Library News

Annual Giving Tree 2013

giving-tree-2013-1Items are starting to come in for the Tree of Giving Book Drive!  We are supporting both Hallman and Richmond Elementary schools this year, so we are looking forward to an excellent turnout of books.  Some key things to remember as we approach the final Drive date on December 17th:

- 30% discount at the Willamette Store for Book Drive books

- K-5 Spanish and English language books

(No holiday themes please)

- Drop off locations are at the Circulation Desk in the Hatfield Library & the Willamette Store

- Gloves, hats, and cash for books are also desired

- Check out the LibGuide  for more information: http://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving

This is our seventh annual Tree of Giving Book Drive!  Please visit our Tree of Giving located near the entrance of the library, and see the beautiful ornaments adorning it.  For every book donated, we add one ornament to our Tree of giving.

So think of the Tree of Giving as you do your Black Friday shopping!  And thank you for your support from the Mark O. Hatfield Library, Willamette Store, and Student-Athlete Advisory Committee

 

 

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Brownbag Discussion with Former Staff to Senator Hatfield

BA feature-length documentary film highlighting the leadership and career of the late Senator Mark O. Hatfield will also premiere Tuesday, November 19 in Portland.

In conjunction with this event, the Mark O. Hatfield Library and University Archives are pleased to announce that several former Congressional staff members to Senator Hatfield, including a number of WU Alums, will be reuniting on campus and making themselves available for a conversation about Senator Hatfield.  This will take place on November 18th at 12-1pm in the Hatfield Room of the library. This gathering will provide an opportunity for an informal discussion of the Senator, his career, and most importantly, the staffers’ personal experiences working alongside the Senator through many incredible moments in Oregon and United States history.

Please bring your own lunch and lots of questions for this causal get-together. Light refreshments will be provided.  For additional information please contact Mary McRobinson, University Archivist, 503-370-6764; <mmcrobin@willamette.edu>

Information on The Hatfield Project and documentary film The Gentleman of the Senate: Oregon’s Mark Hatfield, including ticket information, can be found at: http://hatfieldfilm.com

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Hallie Ford Literary Series: New Voices Showcase

Please join us for the final event in the Fall 2013 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette. On Monday, November 18, at 5 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of the library, we will host a New Voices Showcase, featuring poet Emily Kendal Frey and memoirist/essayist Jay Ponteri. The two debut writers will read from and discuss their work and answer questions about the first book experience. The event is free and open to the public. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

Emily Kendal Frey’s first full length poetry collection, The Grief Performance, won the Poetry Society of America’s 2012 Norma Farber First Book Award. She teaches at Portland Community College and The Independent Publishing Resource Center.

Read Emily’s poems here: http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/22629 and here: http://bombsite.com/issues/1000/articles/6252.
Read an interview with her here: http://www.bookslut.com/features/2011_06_017747.php.

Jay Ponteri is the author of the memoir Wedlocked, released in the spring of 2013. He directs the creative writing program at Marylhurst University and is the founder of a summer creative writing camp for high school students. His essay, “Listen to This,” was cited as a Notable Essay of 2009 by the editors of Best American Essays.

Read some of Jay’s recently published work here: http://www.ghostproposal.com/issue3/jayponteri.php.
Read a review of Wedlocked here: http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2013/04/wedlocked-by-jay-ponteri.html.

Or listen to a podcast in which Emily and I discuss his book here: http://latenightlibrary.org/wedlocked/.

Colloqium: Gauging and Strengthening Quantitative Skills at Entry

Please join us this Friday, November 8th at 2:00 pm in the Library’s Hatfield Room for a special presentation by Margot Black, Director, Symbolic and Quantitative Resource Center, Lewis & Clark College. James Friedrich (Department of Psychology) is sponsoring Professor Black’s presentation.Margot_Black_sm

Title: Gauging and Strengthening Quantitative Skills at Entry: New Options for Improving Students’ Course Placement and Academic Success

Abstract: Mathematically underprepared students are a large and growing concern in higher education. This can pose special challenges for small, liberal arts colleges with limited course offerings. Identifying and addressing the needs of these students enhances their success across a wide range of courses in the sciences, humanities, and arts. Doing so also contributes to broader institutional success in terms of graduation rates and retention. If a college admits students with such varied quantitative preparation, I suggest that it bears the responsibility of providing certain resources necessary to help them be successful in their courses. In this talk I will discuss how Lewis & Clark College handles math proficiency and placement testing as well as options for remediation for those students who need it most. Such placement and support efforts ultimately contribute to the academic success of all students, including those initially seen as having strong quantitative preparation.

Bamboo Musical Instrument Exhibit: Sounds of Harmony Series

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Please visit our temporary exhibit Sounds of Harmony, which will be on display until November 3rd outside of the Archives & Special Collections entrance.  This display of traditional bamboo musical instruments complements the talks and music demonstrations related to the Music in the Reconstruction of Identity and Healing/Therapy of the Modern Mind-and-Heart series.

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Dynamics and Problems of Using Games to Teach

Please join us this Friday, November 1st at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for a presentation by Frederick J. Oerther, III, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics.

Title: Dynamics and Problems of Using Games to Teachoerthersmall

Brief Description: This presentation will argue for the usefulness of games as an educational device. We begin by discussing the nature of games and describing the student’s “game experience” in the classroom. Then we will make some assertions about how the game experience might be expected to contribute to the learning process – including the leveraging of scholastic motivations that games may offer on the basis of social and phenomenological factors. The features and properties of a specific form of game, which may be most useful in the classroom, called the “Fully Human Interactive Game,” are surveyed. We conclude with a discussion of some of the problems which may accompany using games to teach.

Senior Humanities Seminar Guest Scholar on Walt Whitman

All are invited to the following lecture being given by Ed Folsom, the world’s foremost expert on Walt Whitman. Folsom is visiting WU as this semester’s Senior Humanities Seminar guest scholar.

Thursday, October 24, 4:15-5:15pm
“‘That towering bulge of pure white’: Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, the Capitol Dome, and Black America”
Dr. Ed Folsom
Hatfield Room

This lecture examines how Walt Whitman and Herman Melville responded to the decision to expand the national Capitol building and to crown it with a massive white dome, and it explores how the dome was perceived in racial terms as it was being built and completed.

Folsom is the Carver Professor of American Literature at the University of Iowa. An award-winning teacher and scholar, he is the author, co-author, or editor of many books including Walt Whitman: The Measure of His Song (1981), Walt Whitman’s Native Representations (1994), Walt Whitman and the World (1995), Whitman East and West: New Contexts for Reading Walt Whitman (2002), Whitman Making Books/Books Making Whitman (2005), Re-Scripting Walt Whitman (2005), and Leaves of Grass: The Sesquicentennial Essays (2007). He edits the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review and co-directs the Walt Whitman Archive (http://www.whitmanarchive.org/).

More on Folsom:

http://www.uiowa.edu/be-remarkable/portfolio/people/folsom-e.html

Sounds of Harmony: Traditional Music in the Reconstruction of Identity and Healing

Sounds of Harmony: Traditional Music in the Reconstruction of Identity and Healing/Therapy of the Modern Mind-And-Heart

The Hatfield Library will have on display bamboo musical instruments from Yunnan, China, October 26-November 3rd. Also of note, there will be a public concert on traditional Chinese music and a seminar on traditional music and identity reconstruction (details below).

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Hallie Ford Literary Series: Lydia Davis

Please join us for the second event in the Fall 2013 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette. On Thursday, October 24, at 7:30 p.m. in Cone Chapel, internationally acclaimed fiction writer Lydia Davis will read from and discuss her work.
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Lydia Davis is one of the world’s most celebrated practitioners of the short story. The author of seven collections of short fiction and a novel, she was recently awarded the Man Booker International Prize, the most prestigious international award for lifetime achievement in literature after the Nobel Prize. Her work has appeared in both the Best American Short Stories and Best American Poetry anthologies, and her collection Varieties of Disturbance was a finalist for the National Book Award. Also an accomplished translator of French literature, Davis recently published a new translation of Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary.

About The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis, a New York Times Editor’s Choice, critic James Wood, wrote in The New Yorker, “[Hers is] a body of work probably unique in American writing, in its combination of lucidity, aphoristic brevity, formal originality, sly comedy, metaphysical bleakness, philosophical pressure, and human wisdom. I suspect that ‘The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis’ will in time be seen as one of the great, strange American literary contributions.”

Read five of Davis’s very short stories here: http://www.conjunctions.com/archives/c24-ld.htm

Or, listen to a podcast of novelist James Salter reading Davis’s classic story, “Break It Down,” here: http://www.theguardian.com/books/audio/2013/may/23/james-salter-lydia-davis-break-it-down

Banned Book Week 2013

banned-bksBanned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

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Out of 464 challenges as reported by the Office for Intellectual Freedom, these were the top 10 books challenged from 2013.
  1. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey.
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group
  2. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie.
    Reasons: Offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group
  3. Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher.
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, suicide, unsuited for age group
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E. L. James.
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit
  5. And Tango Makes Three, by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson.
    Reasons: Homosexuality, unsuited for age group
  6. The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini.
    Reasons: Homosexuality, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  7. Looking for Alaska, by John Green.
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group
  8. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
    Reasons: Unsuited for age group, violence
  9. The Glass Castle, by Jeanette Walls
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit
  10. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Sexually explicit, religious viewpoint, violence

 

For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week visit the ALA Banned Books web site:

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek

Source: ALA Banned Books web site