Government Info during the 2013 Shutdown

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Thankfully, the government shutdown is now over and most of the “free” resources we regularly access are back online.  We just want to remind you that we have a Government Information guide that will help lead you to available government information after the 2013 Government Shutdown at http://libguides.willamette.edu/gov-info

The government shutdown may have impacted your research, depending on your research interests. If you depended on sites like the USGS, US Census Bureau, USDA, NASA, NLM (National Library of Medicine’s PubMed,, and Whitehouse.gov you will have encounter messages like the ones below. While Willamette relies a great deal on e-resources from government web site, we still do get selected print materials as do many of our Summit libraries since we are apart of the Federal Depository Library Program.  We also have a great deal of electronic documents such as ERIC (Dept of Education) and PubMed (aka Medline) through our subscription databases. So while official web sites and search engines may have been down, check our library catalog for print materials, and our databases for electronic materials.

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USGS Shutdown Message

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Institute of Education Shutdown Message

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NASA Shutdown Message

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Archives & Special Collections Constance Fowler

(Excerpts from the historical notes of Constance Fowler’s Collection in the Archives & Special Collections.)

constance-fowler-waller-hall-artThe Constance Fowler Collection consists of her biographical records, correspondence, exhibition catalogues and fliers, reviews, publications, manuscripts, selections from her library, as well as examples of her prints, printing blocks, paintings, and drawings.

Fowler taught art lessons in Salem for one dollar a session and, in 1935, volunteered as advisor to an art club at Willamette University. That same year, the University’s president, Bruce Baxter, hired Fowler to teach art and to establish the school’s first art department (art lessons had been taught at Willamette since the nineteenth century, by Marie Craig Le Gall and others, but there had been no department). Fowler taught at Willamette for twelve years, until 1947.

For three summers (1936, 1937, 1938), Fowler was the recipient of the prestigious (and in the Depression years highly desirable) Carnegie grants to help art teachers complete their Master’s of Fine Art degrees. Carnegie programs were offered on two campuses in the country-Harvard University and University of Oregon. Fowler studied at Oregon with the architectural philosopher W. R. B. Willcox (whom she held in highest regard throughout her life), the painter Andrew Vincent, and others. She earned her M.F.A. degree in 1940, her Master’s thesis project being the execution of twenty wood engravings of historic sites in the Willamette Valley, which she published (with text) as The Old Days. In and Near Salem. Oregon (Frank McCaffrey’s Dogwood Press, Seattle, 1940). The book was immediately popular, respected for the quality of the prints, the design. layout, and typography of the book itself, and the historic commentary, based on original research, written by Fowler to accompany her engravings. The Old Days remained Fowler’s single most significant accomplishment; in 1969, in retirement, she arranged for the publication of seventy-five additional books, with engravings printed from the original cherry wood blocks.

 

 


Banned Book Week 2013

banned-bksBanned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

2012

Out of 464 challenges as reported by the Office for Intellectual Freedom, these were the top 10 books challenged from 2013.
  1. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey.
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group
  2. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie.
    Reasons: Offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group
  3. Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher.
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, suicide, unsuited for age group
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E. L. James.
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit
  5. And Tango Makes Three, by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson.
    Reasons: Homosexuality, unsuited for age group
  6. The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini.
    Reasons: Homosexuality, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  7. Looking for Alaska, by John Green.
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group
  8. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
    Reasons: Unsuited for age group, violence
  9. The Glass Castle, by Jeanette Walls
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit
  10. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Sexually explicit, religious viewpoint, violence

 

For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week visit the ALA Banned Books web site:

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek

Source: ALA Banned Books web site


New “Summit” Library System

Big changes are in store for Willamette University. Starting in June 2013 the movement from 37 to one begins. We are moving with our Summit partner libraries from 37 stand-alone library systems to one shared system to improve the research experience for our students and faculty and to better manage our resources. The popular library system you have used to search for information and borrow library materials is being replaced by a new, improved user interface which will make it easier for you to find the information you need and get the items you are looking for both here at Willamette and through Summit.

Willamette University is a member of the Orbis Cascade Alliance, a consortium of 37 academic libraries across Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. The Alliance is the engine behind Summit but it is not the only initiative on which the 37 libraries collaborate. As a group, we are working toward unlocking opportunities that will help us to build our collections as a single collection, share services and resources, and exploit new technologies. This move from 37 to one will help us achieve those goals. Better managing our resources and creating efficiencies in processes will enable staff to focus on value added activities that will benefit our users and our institutions.Under Construction

Because this is a big migration from many systems to one, it will take 18 months to get all Alliance libraries up and running. In the meantime, you will experience a hybrid system, with many of the advantages of the new, next generation system and a few remnants of the old. All the benefits of the new system will become operational when the last group of libraries goes-live. Willamette is one of the first institutions to move to this new environment, so our services may be a bit bumpy during the transition. Information on how to use this new interface (including use of mobile apps) will be coming soon!

We appreciate your patience and good humor as we move to this better, easier to use library system.

Find out more about our new system coming in June 2013, or go to our FAQ page.

 


Popular Books Reading List

The semester is wrapping up, and you see the light at the end of the tunnel.  You may even begin to wonder what you’re going to do with your spare time over the summer.

Consider picking up a fun book to read.   Below are some books from . This collection includes a wide variety of materials such as fantasy, science fiction, mysteries, biographies, memoirs, and more. We’ve got something for everyone!  All of the titles from this collection are included in the library’s catalog so you can search by title or author to locate these items or  do a keyword search of the phrase “Hatfield Popular Reading collection.” To view all of the book in the Popular Reading Collection, click this link.

Below are some examples of items you’ll find in the Hatfield Library’s Popular Reading Collection.

 

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Life after life: a novel – Atkinson, Kate

Call Number: PR6051.T56 L54 2013

 

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House of earth: a novel – Guthrie, Woody

Call Number: PS3513.U9 H68 2013

 

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Six years – Coben, Harlan

Call Number: PS3553.O225 S59 2013

 

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The golden egg – Leon, Donna

Call Number: PS3562.E534 G65 2013

 

 

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The burgess boys: a novel – Strout, Elizabeth

Call Number: PS3569.T736 B87 2013

 

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Fuse – Baggott, Julianna

Call Number: PZ7.B14026 Fu 2013

 

 

 


Archives & Special Collections: Robert C. Notson Papers

The Robert C. Notson Papers consist of the personal and professional papers of Robert C. Notson, journalist, editor and publisher of The Oregonian from 1925 to 1975 and long-time Willamette University Board of Trustee member.

While at The Oregonian, Notson also served on various committees and boards. He was director of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) from 1962 to 1968 and served as president from 1966 to 1967, during which time he had occasion to meet with President Lyndon B. Johnson at the White House. He was President of Willamette University’s Alumni Association in 1930 and served on the Board of Trustees from 1931 to 1971 (vice president from 1958 to 1971), later honored as a Willamette University Life Trustee. He served as a board member of the Associated Press Managing Editors Association (APMEA) from 1959 to 1965 and he was a member of the Advisory Council of the University of Oregon Health Sciences Center (UOHSC) after his retirement from The Oregonian. In his capacity as a Mayflower descendant, Notson was an active participant in both the General Society of Mayflower Descendants (GSMD) and the Society of Mayflower Descendants in the State of Oregon (SMDSO), serving, among other roles, as deputy governor and program chair of the latter organization.

The collection also contains materials related to his involvement in the Society of Mayflower Descendants and scrapbooks of Notson’s life as well as scrapbooks belonging to his wife, Adelia (White) Notson, and daughter, Jane (Notson) Gregg, documenting their respective experiences while students at Willamette University.

More information is available at:

http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/2876/cpd/0/16/0

 

 


World Book Night 2013 Photo

Here are some photos from this year’s World Book Night.  We hope those who received a copy of the book Glaciers enjoy reading it, and will pass it along to someone else after they’re finished reading it.  Let us know what you thought of this book, and what you thought of World Book Night by commenting on this blog post or Facebook!

Two prospective students receive copies of Glaciers while touring Willamette.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fun in the sun and World Book Night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By the Mill Stream on World Book Night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We posted a code word on Facebook to receive the book Glaciers, and within minutes someone someone came up to claim their “prize.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These two friends agreed to take turns and share the book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Really excited to get a copy of Glaciers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just coming from class and I got a book!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students receive copies of Glaciers from librarian John Repplinger on World Book Night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the right place and time by Goudy to get a copy of the book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Couldn’t wait to get a copy of this book!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students by the Mill Stream listen to Glaciers being read to them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A student in the Quad receives his copy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cat Cavern was one place we stopped to drop of a book. Most people were outside by the Mill Stream!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The last copy of Glaciers finds its way home.

 

 

 

 


Better than Printing Tip #12: Condensing Photos and Image DPI

Condense your images. Shrink your photos or reduce Dots per Inch (DPI).

Large images can slow down your printing and waste paper on drafts. Here are some tips to help reduce waste and speed up printing.

    • Use placeholders for your images until your final drafts. Not only will it save a ton of paper but it can help you focus on the flow of the words and transitions.

  • If you have high resolution images (DPI — dots per inch), save them at lower resolution.  One way is to use Photoshop to change your DPI.  Copy your image, then open Photoshop, and click File and new.  A box will open in which you can change your DPI.  We recommend 75 DPI.  Photoshop is available on all campus computer labs.  

 


Better than Printing Tip #10: Condensing PowerPoint Slides

Did you know you can print several slides on one page? PowerPoint, Keynote, even Google Presentations all offer slick ways to print 2x,  4x, or even 6x slides on one pages. It’s perfect for lab references, taking notes, or just plain turning that monstrosity into a 6 page lapdog.

BONUS user-submitted tip! Print More than one page on a single sheet from PDFs:

 

 


Better than Printing Tip #9: Improve Reading on a Computer Screen

Better Than Printing Tip #9: Improve Reading on a Computer Screen.

Reading on a screen can be uncomfortable and exhausting on the eyes. Glare, contrast, and scrolling constantly cause eyestrain quickly. To improve your reading experience on screens, try adjusting nearby light sources, dial down the whites in your monitor, and use tools to hide distracting parts e-articles.

Check out these links for more details:http://lifehacker.com/5890461/how-to-make-reading-on-your-computer-a-better-experience

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2013/03/08/how-to-read-a-computer-screen-the-latest-tools-to-ease-on-screen-reading/