Banned Books 2015

banned-bks-2015Banned Books Week for 2015 is held Sept 27-Oct 3. Celebrate your freedom to read by reading a book from our Banned Books display, which will be on display from Sept 25th throughout October on the first floor of the library.  We encourage you to check them out!

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read.  It highlights the value of free and open access to information, and brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.


Over this past decade, 5,099 challenges were reported to the Office for Intellectual Freedom. These are the top five reasons…

1,577 challenges due to “sexually explicit” material
1,291 challenges due to “offensive language”
989 challenges due to materials deemed “unsuited to age group”
619 challenged due to “violence”‘
361 challenges due to “homosexuality”



The top ten most frequently challenged books last year include:

1)      The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie

Reasons: anti-family, cultural insensitivity, drugs/alcohol/smoking, gambling, offensive language, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group, violence. Additional reasons: “depictions of bullying”

2)      Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

Reasons: gambling, offensive language, political viewpoint. Additional reasons: “politically, racially, and socially offensive,” “graphic depictions”

3)      And Tango Makes Three, Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell

Reasons: Anti-family, homosexuality, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “promotes the homosexual agenda”

4)      The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison

Reasons: Sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “contains controversial issues”

5)      It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris

Reasons: Nudity, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group. Additional reasons: “alleges it child pornography”

6)      Saga, by Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples

Reasons: Anti-Family, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group. Additional reasons:

7)      The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited to age group, violence

8)      The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “date rape and masturbation”

9)      A Stolen Life, Jaycee Dugard

Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group

10)  Drama, by Raina Telgemeier

Reasons: sexually explicit


For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week visit the ALA Banned Books web site:

Source: ALA Banned Books web site

Read It Again

Summer time is often a little slower paced academically, but also filled with work and extra curricular activities.  Why not have a book on hand to read between those activities?  And how about re-reading something you enjoyed?

Come get a book or movie from our current “Read It (or watch) Again” collection.  Relive the joy of a favorite book or watch a movie you really enjoyed watching before.  They are located on the first floor of the library.


Willamette University May Weekend Collection

may-pole-danceWillamette University’s first May Day celebration took place in 1909. In the early years, campus literary societies elected and coronated a King and Queen of festivities, participated in intramural athletic competitions, and welcomed alumni back to campus. By the early 1930s the May Court no longer elected a King and consisted of a May Queen and her Attendants. As literary societies were largely defunct by this time, sororities played a much larger role in the voting for Queen.may-day-dinner

In 1970 several of the regular events attached to May Day, or Spring Weekend as it was later called, were dropped due to lack of interest. This included the election of the Spring Weekend court. Willamette then chose to emphasize the academic instead of the social facet of campus life. The event changed shape to become primarily a preview-day for prospective students.

The Willamette University May Weekend collection contains photographs, newspaper clippings, and event programs related to the university’s celebration of May Day. Some of the scenes of May Day depicted include the winding of the May pole, coronation of the May King and Queen, and group dances. Newspaper articles detail the merit of the 1956 May Queen and court. Programs outline the events of the weekend, including activities such as tug-of-war over the mill stream, and theatrical performances.

Originally written by Christopher McFetridge.  View more photos and documents at:!doc:page:eads/4902




Deadline for $500 MOHL Awards

The MOHL Research Award, sponsored by the Hatfield Library, is awarded for an excellent paper in any subject that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources. Up to two $500 cash prizes may be awarded. Any student paper written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work is eligible to be considered for this award. The paper should have been written in the current academic year, that is, fall 2014/spring 2015.

Note: papers done as a senior project but in the junior year are excluded.

Deadline: all paperwork must be in by the last day of finals, May 13, 2015 at 5:00 p.m.

Details at:

WEDNESDAY!!! Edible Book Festival Reminder

Just a quick reminder about tomorrow’s (Wed) Edible Book Festival!

Grab some food and see what you come up with.  Here are some ideas from the Seattle Public Library’s Edible Book Festival, if you need inspiration:






“The Hunger Games”






“The Lord of the Flies”






“The Help”






“The Scarlet Letter”






“War & Peace”

A full description of the event and photos of last year are available at:

The Rex Amos Papers in the Willamette Archives


Photo by Pete Beattie

Collage artist Rex Amos was born on August 13, 1935 in Wallace, Idaho to Frenche Harland “Bud” Amos and Jean (Johnstone) Amos. Amos was raised in Burke, Idaho, moving with his parents and brother, Clinton, to Portland, Oregon around the age of seven. Amos graduated from Washington High School in 1953 and was drafted into the U.S. Army shortly thereafter. Having grown up near Mt. Hood, Amos’s first choice would have been to be on the Army ski patrol, but instead he served as a machine gunner in the infantry from 1954 to 1956 because of his excellent marksmanship. Upon Amos’s return from the Army, his father made two attempts on Amos’s life. These assaults by his father continued a pattern of abuse, which had been prevalent throughout Amos’s childhood. To break the cycle of violence that had been visited upon the family, Amos moved his mother to a flat in Southeast Portland. It was there he met his future wife, Diane Smith.

In around 1960 Amos, Diane, and his mother Jean moved to The Village, a neighborhood in Southwest Portland full of musicians, writers, and artists. There Amos’s creativity blossomed. A jazz drummer at this time, he broke the world record for marathon drumming, playing for 82 hours. When the musicians union revoked his union card for playing this unsanctioned job, Amos moved to Big Sur, California, with friend Ron Marcus. He and Marcus worked at the Big Sur Inn and lived in a shack under a bridge. It was there Amos found his passion for creating art. Having little money for supplies, Amos began creating assemblages from materials he found in the area. At the time, Amos considered his work more an expression of political and social critique than an aesthetic creation.

Prior to this, Amos had begun studying at Portland State University (PSU) majoring in philosophy and literature and was awarded his B. S. in 1969. In the midst of his study, he befriended PSU philosophy professor Dr. Graham P. Conroy. While a student, Amos conceived and named the philosophy of Preliminism in the early 1960s. He then gave Preliminism to Conroy because Conroy deemed the giving of philosophy impossible.

After moving to a large house behind a dry cleaners on S. W. 11th and Montgomery near Portland State, Amos was able to obtain a dump license which made it possible for him to collect materials for assemblages. On a trip to New York City with friend Greg Stone in 1961, Amos visited the Museum of Modern Art and saw “The Art of Assemblage” exhibit where he was amazed to discover that he had been creating works similar to those on display.

When the city stopped issuing dump licenses, Amos turned to paper as a medium of expression. He gained much of his artistic training and inspiration through practice and by studying other artists. Meeting the painter Matt Glavin, who was teaching at UC Berkeley, transformed Amos’s vision. Glavin introduced him to the process of chine collé and made it possible for him to use the facilities at Magnolia Editions. Amos has continued to work in assemblage as well as in various forms of collage.

A signature of Amos’s collages are the images he uses, which are meticulously cut from published materials using scissors intended for eye surgery – a process that has earned him the moniker “The Cutter.” Amos then carefully selects from thousands of these images to create detailed collages infused with literary, historical, religious, and philosophical allusions. Amos’s collages have been featured in galleries and museums such as the Portland Art Museum, Magnolia Editions, the Corvallis Art Center, the 12×16 Gallery, and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Many of these are in the style of chine collé, which is a combination of collage and print-making techniques.

After more than 50 years in Portland, Amos and Diane, a retired secondary school English teacher, now live in Cannon Beach, Oregon. For more information on Amos, visit his website.

Content Description

The Rex Amos papers are a collection of artwork, journals and diaries, biographical material, correspondence, photographs, and writings compiled by Amos. The collection also contains an oral history interview conducted with Amos in 2014. A wealth of information about Amos’s life can be found in his correspondence and writings gathered largely from the mid-1950s to the 2010s. He documents his challenging childhood, his feelings about contemporary events, and the trials of friends and family’s diseases, deaths, and suicides. Amos’s oral history provides context to his papers and to his artwork. His correspondence reveals information about his own life as well as of the lives of those with whom he is writing, giving a unique look at life in Oregon and California through the second half of the twentieth century. There is video, newspaper, and Amos’s written documentation of his care for his mother, Jean, while she had Alzheimer’s disease. The Rex Amos papers represent Amos’s lifetime as an artist: as an extra in Paint Your Wagon; as a jazz drummer in Portland; as an assemblage artist of materials near his home in Big Sur, California; as a collage artist creating ‘gutterscapes’ from scraps of used paper; to a collage artist creating chine collé for art galleries and museums in Oregon and California.

These papers also represent Amos’s life as a philosopher. Amos conceived and named the philosophy of Preliminism, the theory and practice of practice. Preliminism is represented throughout Amos’s papers, mentioned in correspondence, in his writing and referenced in news articles related to his work. His papers also reflect his life as a fly fisherman, clammer, and overall outdoorsman.

Along with Amos’s own materials are those that he has gathered about friends and other Pacific Northwest artists. These include artwork, books, photographs, video, and writings of Amos’s family and many area artists. Amos’s wife, Diane, assisted in the organization and appraisal of the materials, adding context to much of the materials and many of the people featured in the papers. The Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University has a collection of Amos’s artwork.

This information was originally written by Ashley Toutain, Processing Archivist and Records Manager at the Mark O. Hatfield Library for the Rex Amos papers collection. For additional info, visit:!doc:page:eads/4231

The source of the images below come from:


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The Mark O. Hatfield Library invites you to participate in the fourth annual EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!

Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Hatfield Room.edible-books-2015

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

Some of last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle Public Library and Duke University, or check out flickr. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Free to enter– no registration required. Drop off your entry in the Hatfield Room on March 11 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book until 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

All entries will be on display from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Even if you don’t enter, you can cast a vote for your favorite edible book. At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges– Mike Chasar (English), Karen Wood (University Chaplain), and Kaitlen McPherson (CLA student) — will announce the prizes for:

Best Student Entry

Most Literary

Most Creative


People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners. To view all photos of last year’s entries, go to:

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715,

Last year’s winners:

Award Winners
war-and-peas2 “War and Peas”

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
People’s Choice
pitcher-dory-gray “Pitcher of Dory in Gray

Created by Emily Wetherford
Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s
Portrait of Dorian Gray”
Best Student Entry
dune He Who Controls the
Spice Controls the Universe

Created by Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by Frank Herbert’s
Most Creative
war-and-peas War and Peas

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Most Literary
wholey-bible2 The Hole-y Bible

Created by Anna Corner
Inspired by “The Holy Bible”

Student Publications Collection

student-publications-collThe Willamette University Archives has recently released a new collection called the Student Publications collection.  The Student Publications collection includes literary publications, magazines, newsletters, and newspapers created by Willamette University student organizations and groups. Included are the long-running school newspaper The Collegian; the student yearbook, The Wallulah; the Tokyo International University of America yearbook; literary journals; and comedic magazines. Among the newspapers and newsletters are those published at odds with, or in addition to, The Collegian such as Another Voice, The Mill Stream and The Vanguard. In addition to newspapers, Willamette University students have compiled literary magazines, fraternity and sorority publications, and comedic newsletters. The collection ranges between 1850-2014, and has 27.5 linear feet, including files, one oversize box, bound volumes, and digital materials.

A historical note: Individual students, organizations and groups have been gathering and writing since Willamette’s founding. The first known publication, The Experiment, was created in 1850 as a way for students of the Oregon Institute to express themselves. Willamette’s longest running student publication, The Collegian, was begun in 1875. It continues to document the campus climate, events, and students’ reactions to their surroundings.

Contact Ashley Toutain ( for more information about this collection, or click here to read more of what she wrote:!doc:page:eads/4010/cpd/0/75/0


Your Subject Specialist Librarians

As juniors and seniors, you will research and write more than past semesters.  If you haven’t met with a librarian yet to help with your research, now is an awesome time to get to know them!  Faculty may also wish to contact them for a library instruction session for your class.

They are all very knowledgeable and friendly.  You will see them at the reference desk where you can ask for research help, or set up a time to meet with them one-on-one.

gary_sm Gary Klein
Management & Economics Librarian

Specialty Areas:

john_sm John Repplinger
Science Librarian
Web Page

Specialty Areas:

joni_sm Joni Roberts
Associate University Librarian for Public Services and Collection Development

Specialty Areas:

ford_sm Ford Schmidt
Head of Research Services

Specialty Areas:

bonzai Doreen Simonsen
Humanities and Fine Arts Librarian

Specialty Areas:

carol_sm Carol Drost
Associate University Librarian for Technical Services

Specialty Areas:



Annual Tree of Giving 2014

treegiving1Items are starting to come in already for the Tree of Giving Book Drive!  We are supporting both Grant and Bush Elementary schools this year, so we are looking forward to strong community support and abundant book donations. Some key things to remember as we approach the final Drive date on December 17th:

– 25% discount at the Willamette Store for Book Drive books

– K-5 Spanish and English language books are needed

– No holiday-themed books, please

– Gloves, hats, and cash for books are also desired

– Drop off locations include the Circulation Desk in the Hatfield Library, the Willamette Store, and the Sparks Center

– For more info visit:

Please visit our Tree of Giving located near the entrance of the library, and see the beautiful ornaments adorning it.  For every book donated, we will add one ornament to the tree.

So think of the Book Drive as you do your Black Friday shopping!  The Mark O. Hatfield Library, Willamette Store, and Student-Athlete Advisory Committee thanks you for your support.