2015 Edible Book Festival Results

Fourth Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our fourth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 11th, 2015, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners!!!  Karen Wilkens, Grace Pochis, Robert Minato, Carol Drost, and Elaine Goff.  It was fun to see these artistic-flavored literary inspirations.  What a delicious way to spend an afternoon.  Congratulations to our five winners!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event.

 

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
e14 “Humpty Dumpty”

Created by
Karen Wilkens
Inspired by
William Wallace Denslow’s
“Humpty Dumpty”
People’s Choice
e3 “The Most Delicious Trojan War

Created by
Grace Pochis
Inspired by
Homer’s
“The Illiad”
Best Student Entry
e11 A Confederacy of Lunches

Created by
Robert Minato
Inspired by
John Kennedy Toole’s
“A Confederacy of Dunces”
Most Creative
e5 Ketchup in the Rye

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
J.D. Salinger’s
“A Catcher in the Rye”
Most Literary
e18-3 “The Maize Runner

Created by
Elaine Goff
Inspired by
James Dashner’s
“The Maze Runner”
Punniest

 

Other Entries …………………………….. ……………………………..
e1 “Hairy Pot and the Deathly Marshmallows”

Created by
Lucas Rigsby
Inspired by
J. K. Rowling’s
“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”
e2 “Hamlet”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
William Shakespeare’s
“Hamlet”
e4 “The Salad of the Bad Cafe”

Created by
Erica Miller
Inspired by
Carson McCullers’
“The Ballad of the Sad Cafe”
e6 “The Lorax”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Dr. Seuss’
“The Lorax”
e7 “The Tender’s Shame”

Created by
Kelly Slaughter
Inspired by
Orson Scott Card’s
“Ender’s Game”
e8 “Cats in Jam or Kids”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Rudolph Dirks’s
“Katzenjammer Kids”
e9 “5280 Feet”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Stephen King’s
“The Green Mile”
e10 “50 Shades of Grey(tings)”

Created by
Anonymous
Inspired by
E L James
“50 Shareds of Grey”
e12-2 “Against: the Grains”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Mark Hatfield’s
“Against the Grain”
 e13 “Fish in Thyme”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
Laurel Bradley‘s
“A Wish in Time”
e15 “The Candy Shop Wars”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Brandon Mull’s
“The Candy Shop Wars”
e16 “A Tail of Two Kitties”

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Charles Dickens’s
“A Tail of Two Cities”
e17 “Ginger Pie”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Eleanor Estes’
“Ginger Pye”
e19 “50 Shades of Earl Grey”

Created by
Bev Ecklund
Inspired by
E.L. James’
“50 Shades of Grey”
e20 “The Great Catsby”

Created by
Georgia Mayfield
Inspired by
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s
“The Great Gatsby”
e21 “Twelve Inches of Paradise”

Created by
Emma Jones
Inspired by
John Kennedy Toole’s
“A Confederacy of Dunces”
  Additional Photos
carol-drost

Carol Drost

Most Literacy Award

 hamlet “Hamlet”
karen-wilkens Karen Wilkens

People’s Choice Award

candyshop-wars “Candy Shop Wars”
grace-pochis Grace Pochis

Best Student Entry Award

judges-decision Judges Decisions:
Mike Chasar (English), Karen Wood (University Chaplain), and Kaitlen McPherson (CLA student)
robert-minato Robert Minato

Most Creative Award

judges-decision2 Anticipating the Results
elaine-goff

Elaine Goff

Punniest Award

tail-of-two-cats “A Tail of Two Kitties”
great-catsby “The Great Catsby” voting Reviewing the entries before casting a vote for the People’s Choice Award
cats-in-jam-or-kids “Cats in Jam or Kids” buffet Buffet of Entries

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 2014, 2013, and 2012.


WEDNESDAY!!! Edible Book Festival Reminder

Just a quick reminder about tomorrow’s (Wed) Edible Book Festival!

Grab some food and see what you come up with.  Here are some ideas from the Seattle Public Library’s Edible Book Festival, if you need inspiration:

hunger-games

 

 

 

 

“The Hunger Games”

lord-of-fries

 

 

 

 

“The Lord of the Flies”

the-help

 

 

 

 

“The Help”

scarlet-letter

 

 

 

 

“The Scarlet Letter”

war-peace

 

 

 

 

“War & Peace”

A full description of the event and photos of last year are available at:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2015/02/23/2015-edible-book-festival/


The Rex Amos Papers in the Willamette Archives

4099
Photo by Pete Beattie

Collage artist Rex Amos was born on August 13, 1935 in Wallace, Idaho to Frenche Harland “Bud” Amos and Jean (Johnstone) Amos. Amos was raised in Burke, Idaho, moving with his parents and brother, Clinton, to Portland, Oregon around the age of seven. Amos graduated from Washington High School in 1953 and was drafted into the U.S. Army shortly thereafter. Having grown up near Mt. Hood, Amos’s first choice would have been to be on the Army ski patrol, but instead he served as a machine gunner in the infantry from 1954 to 1956 because of his excellent marksmanship. Upon Amos’s return from the Army, his father made two attempts on Amos’s life. These assaults by his father continued a pattern of abuse, which had been prevalent throughout Amos’s childhood. To break the cycle of violence that had been visited upon the family, Amos moved his mother to a flat in Southeast Portland. It was there he met his future wife, Diane Smith.

In around 1960 Amos, Diane, and his mother Jean moved to The Village, a neighborhood in Southwest Portland full of musicians, writers, and artists. There Amos’s creativity blossomed. A jazz drummer at this time, he broke the world record for marathon drumming, playing for 82 hours. When the musicians union revoked his union card for playing this unsanctioned job, Amos moved to Big Sur, California, with friend Ron Marcus. He and Marcus worked at the Big Sur Inn and lived in a shack under a bridge. It was there Amos found his passion for creating art. Having little money for supplies, Amos began creating assemblages from materials he found in the area. At the time, Amos considered his work more an expression of political and social critique than an aesthetic creation.

Prior to this, Amos had begun studying at Portland State University (PSU) majoring in philosophy and literature and was awarded his B. S. in 1969. In the midst of his study, he befriended PSU philosophy professor Dr. Graham P. Conroy. While a student, Amos conceived and named the philosophy of Preliminism in the early 1960s. He then gave Preliminism to Conroy because Conroy deemed the giving of philosophy impossible.

After moving to a large house behind a dry cleaners on S. W. 11th and Montgomery near Portland State, Amos was able to obtain a dump license which made it possible for him to collect materials for assemblages. On a trip to New York City with friend Greg Stone in 1961, Amos visited the Museum of Modern Art and saw “The Art of Assemblage” exhibit where he was amazed to discover that he had been creating works similar to those on display.

When the city stopped issuing dump licenses, Amos turned to paper as a medium of expression. He gained much of his artistic training and inspiration through practice and by studying other artists. Meeting the painter Matt Glavin, who was teaching at UC Berkeley, transformed Amos’s vision. Glavin introduced him to the process of chine collé and made it possible for him to use the facilities at Magnolia Editions. Amos has continued to work in assemblage as well as in various forms of collage.

A signature of Amos’s collages are the images he uses, which are meticulously cut from published materials using scissors intended for eye surgery – a process that has earned him the moniker “The Cutter.” Amos then carefully selects from thousands of these images to create detailed collages infused with literary, historical, religious, and philosophical allusions. Amos’s collages have been featured in galleries and museums such as the Portland Art Museum, Magnolia Editions, the Corvallis Art Center, the 12×16 Gallery, and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Many of these are in the style of chine collé, which is a combination of collage and print-making techniques.

After more than 50 years in Portland, Amos and Diane, a retired secondary school English teacher, now live in Cannon Beach, Oregon. For more information on Amos, visit his website.


Content Description

The Rex Amos papers are a collection of artwork, journals and diaries, biographical material, correspondence, photographs, and writings compiled by Amos. The collection also contains an oral history interview conducted with Amos in 2014. A wealth of information about Amos’s life can be found in his correspondence and writings gathered largely from the mid-1950s to the 2010s. He documents his challenging childhood, his feelings about contemporary events, and the trials of friends and family’s diseases, deaths, and suicides. Amos’s oral history provides context to his papers and to his artwork. His correspondence reveals information about his own life as well as of the lives of those with whom he is writing, giving a unique look at life in Oregon and California through the second half of the twentieth century. There is video, newspaper, and Amos’s written documentation of his care for his mother, Jean, while she had Alzheimer’s disease. The Rex Amos papers represent Amos’s lifetime as an artist: as an extra in Paint Your Wagon; as a jazz drummer in Portland; as an assemblage artist of materials near his home in Big Sur, California; as a collage artist creating ‘gutterscapes’ from scraps of used paper; to a collage artist creating chine collé for art galleries and museums in Oregon and California.

These papers also represent Amos’s life as a philosopher. Amos conceived and named the philosophy of Preliminism, the theory and practice of practice. Preliminism is represented throughout Amos’s papers, mentioned in correspondence, in his writing and referenced in news articles related to his work. His papers also reflect his life as a fly fisherman, clammer, and overall outdoorsman.

Along with Amos’s own materials are those that he has gathered about friends and other Pacific Northwest artists. These include artwork, books, photographs, video, and writings of Amos’s family and many area artists. Amos’s wife, Diane, assisted in the organization and appraisal of the materials, adding context to much of the materials and many of the people featured in the papers. The Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University has a collection of Amos’s artwork.

This information was originally written by Ashley Toutain, Processing Archivist and Records Manager at the Mark O. Hatfield Library for the Rex Amos papers collection. For additional info, visit:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4216

The source of the images below come from:
http://www.willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2012-13/amos_gallery/index.html#0

 

01 02 03 04

2015 EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL

The Mark O. Hatfield Library invites you to participate in the fourth annual EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!

Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Hatfield Room.edible-books-2015

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

Some of last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle Public Library and Duke University, or check out flickr. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Free to enter– no registration required. Drop off your entry in the Hatfield Room on March 11 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book until 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

All entries will be on display from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Even if you don’t enter, you can cast a vote for your favorite edible book. At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges– Mike Chasar (English), Karen Wood (University Chaplain), and Kaitlen McPherson (CLA student) — will announce the prizes for:

Best Student Entry

Most Literary

Most Creative

Punniest

People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners. To view all photos of last year’s entries, go to:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2014/03/20/edible-book-festival-results-2014/

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu

Last year’s winners:

Award Winners
war-and-peas2 “War and Peas”

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
People’s Choice
pitcher-dory-gray “Pitcher of Dory in Gray

Created by Emily Wetherford
Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s
Portrait of Dorian Gray”
Best Student Entry
dune He Who Controls the
Spice Controls the Universe

Created by Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by Frank Herbert’s
“Dune”
Most Creative
war-and-peas War and Peas

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Most Literary
wholey-bible2 The Hole-y Bible

Created by Anna Corner
Inspired by “The Holy Bible”
Punniest

Student Publications Collection

student-publications-collThe Willamette University Archives has recently released a new collection called the Student Publications collection.  The Student Publications collection includes literary publications, magazines, newsletters, and newspapers created by Willamette University student organizations and groups. Included are the long-running school newspaper The Collegian; the student yearbook, The Wallulah; the Tokyo International University of America yearbook; literary journals; and comedic magazines. Among the newspapers and newsletters are those published at odds with, or in addition to, The Collegian such as Another Voice, The Mill Stream and The Vanguard. In addition to newspapers, Willamette University students have compiled literary magazines, fraternity and sorority publications, and comedic newsletters. The collection ranges between 1850-2014, and has 27.5 linear feet, including files, one oversize box, bound volumes, and digital materials.

A historical note: Individual students, organizations and groups have been gathering and writing since Willamette’s founding. The first known publication, The Experiment, was created in 1850 as a way for students of the Oregon Institute to express themselves. Willamette’s longest running student publication, The Collegian, was begun in 1875. It continues to document the campus climate, events, and students’ reactions to their surroundings.

Contact Ashley Toutain (asharrat@willamette.edu) for more information about this collection, or click here to read more of what she wrote:

http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4010/cpd/0/75/0

 


Your Subject Specialist Librarians

As juniors and seniors, you will research and write more than past semesters.  If you haven’t met with a librarian yet to help with your research, now is an awesome time to get to know them!  Faculty may also wish to contact them for a library instruction session for your class.

They are all very knowledgeable and friendly.  You will see them at the reference desk where you can ask for research help, or set up a time to meet with them one-on-one.

gary_sm Gary Klein
Management & Economics Librarian
gklein@willamette.edu
503-370-6743

Specialty Areas:

john_sm John Repplinger
Science Librarian
jrepplin@willamette.edu
Web Page
503-370-6525

Specialty Areas:

joni_sm Joni Roberts
Associate University Librarian for Public Services and Collection Development
jroberts@willamette.edu
503-370-6741

Specialty Areas:

ford_sm Ford Schmidt
Head of Research Services
fschmidt@willamette.edu
503-375-5407

Specialty Areas:

bonzai Doreen Simonsen
Humanities and Fine Arts Librarian
dsimonse@willamette.edu
503-375-5343

Specialty Areas:

carol_sm Carol Drost
Associate University Librarian for Technical Services
cdrost@willamette.edu
503-370-6715

Specialty Areas:

 

 


Annual Tree of Giving 2014

treegiving1Items are starting to come in already for the Tree of Giving Book Drive!  We are supporting both Grant and Bush Elementary schools this year, so we are looking forward to strong community support and abundant book donations. Some key things to remember as we approach the final Drive date on December 17th:

- 25% discount at the Willamette Store for Book Drive books

- K-5 Spanish and English language books are needed

- No holiday-themed books, please

- Gloves, hats, and cash for books are also desired

- Drop off locations include the Circulation Desk in the Hatfield Library, the Willamette Store, and the Sparks Center

- For more info visit: http://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving

Please visit our Tree of Giving located near the entrance of the library, and see the beautiful ornaments adorning it.  For every book donated, we will add one ornament to the tree.

So think of the Book Drive as you do your Black Friday shopping!  The Mark O. Hatfield Library, Willamette Store, and Student-Athlete Advisory Committee thanks you for your support.


“The Collegian” Online Archive

Collegian-1900Digitization is complete!

Willamette University’s long running newspaper, the Collegian, is now available digitally and fully keyword searchable. With unprecedented access to history at your fingertips, what will you search for?

Beginning in November 2013, over 100 years of Collegian issues needed to be unbound and assessed for completeness. Microfilm copies were used to fill in any gaps. The unbound Collegians were then mailed to iArchives and digitized. Once scanning was complete, each image was reviewed to ensure its readability. Over a century of Collegian data was then uploaded to the Academic Commons for publication. The Collegian is now searchable, and browsable, all the way back to its first issue in 1875.

The Collegian is available at: http://library.willamette.edu./archives/collegian


Oregonian, Birds of North America, Oregon Newspaper Sources

We have just added three excellent resources to our digital collection, in addition to the recent addition of Science: Birds of North America Online, the Oregonian, and the Oregon Newspaper Sources.

bna

 

Birds of North America Online is a database of over 716 species of birds that live and migrate through North America, including Hawaii and Canada.  It includes a multimedia collection for every bird, including top quality audio and videos galleries, and rich collection of article information for each species for pretty much anything you would want to know about a specific bird.  So if your curious what birds you saw outside your window or heard singing, this will be an outstanding resources!

oregonian-bna-newspapers

 

The Oregonian newspaper (ranges from 1987-present).  There is a one day delay, so you won’t be able to read through the current day’s edition. We’ve had very spotty electronic access to recent editions of the Oregonian, but this gives us reliable full text coverage back to 1987.

 

Oregon Newspaper Sources is a collection of 51 of the largest Oregon-based newspapers, including the Statesman Journal newspaper, Oregonian, and Eugene Register-Guard that can be search simultaneously or individually.  You can even browse individual editions of newspapers by sections.


Library Spaces During 2014 Finals

wordle-word-art-4-25-14

We have prepared the library for Finals Week!  Starting April 25th we have extended library hours (click here for details) through Sunday May 11th, including our ever popular free cookies and coffee which are available after 10pm to our fabulous Willamette students.

cookies-coffee-finals-2012cookies
Starting next Wednesday, the Hatfield Room will be temporarily designated as a quiet study space during finals week. This compliments the quiet second floor of the library rule. There are two large whiteboards if you need large writing areas to help you think (two more white boards are located downstairs for group study). We also bring in large tables to spread out your work, and some soft chairs for relaxing.
IMAG0356quiet-space-2013
We have a popular reading collection available downstairs in case you need to break loose from the academic rigor of finals and just enjoy a fun, non-academic book. We will also have a coloring station to let that creativity flow!
IMAG0381_1crayons

Some other things: We have a recording room which might be handy to those who need to practice a presentation or make a recording for a language class.  We have two printers on the second floor, two on the first floor, and one printer in the Fish Bowl in case one of the printers goes down.  We have soft seating scattered around the library for relaxation, and hard wood-backed chairs if you prefer a more solid chair.  And below is a map of the power outlet to keep your laptops and cell phones humming!

We wish you the best throughout your finals!

Outlets 2013