Annual Tree of Giving 2014

treegiving1Items are starting to come in already for the Tree of Giving Book Drive!  We are supporting both Grant and Bush Elementary schools this year, so we are looking forward to strong community support and abundant book donations. Some key things to remember as we approach the final Drive date on December 17th:

- 25% discount at the Willamette Store for Book Drive books

- K-5 Spanish and English language books are needed

- No holiday-themed books, please

- Gloves, hats, and cash for books are also desired

- Drop off locations include the Circulation Desk in the Hatfield Library, the Willamette Store, and the Sparks Center

- For more info visit: http://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving

Please visit our Tree of Giving located near the entrance of the library, and see the beautiful ornaments adorning it.  For every book donated, we will add one ornament to the tree.

So think of the Book Drive as you do your Black Friday shopping!  The Mark O. Hatfield Library, Willamette Store, and Student-Athlete Advisory Committee thanks you for your support.


“The Collegian” Online Archive

Presentation1Digitization is complete!

Willamette University’s long running newspaper, the Collegian, is now available digitally and fully keyword searchable. With unprecedented access to history at your fingertips, what will you search for?

Beginning in November 2013, over 100 years of Collegian issues needed to be unbound and assessed for completeness. Microfilm copies were used to fill in any gaps. The unbound Collegians were then mailed to iArchives and digitized. Once scanning was complete, each image was reviewed to ensure its readability. Over a century of Collegian data was then uploaded to the Academic Commons for publication. The Collegian is now searchable, and browsable, all the way back to its first issue in 1875.

The Collegian is available at: http://library.willamette.edu./archives/collegian


Oregonian, Birds of North America, Oregon Newspaper Sources

We have just added three excellent resources to our digital collection, in addition to the recent addition of Science: Birds of North America Online, the Oregonian, and the Oregon Newspaper Sources.

bna

 

Birds of North America Online is a database of over 716 species of birds that live and migrate through North America, including Hawaii and Canada.  It includes a multimedia collection for every bird, including top quality audio and videos galleries, and rich collection of article information for each species for pretty much anything you would want to know about a specific bird.  So if your curious what birds you saw outside your window or heard singing, this will be an outstanding resources!

oregonian-bna-newspapers

 

The Oregonian newspaper (ranges from 1987-present).  There is a one day delay, so you won’t be able to read through the current day’s edition. We’ve had very spotty electronic access to recent editions of the Oregonian, but this gives us reliable full text coverage back to 1987.

 

Oregon Newspaper Sources is a collection of 51 of the largest Oregon-based newspapers, including the Statesman Journal newspaper, Oregonian, and Eugene Register-Guard that can be search simultaneously or individually.  You can even browse individual editions of newspapers by sections.


Library Spaces During 2014 Finals

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We have prepared the library for Finals Week!  Starting April 25th we have extended library hours (click here for details) through Sunday May 11th, including our ever popular free cookies and coffee which are available after 10pm to our fabulous Willamette students.

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Starting next Wednesday, the Hatfield Room will be temporarily designated as a quiet study space during finals week. This compliments the quiet second floor of the library rule. There are two large whiteboards if you need large writing areas to help you think (two more white boards are located downstairs for group study). We also bring in large tables to spread out your work, and some soft chairs for relaxing.
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We have a popular reading collection available downstairs in case you need to break loose from the academic rigor of finals and just enjoy a fun, non-academic book. We will also have a coloring station to let that creativity flow!
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Some other things: We have a recording room which might be handy to those who need to practice a presentation or make a recording for a language class.  We have two printers on the second floor, two on the first floor, and one printer in the Fish Bowl in case one of the printers goes down.  We have soft seating scattered around the library for relaxation, and hard wood-backed chairs if you prefer a more solid chair.  And below is a map of the power outlet to keep your laptops and cell phones humming!

We wish you the best throughout your finals!

Outlets 2013

Faculty Works Display 2014

The Hatfield Library will have a large selection of faculty works on display on the first floor of the library from April 1st through May 11th.  The collection ranges from music score arrangements to photos of theatre productions and selections of scholarly research articles and books written by Willamette faculty.  (And feel free to browse through the articles written by our faculty).

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Featured Database: GeoRef

georefGeoRef is a geoscience database that provides access to over 2,000,000 records for the world’s geological sciences literature, including journal articles, books, maps, conference papers, and theses.

Produced by the American Geosciences Institute, this comprehensive geosciences database contains 3.4 million bibliographic records to the geosciences literature of the world. Over 3,500 journals are reviewed for indexing in the GeoRef database as well as books, maps, government reports, conference papers, theses and dissertations.  Over 100,000 references are added to GeoRef annually.

It is truly an indispensable research tool, and a first-stop when researching anything related to the earth sciences.  The geology of North America is covered from 1669 to the present, and global coverage dates back to 1933. In fact, the Library Journal had this to say about this resource: “[The] Advanced Search, with its elegantly laid-out tool set for crafting very precise search strategies, gives the user great control over the whole search process.”


Research Award $500 Cash Prize!

Money, Money, Money…

Have you written and researched an amazing paper this year?  If so, we’ve got good news…the library is sponsoring its annual MOHL Research Award and you may be eligible to win a $500 cash prize! The award will be given for a student paper in any discipline that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources.  Last year’s award winner was then junior Miles Sari’s for his paper “‘Piece of Me’—A Framing Analysis of the Deconstruction and Reconstruction of Britney Spears.”

To be eligible for this award, the paper must have been written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work and in the current academic year (Fall 2013/Spring 2014). For complete details and instructions see:  libmedia.willamette.edu/award.

*Papers done as a senior project but in the junior year are excluded.

research-awards-2014

National Nutrition Month

Image source: nih.gov Nutrition Month
Image source: NIH.gov Nutrition Month

March is National Nutrition Month! After the past few months of holiday meals, you may be motivated to start eating more nutritiously and exercise regularly.  A big emphasis during this month is simply to make INFORMED CHOICES about the food you eat and to develop sound eating and physical activity habits. Remember to not give up on changing your goal of living healthier.  Good habits take a long time to establish (66 days or more).

Here are a few tips taken from EATRIGHT.ORG:

  1. Explore New Foods, Flavors and ‘Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.’ If your food begins to loose its luster, adding more nutrition and pleasure to each meal is as easy as expanding the range of foods you choose. Try one new fruit, vegetable or whole grain every week. Start small by picking a different type of apple, a different color potato or a new flavor of whole-grain rice until you are comfortable picking entirely new things that you’ve never tried or heard of before.
  2. The next time you eat out, choose a restaurant that features ethnic foods from Asia, Europe or Africa. These restaurants often feature menus filled with healthy options that will be new to you.
  3. If you prepare your own meals, add a pinch of this or that to give your regular dishes some additional zing.  Remember, you have about 10,000 taste buds, so don’t be afraid to try something new.

The National Library of Medicine has some great suggestions for eating habits and behaviors:

  1. A food journal is a good tool to help you learn about your eating habits. Keep a food journal for 1 week.
    • Write down what you eat, how much, and what times of day you are eating.
    • Include notes about what else you were doing and how you were feeling, such as being hungry, stressed, tired, or bored. For example, maybe you were at work and were bored. So you got a snack from a vending machine down the hall from your desk.
    • At the end of the week, review your journal and look at your eating patterns. Decide which habits you want to change.
  2. Reflect on your food journal.  Look at your journal and circle any regular or repetitive triggers. Some of these might be:
    • You see your favorite snack in the pantry or vending machine
    • When you watch television
    • You feel stressed by something at work or in another area of your life
    • You have no plan for dinner after a long day
    • You go to work events where food is served
    • You stop at fast-food restaurants for breakfast and choose high fat, high calorie foods
    • You need a pick-me-up toward the end of your workday
  3. Replace your old habits with new ones.
    1. Find health choices for snacks and plan ahead. Take only a small portion, put it in a dish and put the rest away. Eat fruit and yogurt in the mid-afternoon about 3 or 4 hours after lunch.
    2. Eat only when you are hungry. Eating when you are feel worried, tense, or bored also leads to overeating. Instead, call a friend or go for a walk to help you feel better.
    3. Eat Slowly. Eating too quickly leads to overeating when the food you have eaten has not yet reached your stomach and told your brain you are full. You will know you are eating too quickly if you feel stuffed about 20 minutes after you stop eating.
    4. Plan your meals. Know what you will eat ahead of time so you can avoid buying unhealthy foods (impulse buying) or eating at fast-food restaurants.
    5. Get rid of unhealthy foods. Put them out of sight or in hard to reach places.  Replace your candy dish with a bowl of fruit or nuts.
  4. An old saying goes: “Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.”
    1. Breakfast sets the tone for the day. A hearty, healthy breakfast will give your body the energy it needs to get you to lunch.
    2. Plan a good lunch that will satisfy you, and a healthy afternoon snack that will keep you from becoming to hungry before dinner time.
    3. Avoid skipping meals. Missing a regular meal or snack often leads to overeating or making unhealthy choices.

     

Don’t forget that we have a huge selection of books dealing with nutrition.  A few of them are highlighted this month on our WU Reads page.


Edible Book Festival, 2014 Announcement

edible-books-2014

The Mark O. Hatfield Library invites you to participate in the third annual
EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!

Friday, March 14, 2014.  Hatfield Room.

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year.  Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

Some of last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle Public Library, UCLA, and Duke University. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Free to enter– no registration required.  Drop off your entry in the Hatfield Room on March 14 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.  If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display.  Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book until 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

All entries will be on display from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.  Even if you don’t enter, you can cast a vote for your favorite edible book.  At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—David Craig (Biology), Ford Schmidt (Hatfield Library), and a CLA student (tbd) —will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Student Entry
  • Most Literary
  •  Most Creative
  • Punniest
  •  People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners.  For more information and to view all photos of the last two year’s entries, go to:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2013/03/19/edible-book-festival-2013-results/

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2012/04/06/firstedible-books-festival-2012/

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu

Prizes awarded:

  • People’s Choice – “The Monster Book of Monsters” by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman.
  • Best Student Entry – “One Cake to Rule Them All” by Kelsey Kinavey.
  • Most Creative – “Lord of Pies” by Kelly Slaughter.
  • Most Literary – (Tie) “The Picture of Dorian Souffle” by Maureen Ricks; “Lay’s Miserables” by Katie Mariman.
  • Punniest – (Three-way tie) “Their Fries Were Watching Cod” by Sophie Hearn; “Their Eyes Were Watching Cod” by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar; “Pride and Prego Dish” by Liz Butterfield. 
  • Honorable Mention – “Hop on Pop” by Sara Amato.

 

“The Monster Book of Monsters”

Inspired by Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
By J.K. Rowling
Created by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman

People’s Choice

 

 

“One Cake to Rule Them All”

Inspired by The Lord of the Rings By JRR Tolkein
Created by Kelsey Kinavey

Best Student Entry

 

 

  “Lord of the Pies”

Inspired by Lord of the Flies
By William Golding
Created by Kelly Slaughter

Most Creative

  The Picture of Dorian Souffle

Inspired by The Picture of Dorian Gray
By Oscar Wilde
Created by Maureen Ricks

(Tie) Most Literary

 

Lay’s Miserables

Inspired by Les Miserables
By Victor Hugo
Created by Katie Mariman

(Tie) Most Literary

 

Their Fries Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Sophie Hearn

(Tie) Punniest

 

Their Eyes Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar

(Tie) Punniest

Pride and Prego Dish

Inspired by Pride and Prejudice
By Jane Austen
Created by Liz Butterfield

(Tie) Punniest

 

Hop on Pop

Inspired by Hop on Pop
By Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel)
Created by Sara Amato

Honorable Mention

 

 

 


Featuring Health Source

fruit-slcdWe’re are featuring the database Health Source this month in celebration of National Nutrition Month.   It is one of our lesser known electronic resources, but extremely useful if you are researching health or nutritional topics.

Health Source provides the full text to over 270 periodicals covering nutrition, exercise, medical self-care, drugs and alcohol, and much more. You’ll find plenty of scholarly articles in this database, but in addition to the full text offerings, this database indexes and abstracts for over 430 periodicals.

This database also provides full text for over 1,090 pamphlets and 23 books.  Health Source is an Ebsco Host databases, so you may recognize the interface.

ebsco-logoRead our previous blog post about National Nutrition Month.