There will be a panel discussion on the Fulbright Program in the Hatfield Room from 3-4:30 p.m.  Jim Nafziger will be the moderator, and several CLA faculty will talk about their Fulbright experiences: Bobby Brewer-Wallin (Silk Road, China), Jeanne Clark (Jordan), Ron Loftus (Japan), Elliot Maltz (The Philippines), Pamela Moro (Thailand), Scott Pike (Greece), and Xijuan Zhou (Silk Road, China).


Details at: http://www.willamette.edu/alumni/alumni_weekend/schedule/index.html


Introducing Paul Meuse


Introducing Paul Meuse, our new Political Papers Archivist at the Mark O. Hatfield Library.  Paul is a Willamette grad, BA in Politics, and served as an archival assistant while he was a student, and also worked in our library’s Digital Production Lab during the summer after graduating.

After teaching in Japan from 2008-2010, Paul returned to Oregon and received his Masters in Public Policy from Oregon State University in 2013. Paul served as campaign manager for Bill Dalton, candidate for State Rep, House District 19, in 2014, and most recently has been employed as a legislative research assistant for the City of Portland.  His processing experience includes working with the papers of Senator Mark Hatfield (while an undergraduate at WU) and with Governor Ted Kulongoski’s papers (while completing his MPP) at the Oregon State Archives.

Paul brings solid processing experience and a comprehensive understanding of political processes.  He will help implement the processing of Senator Packwood’s congressional papers.  We hope you welcome Paul when you see him!

Katriniana Exhibit

Ten years ago Hurricane Katrina slammed into Louisiana, and causing the New Orleans’ levees to fail.  It forced hundreds of thousands from their homes and left 80 percent of the city under water.

Doreen Simonsen, Humanities and Fine Arts Librarian at Willamette, has put on display an outstanding exhibit of literary and artistic responses to Hurricane Katrina on the 2nd floor of the library.  It is a selection of various genres that range from children’s literature, art exhibitions, fiction, music, and film.  The exhibit is her personal collection and will be on display until Sept. 23rd, and also includes some rare materials.  Make sure to view it before it comes down!

Below are some photos taken of this exhibit.




Announcing Deborah Dancik’s Retirement


Deborah Dancik, University Librarian for the Mark O. Hatfield Library and Associate VP of Academic Affairs, will be retiring as of August 31, 2015.  She has served Willamette University for ten years, in addition to many regional and national committees.  She will be missed by her colleagues at Willamette and beyond, and especially by the staff at our library.  We’ll miss you Deb!


Dean Marlene Moore wrote the following…

After ten years of leadership and exemplary service to Willamette University, Deborah Dancik is retiring effective Aug. 31, 2015. While she credits the efforts, talents and goodwill of others for the many things she has accomplished, her leadership is the common factor that has resulted in so much progress.

The library has expanded and improved services during her years as university librarian. Their technologic initiatives have resulted in the creation and publication of large digital collections, the development of the university’s institutional repository, the implementation of a digital production lab, and technological support for units like the Hallie Ford Museum of Art.

Willamette University has been a leader in the Orbis Cascade Alliance in ways that improved our access to information, gained efficiencies on library operations, and leveraged our collection and technology dollars. We now have a well-developed archival program that supports the curriculum, serves as a draw for alumni, and houses regionally significant collections.

Two years ago, she took on the associate vice president of academic affairs portfolio and has provided support for the academic support units. In this role, she helped directors launch new ideas, solve problems, and better integrate with other campus units. She oversaw the creation of the Sustainability Institute and the Native American Program, hiring directors for both of those new units. She directed a comprehensive review of Willamette Academy that provides guidance for building on its strength and potential.

We will formally celebrate her accomplishments and wish her well on the next stage of her journey in August. In the meantime, please join me in thanking her for her administrative skills, multiple accomplishments, and dedication to improving Willamette University. It has been a pleasure to work with her on so many projects. She will be missed.

Welcome New Students!

We want to give our new students a big welcome to Willamette and the Hatfield Library!


As you’ll discover, the Hatfield Library is a treasured gem on campus.  It is centrally located on campus, and it is a popular place to hangout for group study sessions on the first floor and also for quiet study times on the quiet second floor.

Starting August 31st, the library will be open regularly throughout the school year from 7:45 a.m. to 2 a.m. Monday through Thursday, and closes early on Fridays at 9 p.m.  During the weekends, the building is open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 2 a.m. on Sundays.  The building is officially closed to the general public at 9 p.m. every night.  To view our current calendar, click here.

We also offer help with your research through individual consultations with librarians (set up an appointment here), online chat, and in-person help at the reference desk in the library (M-Th 10 a.m-9 p.m., Fri 10-4 p.m., Sun 3-5, 6-9 p.m.).  The hours for our Archives and Special Collections are 9 -12 p.m., 1-4 p.m.

To learn about some of the most essential services and resources we offer, visit our Welcome Students Page.  We’re really excited about the new academic year, and our staff are all looking forward to working with you!

Welcome to Willamette!