Library News

Banned Book Week 2013

banned-bksBanned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

2012

Out of 464 challenges as reported by the Office for Intellectual Freedom, these were the top 10 books challenged from 2013.
  1. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey.
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group
  2. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie.
    Reasons: Offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group
  3. Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher.
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, suicide, unsuited for age group
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E. L. James.
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit
  5. And Tango Makes Three, by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson.
    Reasons: Homosexuality, unsuited for age group
  6. The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini.
    Reasons: Homosexuality, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  7. Looking for Alaska, by John Green.
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group
  8. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
    Reasons: Unsuited for age group, violence
  9. The Glass Castle, by Jeanette Walls
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit
  10. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Sexually explicit, religious viewpoint, violence

 

For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week visit the ALA Banned Books web site:

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek

Source: ALA Banned Books web site

An Evening with Poet Arisa White

Please join us as we open the Fall 2013 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University, with author Arisa White on Wednesday, September 25 at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room.
White-Arisa149
White is the author of two collections of poetry, A Penny Saved and Hurrah’s Nest, a finalist for the California Book Award and the Wheatley Poetry Prize. Her play Frigidare was staged for the 15th Annual Best of PlayGround Festival, and she was selected by the San Francisco Bay Guardian for the 2010 Hot Pink List.

World Book Night 2013 Photo

Here are some photos from this year’s World Book Night.  We hope those who received a copy of the book Glaciers enjoy reading it, and will pass it along to someone else after they’re finished reading it.  Let us know what you thought of this book, and what you thought of World Book Night by commenting on this blog post or Facebook!

Two prospective students receive copies of Glaciers while touring Willamette.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fun in the sun and World Book Night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By the Mill Stream on World Book Night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We posted a code word on Facebook to receive the book Glaciers, and within minutes someone someone came up to claim their “prize.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These two friends agreed to take turns and share the book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Really excited to get a copy of Glaciers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just coming from class and I got a book!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students receive copies of Glaciers from librarian John Repplinger on World Book Night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the right place and time by Goudy to get a copy of the book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Couldn’t wait to get a copy of this book!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students by the Mill Stream listen to Glaciers being read to them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A student in the Quad receives his copy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cat Cavern was one place we stopped to drop of a book. Most people were outside by the Mill Stream!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The last copy of Glaciers finds its way home.

 

 

 

 

Ancestral Voices: From Slaves to Matriarchs

Please join us for a presentation by Andries Fourie (Dept. of Arts) this Friday, April 12th at 3:00 pm in the Library Hatfield Room. The title of his talk is: “Ancestral Voices: From Slaves to Matriarchs”

In 1652 the Dutch East India Company (VOC) established a colony at the Cape of Good Hope. The VOC almost immediately began importing slaves, about half of which came from South and South East Asia (primarily Sri-Lanka, Indonesia, Malaysia, Bengal, the Coromandel Coast and Malabar Coast of India). Male colonists vastly outnumbered women in the early part of the colony’s history. Consequently male, white colonists frequently purchased, manumitted and married Asian slave women (the average Afrikaner today has about 8% Asian ancestry). In this way several slave women became the matriarchs of today’s Afrikaner families, and played an important role in shaping Afrikaner culture.

In this talk Andries Fourie will discuss his research on this subject and his recent installation and performance that explore the role of South and Southeast Asian slave women in shaping Afrikaans language, culture and foodways.

Coming Soon… World Book Night 2013

World Book Night, April 23, 2013

The second annual World Book Night (WBN) will be April 23rd, 2013.  On this night, tens of thousands of people go out into their communities to spread the joy and love of reading by giving out free WBN paperbacks courtesy of the World Book Night organization.

This is our second year to participate in this event, and we have selected “Glaciers” by Portland author Alexis M. Smith to distribute to 20 students, faculty and staff somewhere on campus.  Last year we handed out ten books at noon by the Mill Stream because it was such a nice day and everyone was outside.  We handed out ten more books in the evening in the Cat Cavern.  If you’re curious where we’ll hand out the books this year, check our Facebook page on April 22 & 23rd for hints of times and places.

Glaciers is in the Hatfield Library’s General Book Collection, and it can also be borrowed from other regional libraries.  If you don’t receive a free copy of Glaciers, we still encourage you to join in the celebration by reading a book of your choice.  The library has lots to choose from if you need inspiration.

Visit the World Book Night organization web site for more details: http://www.us.worldbooknight.org

Topology, Homology, and Applications to Data

Please join us for a presentation by Inga Johnson (Dept. of Mathematics) this Friday, April 5th at 3:00 pm in the Library Hatfield Room. The title of her talk is: Topology, Homology, and Applications to Data

Abstract: Topology is the subfield of mathematics that is concerned with the study of shape. Mathematicians have studied topological questions for the past 250 years. However, in just the past 15 years topology has been found to have many different applications to real world problems. One of these is to use a topological tool called persistence homology to understand and analyze high dimensional and complex data sets.

This talk will be an introduction to topology and the concept of homology. We will then use homology to a look at examples of how topological ideas can be used to give new and surprising insight towards understanding data. This talk will emphasize examples and concepts. Prerequisites will be minimal.

As always, light refreshments will be provided.

National Poetry Month 2013

If you didn’t know, April is National Poetry Month.  Created by the Academy of American Poets in 1996, National Poetry Month is held every April throughout the United States to celebrate poetry and its vital place in American culture. Thousands of organizations participate through readings, festivals, book displays, workshops, and other events.

For fun and inspirational ways to get involved, here’s a link to 30 ways of celebrating poetry.  For more information about National Poetry Month check out Poets.org.

Below is a sampling of recent poetry books that can be found in the Hatfield Library (posted during April on the WU Reads web page):

Cover Art

The auroras : new poems – St. John, David

Call Number: PS3569.A4536 A95 2012

 

Cover Art

By herself – Greger, Debora

Call Number: PS3557.R42 B9 2012

 

 

 

Cover Art

The football corporations: poems – Heyen, William

Call Number: PS3558.E85 F66 2012

 

 

Results from the Edible Book Festival, 2013

Second Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our second annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 15th, 2013, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. There were nearly twice as many entries this year, so a big thank you goes to all of our participants.  The Statesman Journal also provided wonderful photos of the exhibits and even a video interview of how Kimberly Miller and her collaborators created “The Monster Book of Monsters”  in the March 15th edition of the newspaper. Below are photos of the entries, the winners, and photos during the judging and awards ceremony.

 

Prizes awarded:

  • People’s Choice – “The Monster Book of Monsters” by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman.
  • Best Student Entry – “One Cake to Rule Them All” by Kelsey Kinavey.
  • Most Creative – “Lord of Pies” by Kelly Slaughter.
  • Most Literary – (Tie) “The Picture of Dorian Souffle” by Maureen Ricks; “Lay’s Miserables” by Katie Mariman.
  • Punniest – (Three-way tie) “Their Fries Were Watching Cod” by Sophie Hearn; “Their Eyes Were Watching Cod” by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar; “Pride and Prego Dish” by Liz Butterfield. 
  • Honorable Mention – “Hop on Pop” by Sara Amato.

 

“The Monster Book of Monsters”

Inspired by Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
By J.K. Rowling
Created by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman

People’s Choice

“One Cake to Rule Them All”

Inspired by The Lord of the Rings By JRR Tolkein
Created by Kelsey Kinavey

Best Student Entry

  “Lord of the Pies”

Inspired by Lord of the Flies
By William Golding
Created by Kelly Slaughter

Most Creative

  The Picture of Dorian Souffle

Inspired by The Picture of Dorian Gray
By Oscar Wilde
Created by Maureen Ricks

(Tie) Most Literary

 

  Lay’s Miserables

Inspired by Les Miserables
By Victor Hugo
Created by Katie Mariman

(Tie) Most Literary

 

Their Fries Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Sophie Hearn

(Tie) Punniest

 

  Their Eyes Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar

(Tie) Punniest

Pride and Prego Dish

Inspired by Pride and Prejudice
By Jane Austen
Created by Liz Butterfield

(Tie) Punniest

 

  Hop on Pop

Inspired by Hop on Pop
By Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel)
Created by Sara Amato

Honorable Mention

  “Hairy Potato”

Inspired by Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
By J.K. Rowling
Created by Amy Amato
  “The Marshmallowship of the Ring”

Inspired by The Fellowship of the Ring
By JRR Tolkein
Created by Victoria Binning
“Sylvia”

Inspired by Birthday Letters
By Ted Hughes
Created by Carol Drost
  “Clementine’s Letter”

Inspired by Clementine’s Letter
By Sara Pennypacker
Created by Mary, Ruby, & Hoy McRobinson
  “The Big Two-Hearted River”

Inspired by The Big Two-Hearted River
By Ernest Hemingway
Created by Sage Townsend
  “The Cats’ Table”

Inspired by The Cat’s Table
By Michael Ondaatje
Created by Joni Roberts
  “The Count of Monte Crisco”

Inspired by The Count of Monte Cristo
By  Alexandre Dumas
Created by John Repplinger
  “Oscar Meyer’s Salami”

Inspired by Salome
By Oscar Wilde
Created by Saran Walker
  “To Grill a Mockingbird”

Inspired by To Kill a Mocking Bird
By Harper Lee
Created by Emma Jonas
  “Pages Coming to Life – Jungle Book”

Inspired by Jungle Book
By Rudyard Kipling
Created by Leslie Whitaker
“Olive R Twist”

Inspired by Oliver Twist
By Charles Dickens
Created by Leslie Whitaker
  “Holes”

Inspired by Holes
By Louis Sachar
Created by Allison Boltwood

Viewing and Judging the Exhibits

 
 
 
 
 
 

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

 

Faculty Colloquium: From Clay to Music

Title: “From Clay to Music: Making and Playing a 7000-Year-Old Xun Musical Instrument”

Presenters: Juwen Zhang, Dept. of Japanese & Chinese / Heidi Preuss Grew, Art Department

Date/Time: Friday March 15, 2013, 3:00 PM

Location: Room 212, Art Building

Abstract:

The xun (塤; xūn) is a Chinese globular flute made of fired clay. It is one of the oldest Chinese instruments with a history of over 7,000 years. This presentation will discuss why the xun was essential to Chinese cosmology and cultural values, how it has become a core marker in the construction of Chinese national identity, and why the instrument has recently been revived in China and in the United States in Salem, Oregon. Guests to the lecture will see and hear the pieces Prof. Grew and Prof. Zhang made together that push the traditional xun form into artistic representations of the earth, the heavens, and animals. Willamette students will also participate in the musical presentation from these creations. “The xun replica Juwen Zhang first brought to the ceramics studio was a modest, egg shaped form,” Professor of Art Heidi Grew recalls, “but the audible projection from that humble object was simply remarkable. The entire atmosphere of the studio dramatically changed with its penetrating sound. Those gathered were silenced, transfixed, and transported to another place. We were in China.” Thus began the ongoing collaboration between two faculty members from the Art Department and Department of Japanese and Chinese. We look forward to sharing this work with the Willamette community.

As always, light refreshments will be provided. See you on Friday.

Bill Kelm and Stasinos Stavrianeas
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Edible Book Festival, March 15, 2013

YOU ARE INVITED TO PARTICIPATE IN THE
SECOND ANNUAL EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!!!!

Friday, March 15, 2013

Hatfield Room
Mark O. Hatfield Library

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

 

Last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle, University of Puget Sound, and Duke University. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Drop off your entries in the Hatfield Room on March 15 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book– all entries will be on view until 4:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—Mike Chasar (English), Hannah Elder (CLA ’13), Honey Wilson (President’s Office)—will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Student Entry
  • Most Literary
  • Most Creative
  • Punniest
  • People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners.

For questions, contact Carol Drost, 370-6715
cdrost@willamette.edu

 

The Exhibits

“Tortilla Flat”

Inspired by
Tortilla Flat
By John Steinbeck
Created by
Leslie Whitaker

“Heart of Darkness”

Inspired by
Heart of Darkness
By Joseph Conrad
Created by
Joni Roberts

“Swiss Family Rubinson”

Inspired by
Swiss Family Robinson
Created by
Carol Drost

“The Invisible Flan”

Inspired by
The Invisible Man
By H.G. Wells
Created by
Saran Walker

“The Invisible Jam”

Inspired by
The Invisible Man
By H.G. Wells
Created by
Robert Minato

“Spuds in Your Eye”

Inspired by
Suds in Your Eye
By Mary Lasswell
Created by
Alice French
“Jane Pear”

Inspired by
Jane Eyre
By Charlotte Bronte
Created by
Liz Butterfield
“Jack & the
Jelly Bean Stalk”

Inspired by
Jack & the
Bean Stalk
By Steven Kellogg
Created by
John Repplinger
“Game of Scones”

Inspired by
Game of Thrones
By George R. R. Martin
Created by
Clara Timpe
“Fall of the House
of Gushers”

Inspired by
“The Fall of the House of Ushers”
By E. A. Poe
Created by
Max H. Gurnard
“The Girl with the Dragon Tofu”

Inspired by
The Girl with the Dragon Tatto
Created by
Dylan Goldade & Brittany Chin

Viewing and Judging the Exhibits