Faculty Colloquium, Ivan Welty

Please join us this Friday, September 16th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Ivan Welty, Associate Professor of Philosophy

Title: My Semester in Hanoi

Abstract: Last year I spent 6 months in Hanoi as a Fulbright US Scholar. In this talk, I’ll describe the experience, concentrating on (1) the current scene in Vietnam as I came to understand it; (2) tips for colleagues weighing their own Fulbright applications, including practical matters like housing and children’s schooling; and (3) possibilities for future collaboration and exchange with partners in Vietnam. So my aim is both to report my experience and to arouse interest at Willamette in Fulbright and Vietnam.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.


Newly-Emerging Technologies and the Future of Humanity

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us tomorrow, Friday, September 9th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our first Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Govindan Parayil, Mark and Melody Teppola Presidential Distinguished Visiting Professor

Title: Newly-Emerging Technologies and the Future of HumanityGovindan Parayil

Abstract: Recent advances in biological, computer and material sciences have made many thinkers to revisit the age-old warnings about the dangers of run-way technological change. This, in addition to the threat to all life on earth due to run away climate change, adds to the doomsday scenario. Computer pioneer Bill Joy’s famous article, “Why the Future Doesn’t Need Us” in WIRED magazine is getting renewed attention with a slew of books and articles about the threat to humanity’ future (see for example books by Nick Bostrom, Yuval Harari and others) due to advances in biotechnology and artificial intelligence. In this lecture I will go over these issues and see if humanity’s future is, indeed, doomed as claimed. I will argue that, yes, we must be concerned, but the “post-human” tomorrow waiting for us should be least of our worries when we should be worried about global poverty, increasing inequality, civil wars, and environmental problems.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: What I Learned in Prison

Dear Colleagues, buissm
Please join us this Friday, April 29th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our eleventh and final Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Melissa Buis Michaux, Associate Professor of Politics

Title: What I Learned in Prison

Abstract:  The United States currently incarcerates about 2.4 million men, women and children.  The number of incarcerated does not take into account how many people’s lives are touched by our extensive system of punishment, including those on parole or probation; children of incarcerated parents; and communities that support prison systems.  Furthermore, racial disparities in arrests, sentencing, and prison time call into question our guarantees of equal justice and fundamental fairness.  Inside the prison walls, many prisoners are subject to a system of control that prioritizes punishment over rehabilitation.  All of this I knew before I stepped inside a prison.  Come hear what I learned—about prison, the people behind the walls, and myself—once I went inside.  I will also be joined by some students from my “Reforming Criminal Justice” class that has been going inside the Oregon State Penitentiary this semester and working alongside prisoners.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.
Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Injuring Yourself to Better Health: How Exercise Improves Cardiovascular

lockardsmDear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 22nd at 3 pm. in Collins 205 for our tenth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Michael Lockard, Associate Professor of Exercise Science

Title: Injuring Yourself to Better Health: How Exercise Improves Cardiovascular Health

Abstract:  Regular aerobic activity has long been associated with improved cardiovascular health and decreased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease.  While aerobic exercise training has been repeatedly associated with improvements in risk factors associated with CVD, it appears that training results in an additional reduction in risk independent of the more conventional risk factor.  It has been suggested that a causal link between regular physical activity and reduced CVD risk is mediated through the improvement of endothelial health and associated vascular function.  To this date, however, a specific mechanism for linking the repeated act of exercising and improvement in vascular function has not been established.  It is the goal of this research to elucidate the details of this mechanism.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: La Maldad de Martin Wong: Approximating Nuyorico

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 15th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.Roy Perez

Roy Perez, Assistant Professor of English and American Ethnic Studies

Title: La Maldad de Martin Wong: Approximating Nuyorico

Abstract: Nicknamed “Chino Malo,” gay Chinese-American painter and art collector Martin Wong lived in Manhattan’s Lower East Side in the 1980s, where he circulated among and collaborated with a number of Puerto Rican artists and writers. In this talk, I explore how Wong’s proximity to Nuyorican (Puerto Rican New York) culture appears in and shapes his paintings. I also examine Martin Wong’s presence as a queer Asian American painter in the popular history of Latina/o arts and culture. Often depicting men of color in erotic positions and encounters, Wong’s paintings lurk on the margin of accepted Latino art history, challenging typical representations of Latino masculinity. What happens when we move Wong to the center of Latino art and cultural history? What does Wong’s vision of Nuyorico reveal to us about its people, landscape, and culture? I contend that Wong’s visual poetics enact a series of queer advances that unsettle Nuyorico’s “good” center. Mal movement or comportment—to defer fear of committing maldades and willfully do things badly, wrongly, or approximately—loosens racial identity practices from their toil toward completion and full knowing.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: The Alexander Technique

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 8th at 3 pm. in the Room 145 of Fine Arts West (Use West Entrance that faces Goudy Hall) for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.Anita King

Anita King, Professor of Music Emerita, Piano

Title: The Alexander Technique: How Our Daily Activities Can Make Us Freer!

Abstract: The Alexander Technique is a simple and practical method for improving ease and freedom of movement, balance, support, and improved coordination. Practice of the Technique refines and heightens kinesthetic sensitivity, offering people a fluid and lively control of their movement. It provides a means whereby the use of a part–a voice or an arm or a leg–is improved by improving the use of the whole body, indeed, the whole self. These benefits are accomplished through a process of self-observation where one becomes intimately aware of one’s movement habits so that one can suspend habitual, often unconscious, muscular tightening where it exists and gradually, consciously, replace it with constructive behavior.

I will lead participants in explorations and activities designed to shed light on several topics related to coordinate movement (and yes, sitting, standing and speaking are movement activities!). These include: becoming more fully embodied by waking up the tactile and kinesthetic senses; sitting and standing with ease by taking full advantage of the weight-bearing capacity of the bony structure; maintaining full-stature by eliminating the distorting effects of unnecessary muscular effort (tension); avoiding isolation and overworking of individual parts by keeping them in continuous relation to the whole body.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Liquid Sky, Faculty Colloquium by Chuck Williamson

williamsonsm

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 1st at 3 pm. in the Kremer Board Room (FORD 102) for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Chuck Williamson, Professor of Chemistry
 

Title: Liquid Sky: Liquid-Liquid Mixtures, Light Scattering, and Critical Behavior

Abstract:  The romance of a bottle of wine and a technicolor sunset – perhaps the perfect pairing of a liquid-liquid mixture with light scattering phenomena. This talk will strive for a second-best pairing by showing how light scattering may be used to understand the physical properties of liquid-liquid mixtures. At first glance, pouring two nonreactive liquids together to make a mixture seems like a very simple physical process. Sometimes two liquids mix completely, like ethanol and water do in alcoholic beverages. Sometimes the liquids stay in two layers and do not mix very much at all, like oil and water. However, many pairs of liquids show both types of behavior: the liquids mix completely for some temperatures and some mixing ratios, but the liquids separate into two layers at other conditions. In this talk I will discuss the laser light scattering method we use to make maps of the exact conditions in which two liquids mix to form a single layer, or phase. I will introduce special points on the maps called critical points, and show the universal and beautiful physical behavior that all liquid-liquid mixtures exhibit at a critical point, like critical opalescence and spinodal decomposition. I will also present a new type of fundamental liquid-liquid phase behavior my students and I have observed here at Willamette. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the complex ways in which light can scatter from a liquid-liquid mixture by incorporating examples of light scattering found in the atmosphere, such as the whiteness of clouds and fog, the blueness of the sky, and solar halos. There is also a brief shout out to Edvard Munch.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Bacteria Get Sick, Too

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, March 11th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Melissa Marks, Assistant Professor of BiologyMelissa Marks

Title: Bacteria Get Sick, Too: The Influence of Cell Surface Structure on Bacterial Avoidance of Viral Infection

Abstract:

All living things encounter challenges that can affect their survival and persistence in the environment. For bacteria, a significant source of this stress comes in the form of lethal bacteriophage (viral) infection. Because bacteriophage in the environment greatly outnumber bacteria, these infections present a significant threat to survival for bacterial cells and populations. In the freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, production of complex external polysaccharides (EPS) obscures the physical phage binding sites and prevents phage attachment and infection. In this talk I will discuss the approaches my students and I used to identify several genes required for biosynthesis of the EPS and to measure how the presence of EPS allows cells to evade phage attack.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

PS: Our next presentation will be on Friday, April 1st


Faculty Colloquium by Cecily McCaffrey

cecily-mccaffreyDear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, March 4th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our fifth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Cecily McCaffrey, Associate Professor of History
 

Title: Wang Sanhuai and the Jiaqing Emperor: A Study in Political Dialogue

Abstract:
Wang Sanhuai was a prominent rebel leader of the White Lotus Uprisings (1796-1804) in Sichuan province, China. Wang and his band resisted state authority and evaded arrest for two years. During that time, Wang and his fellows made a mockery of imperial policies of pacification that rewarded loyal subjects: for example, in an episode recounted in the Qing shi gao, Wang petitioned for surrender as a ploy to facilitate an ambush against Qing military forces. However, when he was finally captured, Wang played the role of penitent, claiming that he had wished to surrender all along. This talk examines Wang’s depositions and official reports of his conduct as evidence of non-elite political maneuvering. When read against the grain of court rhetoric, Wang’s testimony and actions suggest not only that he had a perspicacious command of imperial policy but also that he attempted to engage officers of the court on their own terms as he negotiated for his life. Although Wang did not survive, his arguments were not without effect: references to Wang’s testimony surface in the Jiaqing emperor’s edicts discussing the evolution of state pacification policies in the months following Wang’s arrest. Taking Wang Sanhuai as one example, this talk argues for increased recognition of the role and influence of non-elite subjects in the constitution and evolution of the state-society relationship in Qing China.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Saint-making and Map-making

francavigliaDear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, February 26th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our fourth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Richard Francaviglia, Professor Emeritus of History and Geography
 

Title: Saint-making and Map-making: The Cartographic History of Mormonism

Abstract:
This lecture will explore the fascinating and enduring connection between Mormonism and maps. From the first “City of Zion” plat map in the early 1830s to the most modern cartography showing the worldwide distribution of Latter-day Saints, Mormonism has relied on maps to promote and sustain the faith. This lecture will showcase about a dozen maps that cover important themes in Mormon history, including bringing order to the western American wilderness, portraying locations described in the Book of Mormon, and mapping the territories served by missionaries at home and abroad.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators