Faculty Colloquia for Spring

Dear Colleagues,

The Faculty Colloquium presentations for this semester have come to an end.  Karen Arabas’ previously scheduled presentation on “Ecological Restoration Work at Zena Forest” has been moved from this coming Friday to February 13th.  Please mark your calendars and join us to hear the intriguing presentations of your colleagues work next Semester.

Time and place:  Friday afternoons at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room.

Refreshments will be served

Spring Semester:

Jan. 30:  Josh Laison: “My Friends the Triangles: The Study of Geometric Networks”

Feb. 6:  Marva Duerksen: “Prosody in Emily Dickinson, and in Musical Settings of her Poems”

Feb. 13:  Karen Arabas:  “Ecological Restoration Work at Zena Forest”

Feb. 27:  Kelley Strawn:  “What’s Behind All This ‘Nones’-Sense? – Examining Religious Non-Affiliation in the United States Over Time”

Mar. 6:  Holland Phillips:  “Echoes of the Danish Folkelig Tradition in Carl Nielsen’s Op. 48.”

Mar. 13:  Bill Duvall:  “Unexpected Writing from an Engaged Intellectual: Ahmed Kalouaz and Adolescent Literature.”

Apr. 3:  Bobby Brewer-Wallin:  “My Case Is Altered or Bodies of Elizabeth: Code-switching in Solo Performance”

Apr. 10:  Abigail Susik: “Surrealism, Stenography and the Ouija Board”

Apr. 24:  Panel on “How Your Research influences Your Teaching”  (Followed by a Reception to celebrate another year of research and excellent teaching)

Sincerely,
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators,

Doreen Simonsen

James Miley


Improvised Music and Dance: “Noru Ka Soru Ka”

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, November 14th at 3:00 pm in FORD 122 for the seventh Faculty Colloquium of this year. (Please note the change of location).

Our speaker will be: Mike Nord, Associate Professor of Music Technology and Music Education

Title: Improvised Music and Dance: Noru Ka Soru Ka and Other New WorkNoru Ka Soru Ka

Abstract: Noru Ka Soru Ka is an international dance-theater and music ensemble featuring Japanese dancers Mao Arata and Makoto Matsushima (also voice), American Mike Nord on guitar and electronics, and Swiss percussionist Georg Hofmann. Friday’s colloquium will present the ensemble’s approach to collective improvisation and feature video recordings of recent performances in the US, Switzerland, and Hong Kong, along with material from a 2013 CD release.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


An Analysis of “Savage Love” Advice Columns

Please join us this Friday, November 7th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fifth Faculty Colloquium of this year. Treats will be provided to accompany this talk.

Professor Jade Aguilar from Willamette University’s Department of Sociology will present

Title: An Analysis of “Savage Love” Advice Columns.
Jade Aguilar
This presentation examines how the popular advice column, Savage Love, gives its readers mixed messages about a particular sexual act performed by heterosexual couples. Broadly, this presentation will investigate the question “does [this] act (de) stabilize heterosexual identity or, more broadly, heteronormativity?” While much work has been done investigating how “queerness” serves as a destabilizing force, heterosexuality,…has been largely ignored.


Faculty Colloquium: The Haunting Resurrection of Spanish Silent Cinema

Please join us this Friday, October 31st at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fifth Faculty Colloquium of this year. Treats will be provided to accompany this Halloween related talk.

Our speaker will be: Anna Cox, Assistant Professor, Spanish and Film Studies

Title: The Haunting Resurrection of Spanish Silent Cinema in Pablo Berger’s Blancanieves/Snow White (2012)

Abstract: Pablo Berger’s Blancanieves/Snow White (2012) retells the Brothers Grimm’s fairytale in the form of a black-and-white silent movie set in 1920s Spain. Berger’s project is a revival of time and place. In the digital age, it participates in the resurrection of early cinematic practices by filmmakers in and out of Hollywood. In Spain, it joins cultural production grappling with identity and “haunting” memory.Haunting

In this interactive presentation, I propose that the movie’s core theme is Spanish national instability, not just in the period depicted, but through time as it is represented in the movie’s reiterative imagery and sound. I argue that this way of engaging with the movie unlocks its cathartic potential for several generations of Spaniards.

DVD available at Mark O. Hatfield Library AV Video (DVD) (PN1995.9.S5 B5833 2013).

We look forward to seeing you there.


Rising to the Climate Challenge

Please join us this Friday, October 24th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fourth Faculty Colloquium of this year.

Our speaker will be:

Sue Koger, Professor of Psychology

Title: Rising to the Climate Challenge: Insights from Psychological Research

Sue Koger

Abstract: Despite increasing societal rhetoric about environmental sustainability, many relevant behaviors remain unchanged. I argue that this is because effective and sustainable solutions to climate change and other “environmental” problems require an understanding of the human (i.e., psychological) influences that created the problems in the first place, and that maintain the status quo. In this talk, I’ll describe some of the barriers to change, as well as strategies for overcoming them — both as individuals and collectively.


Francaviglia: Did Muslims Arrive in the Americas Before Columbus?

Please join us this Friday, October 10th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the third Faculty Colloquium of this year.

Speaker: Richard Francaviglia, Visiting Faculty, Department of Religious Studies

Francaviglia

Title: Did Muslims Arrive in the Americas Before Columbus? Re-examining a Controversial Premise.

Abstract: The claim that Muslims reached, explored, and even settled the New World before Columbus has been debated for nearly a century. After summarizing the claims made by proponents of this view, as found in their books, magazine articles, and Websites, one regional case study will be highlighted. According to proponents, early Southwestern Native American pueblo architecture, petroglyphs, and place names of the “Anasazi” peoples offer clear evidence of Islam’s early presence. This claim not only challenges Native Americans’ beliefs, but is also in disagreement with the consensus of archaeologists and historians of discovery.

Given the complexity of this issue, this presentation recommends viewing the proponents’ claims differently — not [only] in light of science and objectivity, but also as subjective modern narratives about accomplishments in the “Golden Age” of Islam (ca. 750 to 1258 CE). Interestingly, claims about a Pre-Columbian Muslim presence are similar in design to claims by Afro centrists, and both have a similar sociopolitical dimension in that they serve to unify their advocates. Ultimately, though, religion rather than race is a major component of the pre-Columbian Muslim claims. Since 9/11 2001, when Islam began to redouble its efforts to validate its presence in the Americas, the narratives have become decidedly political. Ultimately, the claims of proponents are revisionist and challenge the established way of understanding and celebrating [American] history. If what proponents claim is true, the ramifications would be enormous: it would not only mean that Muslims essentially trumped the European Age of Discovery, but also that Islam in effect predates Christianity and Judaism in the New World. Small wonder, then, that this subject is so controversial and so passionately debated.


Ortwin Knorr & Puppy Love Faculty Colloquium

Ortwin KnorrPlease join us this Friday, October 3rd at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the second Faculty Colloquium of this academic year.

Our speaker will be:  Ortwin Knorr, Associate Professor of Classics
Title: Extreme Puppy Love in Martial 1.109

Abstract: 

Martial’s humorous praise song on the cute little dog Issa in Epigram 1.109 is a favorite among dog lovers and Latin textbook authors alike. Scholars have treated it as an “elegant compliment to a patron” (Fitzgerald  2007:185; cf. Sullivan1991:20: “written in pursuit of patronage”).

Such readings, however, overlook several red flags that suggest a very different type of content. In the very first line, e.g., Martial boasts that his Issa is “naughtier than Catullus’ sparrow”, that is, naughtier than the famous poem by Catullus (c. 2), in which the poet observes his beloved playing sexually suggestive games with her pet sparrow. Moreover, Martial’s praise for Issa in the first three lines of the poem is couched in terms of a “subtle erotic ambiguity” (Citroni 334). And finally, the alleged patron, like other victims of Martial’s invective, bears a suspiciously generic Roman first name, Publius, so that it is impossible to identify him with anyone in particular.

A closer examination of Martial’s Issa epigram will show that the poem cleverly uses the themes and vocabulary of elegiac poetry to lampoon both Issa’s owner as a man who loves his puppy a bit too much and the reader as someone who similarly struggles to decide whether Issa is a dog or a sexually attractive girl.

We look forward to seeing you there.


Faculty Colloquium: Art & Science in Cacadu

Please join us this Friday, September 19th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the first Faculty Colloquium of this year. Our speaker will be Andries Fourie, Associate Professor of Art, speaking on Art & Science in Cacadu. FourieHis talk will focus on his recent mixed-media paintings and sculptures that examine the ecosystems, history and anthropology of the Cacadu District of South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province.

The work, which was produced in response to research conducted in South Africa in collaboration with Dr. David Craig of Willamette’s Biology Department and Dr. Richard Cowling of the Botany Department of the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, explores the relationships between humans, animals and plants in Cacadu’s unusually diverse ecosystems. Cacadu is home to five of South Africa’s eight vegetation biomes, including the very unique thicket biome. Besides its ecological focus, the work attempts to come to a deeper and more holistic understanding of this unique place through an exploration of issues surrounding memory, identity and the notion of belonging.


Oregon Professors of the Year

As a fitting conclusion to the academic year, please join us for the final Faculty Colloquium, tomorrow, Friday, April 25, from 3-4 p.m. (please note the later starting time) in Ford Hall, Room 122.

The final faculty colloquium of this academic year features our current and former Oregon Professors of the Year, talking about–what else?–teaching. Professors Sammy Basu (Politics), Richard Ellis (Politics), Jerry Gray (Economics), Karen Holman (Chemistry), Frances Chapple (Emerita, Chemistry), and Roger Hull (Emeritus, Art History) will reflect on their experiences in the classroom at Willamette: what worked, what they learned, what they’re doing now, and what they might do in the future. . . .  (For all of Willamette’s Oregon Professors of the Years, visit http://www.willamette.edu/about/recognition/professor_of_the_year/)

This celebration of great teaching in the College of Liberal Arts will be followed by a reception in Ford Hall, Room 102 hosted by AVAA and University Librarian Deborah Dancik and the Office for Faculty Research and Resources.

Please join us for what we anticipate will be an engaging, even enlightening, few hours of reflection, conversation, and fun in Willamette’s newest academic building dedicated to teaching and learning.

Friday, April 25, Ford Hall, Room 122
Faculty Colloquium
3-4 p.m. Oregon Professors of the Year
4-6 p.m. Reception

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Patricia Alley, Associate Director
Office for Faculty Research and Resources.

 

Sammy Basu Karen Holman Jerry Grey Richard Ellis Frances ChappleRoger Hull

Laughing into the Abyss: Comedy’s Existential Howl

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 11th at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium.

Our speaker will be:

Scott Nadelson, Assistant Professor of English; Hallie Ford Chair in Writing

Title: Laughing into the Abyss: Comedy’s Existential Howlnadelson_sm

Abstract: This talk on the craft and process of narrative writing explores the relationship between comedy and lamentation. I examine work by the Coen brothers, Nikolai Gogol, and Penelope Fitzgerald—with diversions to Lenny Bruce, Sarah Silverman, Richard Pryor, and The Office—to understand how writers use comedy to wrestle with the complexities of mortality, grief, faith, and compassion. I also discuss how comedy has played a role in my own recent work.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators