Lecture: Electoral Politics in Southeast Asia

The Center for Asian Studies is pleased to invite you to a lecture and presentation by Prof. Meredith Weiss, University at Albany SUNY) on “Electoral Politics in Southeast Asia: Policy, Patronage, and Public Interest.”  The lecture will be on Monday, April 10 at 4:15 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of the Hatfield Library.  Refreshments will be served.

“Throughout Southeast Asia, in a range of phenomena sometimes collectively labeled “money politics,” candidates for elected office distribute patronage— benefits that might include cash, food and other goods, public-sector jobs, infrastructure projects, or other rewards—via clientelist networks. Sometimes illegal or illicit, other times above-ground and at least tacitly condoned, such practices span the electoral cycle and deeply inflect the quality and character of governance structures, democracy, and national integration. This seminar will offer an overview of a multi-year, cross-national, collaborative research project to track and compare these practices and their implications for candidates, political parties, citizens, and policies in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand.”

Read more about Professor Weiss at: http://www.albany.edu/rockefeller/faculty_pos_weiss.shtml


Roger Lowenstein Talk

The Economics Department, with support from the Gillis Fund, is excited to announce a talk by financial writer and bestselling author Roger Lowenstein on Monday, April 3rd at 4:15 p.m.  This event will be held in the Hatfield Room, and is free and open to the public.  There will be a book signing after the talk.

 


Results for the Edible Book Festival

Results for the 6th Annual Edible Book Festival!!!

Our sixth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 10th, 2017. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners who each won a $5 Bistro card:  Joni Roberts, Carol Drost, KayLyn Stirton and Yasmine Robles, Leslie Whitaker, and Dillon Peck.  The exhibits were all deliciously inspired!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event. Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 20152014, 2013, and 2012. For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
“Brownie Bear, Brownie Bear”

Created by
Mehayla Repplinger
Inspired by Eric Carle’s
“Brown Bear, Brown Bear”
People’s Choice
“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Created by
Liz Perkin & Gabrielle James
Inspired by
Mark Twain’s
“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”
Most Literary
“Midsummer Rice Dream”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
William Shakespeare’s
“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”
Punniest
“Caesar’s Garlic War”

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
Julius Caesar’s
“Caesar’s Gallic War”
Most Creative

 

 

Other Entries ……………………………..
“Peep Wars”

Created by
Selicity Icefire
Inspired by
George Lucas’
“Star Wars: A New Hope”
Peep Wars “Toot”

Created by
Paul Meuse
Inspired by
Leslie Patricelli’s
“Toot”
Peeps Jackson and the Olive-ians “Peeps Jackson and the
Olive-ians”

Created by
Brianna & Eliane Goff
Inspired by
Rick Rioran’s
“Percy Jackson and the Olympians”
Wild Mountain Thyme “Wild Mountain Thyme”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Rosamunde Pilcher’s
“Wild Mountain Thyme”
The Rosemary Spell “The Rosemary Spell”

Created by
Shelby Radcliffe & Kendra Mingo
Inspired by
Virginia Zimmerman’s
“The Rosemary Spell”
Many Waters “Many Waters”

Created by
Caleb Repplinger
Inspired by
Madeleine L’Engle’s
“Many Waters”
Celery Stalks at Midnight “Celery Stalks at Midnight”

Created by
Timothy Repplinger
Inspired by
Will Bradley’s
“Celery Stalks at Midnight”

The Done Cow
“The Done Cow”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Walter Wangerin’s
“The Book of the Dun Cow”
The Bone People “The Bone People”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
Martin Handford’s
“The Bone People”
“One Flew Over the
Cuckoo’s Nest”

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Ken Kesey’s
“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”
“Double Fudge”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Judy Blume’s
“Double Fudge”
“Who Moved my Cheese?”

Created by
Robert Minato
Inspired by
Spencer Johnson’s
“Who Moved my Cheese”

 

 

Extra Photos ………………       ……………..
 

 

 

 

 

 


Steampunk Fiction Lecture

“The Rise and Roots of Steampunk Fiction”
Lecture by Professor Rachel Bowser
Thursday, April 6th4:15 p.m.
Hatfield Room, Hatfield Library

 

Event Description: Once a small subculture, the steampunk phenomenon exploded during the first years of the twenty-first century, its prominence increasing ever since. From its Victorian and literary roots to film and television, video games, music, and even fashion, this subgenre of science fiction reaches far and wide in current culture. Steampunk matters in many ways–from disability and queerness to ethos and digital humanities. This lecture will discuss why we should be paying closer attention to this influential genre.

 

About the Speaker: Dr. Rachel A. Bowser is Associate Professor of English at Georgia Gwinnett College, just north of metro Atlanta. She researches and writes about Victorian fiction and steampunk, and teaches and talks about all kinds of British fiction, science fiction, and composition. In the 2017-2018 academic year, she will serve as a fellow in the American Council on Education leadership program. She is co-author of Like Clockwork: Steampunk Pasts, Presents, & Futures (Minnesota UP, 2016).

 


Talk by Vershawn Ashanti Young

“Should Students Use They Own English?” by Vershawn Ashanti Young

Wednesday, March 15, 4:30 p.m.
Location: Hatfield Room

In this talk, Young explains and demonstrates why students must develop agency, authority, and authenticity in all of their writing, and why they must also bring style, substance, and individuality to their writing in school and professional contexts. Young is an Associate Professor in the Department of Drama and Speech Communication and the Department of English at the University of Waterloo, Canada, where he teaches African American rhetoric, performance studies, and public communication. He is author of Your Average Nigga: Performing Race, Literacy, and Masculinity and co-author of Other People’s English: Code Meshing, Code Switching, and African American Literacy.

(Source: Campus events. Image source: University of Iowa)

 


6th Annual Edible Book Festival

THE MARK O. HATFIELD LIBRARY PRESENTS THE SIXTH ANNUAL EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL 

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, the Hatfield Library is pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by your favorite book, poem, character, or author—the only limit is your imagination.  Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible! Here are links to previous years’ entries (201620152014, 20132012).

Drop off your entries in the Hatfield Room on March 10 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible “book” between 8:00 a.m.-noon and 1:00-4:00 p.m.

At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—Michael Chasar, Monique Bourke, and Karla Gutierrez— will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Individual Student Entry
  • Best Student Group Entry
  • Most Literary
  • Most Creative
  • Punniest
  • People’s Choice

Light refreshments will be provided!

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715
cdrost@willamette.edu

 


Faculty Colloquium: Radical or Conventional Relationships

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, March 3rd at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our fifth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Huike Wen, Associate Professor of Chinese and Women and Gender Studies

Title: Radical or Conventional–Portrayal in Chinese Media of the Relationship between an Older Woman and a Younger Man

Huike Wen

The opinion that a husband should be a few years older than his wife is commonly accepted, although it is not rigid in reality and there are stories that tell otherwise in different cultures. The belief is supported by biological, sociological, economics, and psychological studies and by individuals’ reflections on experiences.

Contrary to the belief, in China, recently the romantic relationship between an older woman and a younger man has been a popular topic in the Chinese media landscape. Despite the increase in the number of such marriages and media attention on the older woman–younger man relationship, very little serious and in-depth academic work has focused on this relationship. As a myth, this type of relationship is basically represented as something new, modern, and radical, engaged in by many celebrities as well as creating media celebrities out of some ordinary people. The media portrayals seem to add another alternative in the discourse of heterosexual relationships, especially conventional heterosexual marriage. Focusing on recent popular Chinese television dramas, I examine how the media portrayals signal and celebrate a new form of relationship and marriage, yet still strongly reinforce the male-dominant status in romantic relationships.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Fred Moten Reading

Please join us for the second event in the Spring 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University, a reading by Fred Moten, acclaimed poet and scholar of African American literature and culture. The reading will take place on Wednesday, March 8, at 4:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. The event is free and open to the public.

Fred Moten, Professor of English, U of California

is the author of eight volumes of poetry, including The Feel Trio, a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of a California Book Award. His most recent collections include, The Little Edges, published by Wesleyan University Press in 2015, and The Service Porch, published by Letter Machine Editions in 2016; his scholarly books include In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition, and The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study, coauthored with Stefano Harney. He teaches at the University of California, Riverside.

In 2009, Moten was recognized as one of ten “New American Poets” by the Poetry Society of America. Poet and nonfiction author Maggie Nelson writes of his work, “With insistence, music, and a measured softness, Fred Moten’s poems construct idiosyncratic, critical canons that invite our research and repay our close attention. … It is hard to make poetry that shimmers on such an edge. Moten does so, and then some.”

Read Moten’s poem “The Salve Trade” here: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/53480

And read a recent interview here: http://lithub.com/an-interview-with-fred-moten-pt-i/

(Image source: http://english.ucr.edu/people/faculty/fred-moten)
(Text source: Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing; Department Chair of English)


Faculty Colloquium: An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, February 24th at 3 pm. in the EATON 425 for our fourth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. (Please note the change in location) Treats will be provided.

Inga Johnson, Professor of Mathematics

Title: An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory

As part of my last sabbatical, my collaborator, Allison Henrich, and I completed our book An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory (published by Dover, January 2017). Our text is unique not because of the mathematics that it contains, but rather due to the pedagogy it employs. We have designed the book to be used in an inquiry-based setting where students independently figure out, derive, and create many of the major results of knot theory while using our book as a guide. The book contains definitions, exercises, and statements of theorems, but the proofs and arguments that underlie the theory are left for readers to develop as they progress through the text. This active-learning pedagogy places the students ideas and arguments as the centerpiece of the course. As a result, class meetings include little to no lecture but are instead filled with student presentations followed by a process of questions and vetting by their peers.

In my talk I will discuss the following questions: what is the difference between math research and writing a mathematical book? How does an inquiry-based course compare to a “traditional” mathematics course? What goes into planning and managing an inquiry-based course, and how does one create inquiry-based activities? What is knot theory, and why is it a good topic for inquiry-based pedagogy? I will also discuss current research on student outcomes when inquiry-based methods are used and how those outcomes compare to non-inquiry-based courses.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Prosody and Time in Musical Settings of Emily Dickinson

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, February 10th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Marva Duerksen, Associate Professor of Music, Women’s & Gender Studies

Title: Prosody and Time in Musical Settings of Emily Dickinson

Musical settings of Emily Dickinson’s poems—some 3,000 by one collector’s reckoning—comprise a core component of the American art-song repertory and a sustained and wide-ranging constituent of her reception. That said, a mutually insightful conversation between musical and literary scholarly communities lies largely untapped, most especially in that facet of Dickinson’s poems that she herself highlights conspicuously and that constitutes a shared concern in both poetry and music: prosody, and its companion, time.

Several questions arise: how can literary prosodic method inform analysis of musical settings of her works? And, what insights can composers offer the literary community as they interpret the poet’s rhythmic and metric designs? More specifically, how do composers execute in music signal elements of Dickinson’s prosody—the familiar “dash,” a startling approach to rhyme, disruptions of conventional grammar, and idiosyncratic lineation? Then, how do composers’ renderings of such features through specially tempered rhythmic pacing, multi-layered rhythmic designs, and heterogeneous musical vocabularies in turn impact our comprehension of the disruptions endemic to her work? Finally, how can these analyses inform the categories of time—diachronic and synchronic—vital to Dickinson’s poetic project? Exploring these questions through literary models and musical settings by composers Ernst Bacon, Vincent Persichetti, and Niccoló Castiglioni provides a starting point for the dialogue proposed here.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators