Results from the Edible Book Festival, 2013

Second Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our second annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 15th, 2013, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. There were nearly twice as many entries this year, so a big thank you goes to all of our participants.  The Statesman Journal also provided wonderful photos of the exhibits and even a video interview of how Kimberly Miller and her collaborators created “The Monster Book of Monsters”  in the March 15th edition of the newspaper. Below are photos of the entries, the winners, and photos during the judging and awards ceremony.

 

Prizes awarded:

  • People’s Choice – “The Monster Book of Monsters” by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman.
  • Best Student Entry – “One Cake to Rule Them All” by Kelsey Kinavey.
  • Most Creative – “Lord of Pies” by Kelly Slaughter.
  • Most Literary – (Tie) “The Picture of Dorian Souffle” by Maureen Ricks; “Lay’s Miserables” by Katie Mariman.
  • Punniest – (Three-way tie) “Their Fries Were Watching Cod” by Sophie Hearn; “Their Eyes Were Watching Cod” by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar; “Pride and Prego Dish” by Liz Butterfield. 
  • Honorable Mention – “Hop on Pop” by Sara Amato.

 

“The Monster Book of Monsters”

Inspired by Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
By J.K. Rowling
Created by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman

People’s Choice

“One Cake to Rule Them All”

Inspired by The Lord of the Rings By JRR Tolkein
Created by Kelsey Kinavey

Best Student Entry

  “Lord of the Pies”

Inspired by Lord of the Flies
By William Golding
Created by Kelly Slaughter

Most Creative

  The Picture of Dorian Souffle

Inspired by The Picture of Dorian Gray
By Oscar Wilde
Created by Maureen Ricks

(Tie) Most Literary

 

  Lay’s Miserables

Inspired by Les Miserables
By Victor Hugo
Created by Katie Mariman

(Tie) Most Literary

 

Their Fries Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Sophie Hearn

(Tie) Punniest

 

  Their Eyes Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar

(Tie) Punniest

Pride and Prego Dish

Inspired by Pride and Prejudice
By Jane Austen
Created by Liz Butterfield

(Tie) Punniest

 

  Hop on Pop

Inspired by Hop on Pop
By Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel)
Created by Sara Amato

Honorable Mention

  “Hairy Potato”

Inspired by Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
By J.K. Rowling
Created by Amy Amato
  “The Marshmallowship of the Ring”

Inspired by The Fellowship of the Ring
By JRR Tolkein
Created by Victoria Binning
“Sylvia”

Inspired by Birthday Letters
By Ted Hughes
Created by Carol Drost
  “Clementine’s Letter”

Inspired by Clementine’s Letter
By Sara Pennypacker
Created by Mary, Ruby, & Hoy McRobinson
  “The Big Two-Hearted River”

Inspired by The Big Two-Hearted River
By Ernest Hemingway
Created by Sage Townsend
  “The Cats’ Table”

Inspired by The Cat’s Table
By Michael Ondaatje
Created by Joni Roberts
  “The Count of Monte Crisco”

Inspired by The Count of Monte Cristo
By  Alexandre Dumas
Created by John Repplinger
  “Oscar Meyer’s Salami”

Inspired by Salome
By Oscar Wilde
Created by Saran Walker
  “To Grill a Mockingbird”

Inspired by To Kill a Mocking Bird
By Harper Lee
Created by Emma Jonas
  “Pages Coming to Life – Jungle Book”

Inspired by Jungle Book
By Rudyard Kipling
Created by Leslie Whitaker
“Olive R Twist”

Inspired by Oliver Twist
By Charles Dickens
Created by Leslie Whitaker
  “Holes”

Inspired by Holes
By Louis Sachar
Created by Allison Boltwood

Viewing and Judging the Exhibits

 
 
 
 
 
 

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

 


Faculty Colloquium: From Clay to Music

Title: “From Clay to Music: Making and Playing a 7000-Year-Old Xun Musical Instrument”

Presenters: Juwen Zhang, Dept. of Japanese & Chinese / Heidi Preuss Grew, Art Department

Date/Time: Friday March 15, 2013, 3:00 PM

Location: Room 212, Art Building

Abstract:

The xun (塤; xūn) is a Chinese globular flute made of fired clay. It is one of the oldest Chinese instruments with a history of over 7,000 years. This presentation will discuss why the xun was essential to Chinese cosmology and cultural values, how it has become a core marker in the construction of Chinese national identity, and why the instrument has recently been revived in China and in the United States in Salem, Oregon. Guests to the lecture will see and hear the pieces Prof. Grew and Prof. Zhang made together that push the traditional xun form into artistic representations of the earth, the heavens, and animals. Willamette students will also participate in the musical presentation from these creations. “The xun replica Juwen Zhang first brought to the ceramics studio was a modest, egg shaped form,” Professor of Art Heidi Grew recalls, “but the audible projection from that humble object was simply remarkable. The entire atmosphere of the studio dramatically changed with its penetrating sound. Those gathered were silenced, transfixed, and transported to another place. We were in China.” Thus began the ongoing collaboration between two faculty members from the Art Department and Department of Japanese and Chinese. We look forward to sharing this work with the Willamette community.

As always, light refreshments will be provided. See you on Friday.

Bill Kelm and Stasinos Stavrianeas
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Edible Book Festival, March 15, 2013

YOU ARE INVITED TO PARTICIPATE IN THE
SECOND ANNUAL EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!!!!

Friday, March 15, 2013

Hatfield Room
Mark O. Hatfield Library

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

 

Last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle, University of Puget Sound, and Duke University. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Drop off your entries in the Hatfield Room on March 15 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book– all entries will be on view until 4:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—Mike Chasar (English), Hannah Elder (CLA ’13), Honey Wilson (President’s Office)—will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Student Entry
  • Most Literary
  • Most Creative
  • Punniest
  • People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners.

For questions, contact Carol Drost, 370-6715
cdrost@willamette.edu

 

The Exhibits

“Tortilla Flat”

Inspired by
Tortilla Flat
By John Steinbeck
Created by
Leslie Whitaker

“Heart of Darkness”

Inspired by
Heart of Darkness
By Joseph Conrad
Created by
Joni Roberts

“Swiss Family Rubinson”

Inspired by
Swiss Family Robinson
Created by
Carol Drost

“The Invisible Flan”

Inspired by
The Invisible Man
By H.G. Wells
Created by
Saran Walker

“The Invisible Jam”

Inspired by
The Invisible Man
By H.G. Wells
Created by
Robert Minato

“Spuds in Your Eye”

Inspired by
Suds in Your Eye
By Mary Lasswell
Created by
Alice French
“Jane Pear”

Inspired by
Jane Eyre
By Charlotte Bronte
Created by
Liz Butterfield
“Jack & the
Jelly Bean Stalk”

Inspired by
Jack & the
Bean Stalk
By Steven Kellogg
Created by
John Repplinger
“Game of Scones”

Inspired by
Game of Thrones
By George R. R. Martin
Created by
Clara Timpe
“Fall of the House
of Gushers”

Inspired by
“The Fall of the House of Ushers”
By E. A. Poe
Created by
Max H. Gurnard
“The Girl with the Dragon Tofu”

Inspired by
The Girl with the Dragon Tatto
Created by
Dylan Goldade & Brittany Chin

Viewing and Judging the Exhibits

 


Kama Ginkas and Contemporary Russian Theater

Please join us for a Faculty Colloquium with Sarah Bishop (Russian) who will present her talk titled: “Kama Ginkas and Contemporary Russian Theater”

My talk will introduce the work of Kama Ginkas, one of the most celebrated theater directors currently working in Russia, as well as provide a general sense of the vibrant and diverse theatrical scene in Moscow today. Born in 1941, Ginkas survived his early childhood in a Jewish ghetto in Lithuania and moved to Leningrad to study directing in 1962. His independent, innovative style made finding work difficult, and he nearly gave up on the theater in the 1970s. With a move to Moscow and the new openness of perestroika in the 1980s, however, Ginkas found his place in the Moscow Theater of the Young Spectator (MTiuZ).

Since the mid-1980s Ginkas has rarely staged traditional plays. Instead he has created his own shows based on literary texts, primarily prose. Rather than simply portraying the action of the text on the stage, however, Ginkas plays with the language itself. I will discuss Ginkas’s innovative use of language, and I will place him in the broader context of contemporary Russian theater, particularly the “new drama” movement of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Video clips from a variety of productions will be shown.

The talk will take place on Friday February 22at 3 p.m. in the Library Instruction Room. As usual, cookies and refreshments will be served.


Curricular Innovation: Wendy Petersen Boring and Marshall Curry

Title: “Curricular Innovation: Sustainability as a Catalyst for Pedagogical Creativity and Institutional Change”

Presenters: Wendy Petersen Boring, Associate Professor of History and Marshall Curry, Senior, Sociology Major

Abstract:

What does it mean to teach with a focus that is simultaneously bio-regional and global? What might a place-based curriculum look like? What good ideas are out there for courses that cross multiple disciplines to address divergent problems, or engage significantly with community partners, or develop student’s ethical, civic preparation, personal growth and self direction? How can universities function as centers for public political discourse and catalysts for political action and social change?

This presentation, which grows out of research for our LARC project (2012), “Ritual, Sustainability and Community” and (Wendy’s) forthcoming book, Teaching Sustainability: Perspectives from the Humanities and Social Sciences, aims to address these questions by surveying a range of pedagogical innovations across the country that fall under the rubric of “sustainability curriculum” Nationally, sustainability has begun functioning as a key innovator and instigator of systemic change across the university, causing a re-orientation of curriculum, research, pedagogy, university-community relationships, organizational change, policy, and institutional ethos. Sustainability curricular projects are on the cutting edge of pedagogical innovation, including project-based learning, place-based pedagogy, transformational learning, and partnerships with community, business, and non-profit partners. Integrating sustainability into the liberal arts provides a particularly compelling opportunity to integrate theory and practice into the liberal arts in a way that addresses increasing need for curriculum relevance, salience, and practicability.

Date/Time: Friday March 1, 2013, 3:00 PM
Location: Hatfield Room, Hatfield Library


Faculty Colloquium: Altman on Myosins

Title: “Regulation of the Motor Protein Myosin in the Cell”

Presenter: David Altman, Assistant Professor of Physics

Abstract:

Generation of force is critical for many processes in the cell. Central to these processes are molecular motors, biomolecules capable of creating directed motion. My lab studies myosins, a molecular motor family with members implicated in processes including muscle contraction, trafficking of cargo in the cell, and cell motility. Specifically, we seek to understand how the complex cellular environment regulates these motors. To this end, we study both purified myosins outside the cell as well as myosin motors within their cellular niche. This approach requires us to probe myosin activity at a variety of sizes and in systems of varying complexity. For example, we study both the small-scale motions (one-billionth of a meter) of individual motors, as well as the relatively large motions (one-thousandth of a meter) of ensembles of myosins in muscle fibers. In this talk, I will describe some of these studies and discuss how our results are beginning to reveal important factors in the regulation of myosins in the cell.

Date/Time: Friday March 8, 2013, 3:00 PM
Location: Hatfield Room, Hatfield Library


Sacred Scraps Exhibition

Five NW artists have come together and created an exhibit showcasing their use of found, recycled, and discarded treasures. Raw materials, found objects, the tools they use, and unique finished pieces of art will be incorporated into the display. The Sacred Scraps Exhibition will run February 1st to the 28th on the second floor in front of the Archives & Special Collections. An Opening Reception is planned for Friday, February 1 at 6:30 p.m. For directions and more information please visit: http://sacred-scraps.com/

Artists: Dayna Collins, Shelly Caldwell, Tory Brokenshire, Jennifer Campbell, Stephanie Brockway

With permission from the artists, below are some photos from the exhibit and reception.


Everyday Reading: Mike Chasar

Please join the English Department in celebrating the publication of Mike Chasar’s monograph Everyday Reading: Poetry and Popular Culture in Modern America (Columbia University Press, 2012).

Everyday Reading is the first full-length critical study of the culture surrounding American popular and commercial poetry in the twentieth century. Exploring poetry scrapbooks, old-time radio show recordings, advertising verse, corporate archives, and Hallmark greeting cards, among other unconventional sources, Mike Chasar casts American poetry as an everyday phenomenon consumed and created by a vast range of readers in different and complex ways. Capturing American poetry’s truly diverse forms and appeal, Chasar shows how the genre helped set the stage—before television, rock music, video games, and the Internet—for the dynamics of popular culture and mass media today.

Chasar investigates twentieth-century American poetry’s audience of millions and maps its range of aesthetics, cultural uses, relationship to canonical verse, and unexpected presence in many parts of modern life. Far from being a marginal art form read by a select group of educated individuals, poetry was part and parcel of American popular culture, spreading rapidly as the consumer economy expanded and companies such as Burma-Shave exploited the form’s profit-making potential. Poetry also offered ordinary Americans a wealth of opportunities for creative, emotional, political, and intellectual expression, whether through scrapbooking, participation in radio programs, or poetry contests. By reenvisioning the uses of twentieth-century poetry, Chasar enables a richer understanding of the innovations of modernist and avant-garde poets and the American reading public’s sophisticated powers of feeling and perception.

The book has been widely praised and nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Wednesday afternoon, December 5th, Professor Chasar will introduce and describe the book, answer questions, and perhaps be persuaded to autograph your copy.

We will gather at 4:15 in the Hatfield Room of the Hatfield Library. All are welcome.


The Art of Collaboration

Please join us on Thursday, November 29, for The Art of Collaboration, a special event of the Fall 2012 Hallie Ford Literary Series. The event will take place at 5 p.m. in the Hatfield Room and is free and open to the public.

The event will feature a reading by Minnesota poet Katharine Rauk, followed by a moderated discussion between Katharine and James Miley, jazz composer in Willamette’s Department of Music, about collaborating across media. Katharine and James have collaborated on an original composition, part of which will premiere later that evening in a performance by the Willamette Jazz Collective.

Katharine Rauk is the author of Basil, a chapbook published by Black Lawrence Press in 2011. She has poems published in Harvard Review, Georgetown Review, Cream City Review, and elsewhere, and she is an assistant editor of Rowboat: Poetry in Translation. She lives in Minneapolis and teaches at North Hennepin Community College and The Loft Literary Center.

Composer and Jazz Pianist James Miley joined the faculty of Willamette in the fall of 2009 as Assistant Professor of Music and Director of Jazz Studies. Recent recordings include Dan Cavanagh’s Jazz Emporium Big Band ‘s Pulse (OA2 Records, 2008) and Altered’s Angular (House of Drumming, 2008), along with releases by the jazz collective BUG (with saxophonist Peter Epstein) and classical trumpet virtuoso John Adler, both available on Seattle’s highly acclaimed Origin Records. He is also a founding member of the composer collective ECHO, which premiered his composition “Necessary Angels” for piano trio, electric guitar and human beatboxer in April, 2009.

Read one of Katharine’s poems here: http://www.versedaily.org/2012/january.shtml

Listen to a couple of James’ recordings here: http://originarts.com/recordings/recording.php?TitleID=82543


Faculty Colloquium: Meredyth Edelson

Please join us on Friday, November 30th at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium being presented by Meredyth Goldberg Edelson, Professor of Psychology.

TITLE:
Why have all the boys gone? Gender differences in prosecution acceptance of child sexual abuse cases.

ABSTRACT:
Cases of child sexual abuse (CSA) referred to the District Attorney (DA) are not necessarily accepted for prosecution. Two pilot studies sought to investigate whether there were gender differences in whether cases of CSA referred to the DA’s office were accepted by the DA and, if they existed, what might account for gender differences in decisions to accept cases and file charges. The results of the first study indicated that cases involving male victims were significantly less likely to be accepted for prosecution than cases involving female victims. Comparisons of acceptance rates were based on expected frequencies given CSA prevalence rates by gender in the literature and on the proportion of males and females seen at a Child Abuse Assessment Center (CAAC) from where the DA referrals were obtained. The second study assessed both disclosure-related variables (assessed by content analyses of disclosures made at a CAAC) and abuse-related variables (that occurred at or near the time of the abuse) that might explain these differences. Few variables were found to significantly differentiate males’ and females’ cases; these were the relationship of the child to the perpetrator, whether the child was offended by a juvenile, whether the child told someone of the abuse, pornography exposure, whether the child displayed concerning behaviors, and whether the child was questioned about possible abuse. Implications of these results are discussed.