Edible Book Festival, April 1st

Do you like food? Books? How about edible books? The library is hosting its fifth annual Edible Book Festival in the Hatfield Room on April 1st, and you are invited to participate!

“War and Peas” by Alice French

“War and Peas” by Alice French

An edible book is a dish inspired by any book, whether your inspiration be the title, the characters in it, plot points, or really anything. The only limits on your creation are that it must be made of mostly food and must be inspired by a book of some kind. We’ll have an example on display in the library soon, or you can check here for examples and inspiration to get your creativity flowing!

If you find yourself with a brilliant idea, bring your edible book to the Hatfield Room between 8:00am and 1:00pm on April 1st. We are excited to see more of your wonderful creations this year!

Drop off entries by 1pm in the Hatfield Room.

8-1pm and 2-4:30pm – Public voting & viewing times

1-2pm – Judging panel votes

4:30pm – Awards ceremony & light refreshments

Prizes will be awarded for the People’s Choice, the Most Literary, the Most Creative, the Punniest, and the Best Student Entry.

Please contact Carol Drost for any questions at cdrost@willamette.edu (503-370-6715).  The following link opens a PDF poster which contains all of the details of the upcoming event: ediblebooks-poster.pdf

edible-book-festival-2016-lg


Diary of Janette McCalley Stowell

JanetteStowell-Mrs.GeoJanette McCalley was born in Kirkcaldy, Scotland on January 29, 1847. She came to America with her parents in 1851 and the family moved to Salem, Oregon in 1859. Janette McCalley graduated from Willamette University with a B.S. in 1865 and taught for a time in the Preparatory Course at Willamette University. She married George Stowell on February 20, 1870 in Springfield, Oregon. She and George had four children.

By 1888, the Stowell family had moved to Corbett Street in Portland, Oregon. In January, 1890, Janette Stowell began a diary which she kept, in an irregular fashion, until 1906. She died on February 4, 1916, and was survived by her husband, and three of her four children.

Collection Description

Janette McCalley Stowell’s journal retains original order.  It can be viewed at:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:manuscripts/2744/cpd/0/75/0

Janette Stowell was a graduate of Willamette University and a member of the teaching staff at that university before her marriage. Her diary details her family’s life at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth in Portland, Oregon and Sitka, Alaska. She writes of keeping a garden and growing flowers, caring for her children, entertaining friends, going to church and her involvement in a branch of the Chautauqua Institute.

In February of 1890 the Portland area experienced a damaging flood which covered Ross Island and washed away many buildings and homes. Mrs. Stowell describes walking to where the family could see the flood waters covering Ross Island and watching debris pile up at the Ross Island Bridge.

In the late 1890s she joined a reading club and was more involved in growing roses. By 1900, after a break in the diary of two years, she reports the family is in Sitka, Alaska where her husband is working. The final entry in the diary is for August 25, 1906.


Vernor Martin Sackett Negatives, Archives Collection

Vernor Martin Sackett, Photographer

Vernor Martin Sackett, Photographer

The Vernor Martin Sackett Negatives Collection in Willamette’s Archives and Special Collections

This is a collection consists of photograph negatives taken by Vernor Sackett while he was a student at Willamette University and while he was serving in the military in Germany. The image of Willamette University are mainly about student life and activities at Willamette University during the 1920s. Sacket, his future wife Mary Notson, his brother Sheldon Sackett and Sheldon’s future wife Sadie Pratt are all featured. The five cubic feet of images also include trips Sackett made to various places in Oregon and Northern California as well as visits to family and friends. In addition, there are images of Germany taken when Sackett spent time there while serving in the United States Army.

Vernor Martin Sackett was born in Jefferson, Oregon in 1898 and graduated from Willamette University in 1922. Next to his portrait in the school yearbook, The Wallulah is the comment “He owns a whole flock of cameras that won’t eat anything but embarrassing situations. Sings a deep ’sonorous’ bass, sells pictures, trades kodaks….”

Vernon died in 1965, and was survived by his wife, Mary Notson Sackett, sister of Robert Notson.

hunting-expedition-thanksgiving-1919

A Hunting Expedition, Thanksgiving 1919

Chattin-girls-basketball

Girl’s Basketball Player, Chattin

new-lausanne

Lausanne Hall Construction

Fat-Zeller

“Fat” Zeller

squint-dave-flunkies

“Squint” & “Dave,” “Flunkies”

View this collection and the negatives online at:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4979


Escape Fiction Display

escape-from-fiction-wu-reads-displayThroughout the month of January we will have up a display of fiction movies and books from our general collection.  There are classics and newbies to browse through.  The display is located on the first floor of the library, and all materials in it are available to be checked out.

Here are just a few titles that are in the temporary display:

DVDs

Astro Boy
The Mists of Avalon
Alien
Blade Runner
My Brother is from Another Planet
Tales of Earth Sea
Castle in the Sky
Riddick
District 9
Total Recall
Melancholia
Toy Story 3
Minority Report
Invasion of the Body Snatchers

escape-from-fiction-display

BOOKS

Watchmen
Harry Potter
The Lost Heir
The Hunger Games
Ink Heart
Goblin Secrets
Boy, Snow, Bird
300
Cloud Atlas
iRobot
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
The Sword in the Stone
The Hitch Hikers Trilogy
Watership Down

 

 


New Faculty Works Collection

faculty-researchThe Hatfield Library is beginning an exciting new project.  We are collecting digital copies of Willamette faculty research in our Academic Commons.  This includes past and current research papers other works.  It also includes data sets that Willamette Faculty may have created during their research process.

Here is a link to the current collections (click FACULTY RESEARCH on left side of screen): http://libmedia.willamette.edu/commons

Since these collections will be publicly available, faculty need to make sure that their publication contract allows for general public access.  If the faculty member is not sure, they should contact their publisher.  If the publisher does not allow for the final copy to be made publicly available, often times they allow pre-publication drafts instead, so this collection may include a number of pre-publication drafts too.

Once the faculty member has verified that it is okay to include their work in these collections, all you need to do is email a copy of your work to either Bill Kelm (bkelm@willamette.edu) or John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu).  They will upload it for the faculty member.  All Willamette faculty from all departments are encouraged to submit their publications in digital form to be included in these collections, so these collections will grow over time.

This is a wonderful way for faculty to get their publications and research work out there for others to read and use.  Students, current and prospective, may be interested in these works.

For questions about these collections, contact Bill Kelm (bkelm@willamette.edu), Systems Librarian or John Repplinger (jrepplin@willamette.edu), Science Librarian at Willamette University.

Banned Books 2015

banned-bks-2015Banned Books Week for 2015 is held Sept 27-Oct 3. Celebrate your freedom to read by reading a book from our Banned Books display, which will be on display from Sept 25th throughout October on the first floor of the library.  We encourage you to check them out!

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read.  It highlights the value of free and open access to information, and brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

FUN FACTS:

Over this past decade, 5,099 challenges were reported to the Office for Intellectual Freedom. These are the top five reasons…

1,577 challenges due to “sexually explicit” material
1,291 challenges due to “offensive language”
989 challenges due to materials deemed “unsuited to age group”
619 challenged due to “violence”‘
361 challenges due to “homosexuality”
(Source: http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10)

 

2014

The top ten most frequently challenged books last year include:

1)      The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie

Reasons: anti-family, cultural insensitivity, drugs/alcohol/smoking, gambling, offensive language, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group, violence. Additional reasons: “depictions of bullying”

2)      Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

Reasons: gambling, offensive language, political viewpoint. Additional reasons: “politically, racially, and socially offensive,” “graphic depictions”

3)      And Tango Makes Three, Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell

Reasons: Anti-family, homosexuality, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “promotes the homosexual agenda”

4)      The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison

Reasons: Sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “contains controversial issues”

5)      It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris

Reasons: Nudity, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group. Additional reasons: “alleges it child pornography”

6)      Saga, by Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples

Reasons: Anti-Family, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group. Additional reasons:

7)      The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited to age group, violence

8)      The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “date rape and masturbation”

9)      A Stolen Life, Jaycee Dugard

Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group

10)  Drama, by Raina Telgemeier

Reasons: sexually explicit

 

For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week visit the ALA Banned Books web site:

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek

Source: ALA Banned Books web site


Read It Again

Summer time is often a little slower paced academically, but also filled with work and extra curricular activities.  Why not have a book on hand to read between those activities?  And how about re-reading something you enjoyed?

Come get a book or movie from our current “Read It (or watch) Again” collection.  Relive the joy of a favorite book or watch a movie you really enjoyed watching before.  They are located on the first floor of the library.

read-it-again


Willamette University May Weekend Collection

may-pole-danceWillamette University’s first May Day celebration took place in 1909. In the early years, campus literary societies elected and coronated a King and Queen of festivities, participated in intramural athletic competitions, and welcomed alumni back to campus. By the early 1930s the May Court no longer elected a King and consisted of a May Queen and her Attendants. As literary societies were largely defunct by this time, sororities played a much larger role in the voting for Queen.may-day-dinner

In 1970 several of the regular events attached to May Day, or Spring Weekend as it was later called, were dropped due to lack of interest. This included the election of the Spring Weekend court. Willamette then chose to emphasize the academic instead of the social facet of campus life. The event changed shape to become primarily a preview-day for prospective students.

The Willamette University May Weekend collection contains photographs, newspaper clippings, and event programs related to the university’s celebration of May Day. Some of the scenes of May Day depicted include the winding of the May pole, coronation of the May King and Queen, and group dances. Newspaper articles detail the merit of the 1956 May Queen and court. Programs outline the events of the weekend, including activities such as tug-of-war over the mill stream, and theatrical performances.

Originally written by Christopher McFetridge.  View more photos and documents at:

http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4902

 

may-day-court

 


Deadline for $500 MOHL Awards

The MOHL Research Award, sponsored by the Hatfield Library, is awarded for an excellent paper in any subject that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources. Up to two $500 cash prizes may be awarded. Any student paper written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work is eligible to be considered for this award. The paper should have been written in the current academic year, that is, fall 2014/spring 2015.

Note: papers done as a senior project but in the junior year are excluded.

Deadline: all paperwork must be in by the last day of finals, May 13, 2015 at 5:00 p.m.

Details at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/award/


WEDNESDAY!!! Edible Book Festival Reminder

Just a quick reminder about tomorrow’s (Wed) Edible Book Festival!

Grab some food and see what you come up with.  Here are some ideas from the Seattle Public Library’s Edible Book Festival, if you need inspiration:

hunger-games

 

 

 

 

“The Hunger Games”

lord-of-fries

 

 

 

 

“The Lord of the Flies”

the-help

 

 

 

 

“The Help”

scarlet-letter

 

 

 

 

“The Scarlet Letter”

war-peace

 

 

 

 

“War & Peace”

A full description of the event and photos of last year are available at:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2015/02/23/2015-edible-book-festival/