2015 EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL

The Mark O. Hatfield Library invites you to participate in the fourth annual EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!

Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Hatfield Room.edible-books-2015

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

Some of last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle Public Library and Duke University, or check out flickr. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Free to enter– no registration required. Drop off your entry in the Hatfield Room on March 11 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book until 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

All entries will be on display from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Even if you don’t enter, you can cast a vote for your favorite edible book. At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges– Mike Chasar (English), Karen Wood (University Chaplain), and Kaitlen McPherson (CLA student) — will announce the prizes for:

Best Student Entry

Most Literary

Most Creative

Punniest

People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners. To view all photos of last year’s entries, go to:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2014/03/20/edible-book-festival-results-2014/

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu

Last year’s winners:

Award Winners
war-and-peas2 “War and Peas”

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
People’s Choice
pitcher-dory-gray “Pitcher of Dory in Gray

Created by Emily Wetherford
Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s
Portrait of Dorian Gray”
Best Student Entry
dune He Who Controls the
Spice Controls the Universe

Created by Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by Frank Herbert’s
“Dune”
Most Creative
war-and-peas War and Peas

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Most Literary
wholey-bible2 The Hole-y Bible

Created by Anna Corner
Inspired by “The Holy Bible”
Punniest

New to the Archives

page050We received a wonderful piece of Willamette History this month – a bag and memorabilia given to Alumni Relations from Marian Pope.
Marian entered Willamette University in 1932 living in Lausanne Hall. She meticulously calculated her every purchase into a notebook and saved each receipt. It is a wonderful look into the life of a Willamette freshman in 1932.

 

In addition to living in Lausanne, Marian was a member of the Daleth Teth Gimel Hebrew letter society. Daleth Teth Gimel, organized at Willamette in 1929, was Willamette’s first national social organization for undergraduate women. In 1939 the name was changed to Dalda Dau Gamma.

Come to the Archives to find other pieces of the Willamette student experience.

(Originally posted on Tuesday, February 17th, 2015 at 6:05 pm by on the archives blog).

Pope2
The Willamette Bearcat towers over campus on Marian’s bag.

Kelley Strawn Faculty Colloquium

strawnPlease join us Friday, February 27th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the third Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided to accompany this talk.

Kelley Strawn, Associate Professor of Sociology

What’s Behind All This ‘Nones’-Sense? – Examining Religious Non-Affiliation in the United States Over Time”

Abstract: In this talk, I will present the results of my recent research examining whether predictors – or “causes” – of religious non-affiliation in the United States have changed over the last forty years.  While the popular media and political “messagers” like to latch onto particular explanations for the rise of religious non-affiliation, evidence suggests that (a) it is very difficult  to characterize or predict who does or does not self-describe as “non-affiliated”; and (b) that those factors that do provide some degree of explanation have changed over time.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Dining with the Dead

You are invited to join the Center for Ancient Studies and Archaeology and the Salem Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, this coming Thursday, February 19 for DINING WITH THE DEAD New Discoveries in Early Byzantine Sicily.  For additional information, please go to DINING WITH THE DEAD.  This event is free and open to the public.
Please note the location for this event is the Hatfield Room of the Mark O. Hatfield Library at 7:30pm.
dining-with-the-dead

Ecological Restoration at Willamette University’s Zena Forest

arabasFriday February 13th Hatfield Room, 3-4pm

Karen Arabas

Title:  Ecological Restoration at Willamette University’s Zena Forest

Abstract:

Willamette University’s Zena Forest is part of the largest remaining contiguous block of forested land in the Eola Hills of the central Willamette Valley, where Euro-American agriculture, urban and forestry activities have reduced the area of original oak habitat significantly.  The long-term restoration goal at the property is to enhance the fundamentally interrelated and collective function of upland oak habitat at the watershed scale within the context of our conservation easement as well as our educational mission. To that end we initiated habitat restoration activities on 130 acres of upland oak woodland and prairie habitat in 2009.  As an educational institution with rich agency and community partnerships (ODFW, BPA, USFWS, NRCS, TMF and IAE, Salem-Keizer School District, The Forest Guild) we are in a unique position to undertake long-term data collection and analysis in permanent monitoring plots in our restoration units, as well as investigate drivers of landscape and habitat change at a variety of temporal and spatial scales.  In this talk I will discuss preliminary impacts of our restoration treatments.

Additionally, I will summarize the work of a number of Willamette University students, whose research at broader scales has advanced our understanding of past climate and human impacts on the landscape. The synthesis of our monitoring work and broader scale research, in conjunction with the expertise of our community partners, has significantly enhanced our restoration efforts and will help to guide our decision making in the future.


Celebrate African American History Month

February is African American History Month and the Hatfield Library has created a display of books, films, and sound recordings in celebration. In 1976 when President Gerald R. Ford declared February to be African American History Month, he encouraged all Americans to seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” So come take a look at this interesting exhibit on the first floor of the library; all of the items are available for checkout!


Student Publications Collection

student-publications-collThe Willamette University Archives has recently released a new collection called the Student Publications collection.  The Student Publications collection includes literary publications, magazines, newsletters, and newspapers created by Willamette University student organizations and groups. Included are the long-running school newspaper The Collegian; the student yearbook, The Wallulah; the Tokyo International University of America yearbook; literary journals; and comedic magazines. Among the newspapers and newsletters are those published at odds with, or in addition to, The Collegian such as Another Voice, The Mill Stream and The Vanguard. In addition to newspapers, Willamette University students have compiled literary magazines, fraternity and sorority publications, and comedic newsletters. The collection ranges between 1850-2014, and has 27.5 linear feet, including files, one oversize box, bound volumes, and digital materials.

A historical note: Individual students, organizations and groups have been gathering and writing since Willamette’s founding. The first known publication, The Experiment, was created in 1850 as a way for students of the Oregon Institute to express themselves. Willamette’s longest running student publication, The Collegian, was begun in 1875. It continues to document the campus climate, events, and students’ reactions to their surroundings.

Contact Ashley Toutain (asharrat@willamette.edu) for more information about this collection, or click here to read more of what she wrote:

http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4010/cpd/0/75/0

 


Your Subject Specialist Librarians

As juniors and seniors, you will research and write more than past semesters.  If you haven’t met with a librarian yet to help with your research, now is an awesome time to get to know them!  Faculty may also wish to contact them for a library instruction session for your class.

They are all very knowledgeable and friendly.  You will see them at the reference desk where you can ask for research help, or set up a time to meet with them one-on-one.

gary_sm Gary Klein
Management & Economics Librarian
gklein@willamette.edu
503-370-6743

Specialty Areas:

john_sm John Repplinger
Science Librarian
jrepplin@willamette.edu
Web Page
503-370-6525

Specialty Areas:

joni_sm Joni Roberts
Associate University Librarian for Public Services and Collection Development
jroberts@willamette.edu
503-370-6741

Specialty Areas:

ford_sm Ford Schmidt
Head of Research Services
fschmidt@willamette.edu
503-375-5407

Specialty Areas:

bonzai Doreen Simonsen
Humanities and Fine Arts Librarian
dsimonse@willamette.edu
503-375-5343

Specialty Areas:

carol_sm Carol Drost
Associate University Librarian for Technical Services
cdrost@willamette.edu
503-370-6715

Specialty Areas:

 

 


Musicality, Metaphor & Metonym

The Department of Art invites you to view “Musicality, Metaphor & Metonymy: Paintings by Tim Timmerman”, this semester’s exhibition in the Roger W. Rogers Gallery.

Timmerman’s paintings narrate the events and dynamics of his own friendships. Timmerman PaintingHe does so by physically creating small, assemblage characters (often using toys and figurines), which he then casts as protagonists and antagonists in the painted dramas that he stages and paints to illuminate, symbolically and allegorically, the dynamics of real relationships. His work shows us that we are most human in our friendships because we enact the full and messy spectrum of our humanity in these close relationships, which cast both our virtues and our frailties in high relief.

More information about the exhibition is available on the Roger W. Rogers Gallery’s website: http://www.willamette.edu/cla/arts/get_involved/exhibitions/rogers/timmerman.html

The Rogers Gallery is located in the Rogers Music Hall. The exhibition will be open to the public until May 17, 2015.

Regards,

Andries Fourie (curator, Roger W. Rogers Gallery)


Summit Interface Changes

On Tuesday, January 20th, 2015 the requesting interface for Summit materials will be more streamlined. In the past, when you chose “Request Summit (5 days),” you had to login to another system, summit.worldcat.org, to request a book or video. On the 20th, you will now place your Summit requests directly in the WU Libraries’ catalog.

When you click the request option, the requesting form will be automatically populated within the catalog frame. You will then be able to select your Pickup/Delivery Location (Hatfield Library or Law Library, and submit the Request. The status of your requests can be monitored under your “My Account.”

If you want to search Worldcat, you can find a link to Worldcat on the databases page.

Please let us know if you have any comments or concerns.