Water Leak on 2nd Floor

2014-leakMassive water leak on 2nd floor of Hatfield Library this morning. As a heads up, books in the HN-HQ call number range have been removed for water damage assessment.

The roof leak was caused by a blown gauge in the HVAC penthouse. Facilities told us that water was spraying and pooling on the floor on the roof directly above the HN-HQ book section. This excess of water leaked through a seam in the roof onto the HVAC system’s insulation. The insulation collected water until it could not hold any more and then began dripping onto the ceiling tiles. These tiles in turn began dripping onto books.

Affected areas span HN – HQ, specifically the northern bays in each row. We have temporarily blocked access to these areas.

The gauge has been repaired, stopping the source of the leak. Residual water is continuing to move through the roof and ceiling. We have positioned plastic sheeting and receptacles throughout the stacks to collect this water–these will be monitored throughout the day.

Books that were removed from affected shelves have been sorted based upon water damage with dry books being placed out of harms way on the study tables near the leak. Technical services staff is currently addressing damaged materials–there are to date 311 damaged books.

 

UPDATE (11-21-14, 2:18pm):

Displaced dry books have been moved to the ranges which used to house the curriculum collection. Books have been grouped by call number (e.g. all HF books have been shelved together) and will be returned to call number order at a later date.
Facilities staff have set up dehumidifiers near the location of the leak in an attempt to expedite the drying process.
The leak, for the most part, has stopped. Plastic sheeting will remain in place, though, for the time being.

Faculty Colloquiums for Spring

Dear Colleagues,

The Faculty Colloquium presentations for this semester have come to an end.  Karen Arabas’ previously scheduled presentation on “Ecological Restoration Work at Zena Forest” has been moved from this coming Friday to February 13th.  Please mark your calendars and join us to hear the intriguing presentations of your colleagues work next Semester.

Time and place:  Friday afternoons at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room.

Refreshments will be served

Spring Semester:

Jan. 30:  Josh Laison: “My Friends the Triangles: The Study of Geometric Networks”

Feb. 6:  Marva Duerksen: “Prosody in Emily Dickinson, and in Musical Settings of her Poems”

Feb. 13:  Karen Arabas:  “Ecological Restoration Work at Zena Forest”

Feb. 27:  Kelley Strawn:  “What’s Behind All This ‘Nones’-Sense? – Examining Religious Non-Affiliation in the United States Over Time”

Mar. 6:  Holland Phillips:  “Echoes of the Danish Folkelig Tradition in Carl Nielsen’s Op. 48.”

Mar. 13:  Bill Duvall:  “Unexpected Writing from an Engaged Intellectual: Ahmed Kalouaz and Adolescent Literature.”

Apr. 3:  Bobby Brewer-Wallin:  “My Case Is Altered or Bodies of Elizabeth: Code-switching in Solo Performance”

Apr. 10:  Abigail Susik: “Surrealism, Stenography and the Ouija Board”

Apr. 24:  Panel on “How Your Research influences Your Teaching”  (Followed by a Reception to celebrate another year of research and excellent teaching)

Sincerely,
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators,

Doreen Simonsen

James Miley


Annual Tree of Giving 2014

treegiving1Items are starting to come in already for the Tree of Giving Book Drive!  We are supporting both Grant and Bush Elementary schools this year, so we are looking forward to strong community support and abundant book donations. Some key things to remember as we approach the final Drive date on December 17th:

- 25% discount at the Willamette Store for Book Drive books

- K-5 Spanish and English language books are needed

- No holiday-themed books, please

- Gloves, hats, and cash for books are also desired

- Drop off locations include the Circulation Desk in the Hatfield Library, the Willamette Store, and the Sparks Center

- For more info visit: http://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving

Please visit our Tree of Giving located near the entrance of the library, and see the beautiful ornaments adorning it.  For every book donated, we will add one ornament to the tree.

So think of the Book Drive as you do your Black Friday shopping!  The Mark O. Hatfield Library, Willamette Store, and Student-Athlete Advisory Committee thanks you for your support.


“The Collegian” Online Archive

Presentation1Digitization is complete!

Willamette University’s long running newspaper, the Collegian, is now available digitally and fully keyword searchable. With unprecedented access to history at your fingertips, what will you search for?

Beginning in November 2013, over 100 years of Collegian issues needed to be unbound and assessed for completeness. Microfilm copies were used to fill in any gaps. The unbound Collegians were then mailed to iArchives and digitized. Once scanning was complete, each image was reviewed to ensure its readability. Over a century of Collegian data was then uploaded to the Academic Commons for publication. The Collegian is now searchable, and browsable, all the way back to its first issue in 1875.

The Collegian is available at: http://library.willamette.edu./archives/collegian


A Contemporary Bestiary

“A Contemporary Bestiary”

September 13 – December 21, 2014

Melvin Henderson-Rubio Gallery

Robert McCauley, [italics] Edge of Town II [/italics] (detail), 2012
Robert McCauley, Edge of Town II (detail), 2012
In cooperation with the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, the Hatfield Library is
housing a temporary exhibit to go with the museum’s current exhibit,
Contemporary Bestiary.  The museum exhibit “features work by artists from
Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana who incorporate animal imagery in
their artwork as a means to address a wide variety of issues.”  The exhibit
includes birds, frogs, dogs, cats, fish, cows, horses, and more and runs
from September 13 through December 21, 2014.  The library has two wonderful
paintings on display near the entrance of the library as well as a
collection of books that complement the exhibit.

For more details about the Contemporary Beastiary exhibit, visit
http://www.willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2014-15/a_contemporary_bestiary.html.

 

 


Calling All Political Junkies!!

Gandalf for PresidentWith election season upon us, be sure and check out the great display of election memorabilia from the political collections of the Willamette archives on the second floor of the library.  The exhibit features bumper stickers, lawn signs, buttons and a variety of other interesting campaign materials.  An adjoining temporary exhibit showcases campaign items from the personal collections of library staff and friends.  Come take a look!   And don’t forget to vote!


Hallie Ford Literary Series: a New Voices Showcase

Please join us for the second event in the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series: a New Voices Showcase, featuring readings by poet Jennifer Richter and essayist Elena Passarello on Tuesday, October 21. The event will take place at 5 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.

 

Richter_JenJennifer Richter was awarded a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lectureship in Poetry by Stanford University, where she taught in the Creative Writing Program for four years. Her poetry collection Threshold was named a 2011 Oregon Book Award Finalist by former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky. Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Natasha Trethewey chose Threshold as winner of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry Open Competition.

Listen to Jennifer read one of her poems here: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/weekly-poem-prayer-for-the-hanoi-man-who-waits-for-breakdowns-on-his-block/

elena-passarelloElena Passarello’s essays on pop culture, music, the performing arts, and the natural world have appeared in Slate, Creative Nonfiction, Normal School, Ninth Letter, and the Iowa Review, among other publications. Her debut nonfiction collection, Let Me Clear My Throat (Sarabande 2012), explores the human voice in popular performance, and she co-wrote a series of devised nonfiction monologues for the 2012 music writing anthology Pop When the World Falls Apart (Duke University Press). A recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts, and the University of Iowa Museum of Art, she teaches at Oregon State University.

And read an interview with Elena here: http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2012/11/28/voices-carry-an-interview-with-elena-passarello/


Willamette Photo Collection

Campus Photographs Collection

To the right, “Class of 1919 in the shape of a W and 19.”

We’re highlighting the Willamette University Campus Photograph Collection from the University Archives this month.  It is comprised of over 2,500 items including photographic prints, negatives, slides, and copy prints of sketches and blueprints, is a rich documentary resource covering nearly a century and a half of Willamette’s history. A strength of the collection is the visual documentation it provides of Willamette’s ever-developing campus, particularly the buildings and landscape. Images show ground-breakings, construction, renovations, fires, and demolitions of various buildings.  Below is a sample of what you will find in this wonderful collection.

This online collection is available for viewing at:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!search:search:aphotos/dicoll^campus+photographs^all^and!

state-street-salem-oregon-1925
“Aerial view in 1925 of the College of Medicine, Willson Park, and the First United Methodist Church.”

Chris-Sprague-Baxter-Hall-corner-stone
“Chris Sprague placing a cornerstone in a wall of Baxter Hall.”

Atkinson-library-circulation-desk
“Atkinson library circulation desk”

"Atkinson Super Computer"
“Atkinson Super Computer”

art-class-with-Robert-Hess
“Art class with Robert Hess and two students.”

chemistry-lab-Collins-Science-Hall
“Chemistry Labs in Collins Science Hall.”

Banned Books Week 2014

banned-bksBanned Books Week is officially Sept 21-27. Celebrate your freedom to read by reading a book from our current Banned Books display, which will be kept up through October on the first floor of the library.  We encourage you to check them out!

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read.  It highlights the value of free and open access to information, and brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

FUN FACTS:

Over this past decade, 5,099 challenges were reported to the Office for Intellectual Freedom. These are the top five reasons…

1,577 challenges due to “sexually explicit” material;
1,291 challenges due to “offensive language”;
989 challenges due to materials deemed “unsuited to age group”;
619 challenged due to “violence”‘ and
361 challenges due to “homosexuality.”
(Source: http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10)

 

2013

Out of 307 challenges as reported by the Office for Intellectual Freedom, the following are the top five most challenged books (Interestingly, the number of challenges are down by 157 challenges from last year.)

  1. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group, violence
  2. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence
  3. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E.L. James
    Reasons
    : Nudity, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  5. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group
  6. A Bad Boy Can Be Good for A Girl, by Tanya Lee Stone
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit
  7. Looking for Alaska, by John Green
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  8. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
    Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  9. Bless Me Ultima, by RudolfoAnaya
    Reasons: Occult/Satanism, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  10. Bone (series), by Jeff Smith
    Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence

For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week visit the ALA Banned Books web site:

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek

Source: ALA Banned Books web site


Poet: Marilyn Chin

Marilyn Chin, the award-winning author of a novel and four volumes of poetry, including Rhapsody in Plain Yellow, The Phoenix Gone, the Terrace Empty, and the newly released Hard Love Province will be the first speaker in the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series. Born in Hong Kong and raised in Portland, Oregon, her books have become Asian American classics and are taught in classrooms all over the world.chin2 In addition to teaching in the MFA program at San Diego State University, she serves as a mentor on the international faculty of the City University of Hong Kong’s low-residency MFA program, the first of its kind in Asia. Chin’s talk will take place on Thursday, October 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. Books will be for sale, courtesy of the Willamette Store.