WU Author: Allison Hobgood

The English Department is delighted to invite you to celebrate the launch of Professor Hobgood’s new books, Passionate Playgoing in Early Modern England (Cambridge University Press) and Recovering Disability in Early Modern England (Ohio State University Press). hobgood Professor Hobgood will discuss the process of writing and publishing both a monograph and co-edited collection of scholarly essays. Light refreshments will be served.

Date: April 2nd
Time: 4:30-5:30pm
Hatfield Room, Hatfield Library

Sponsored by the English Department

Passionate Playgoing in Early Modern England

Allison P. Hobgood tells a new story about the emotional experiences of theatregoers in Renaissance England. Through detailed case studies of canonical plays by Shakespeare, Jonson, Kyd and Heywood, the reader will discover what it felt like to be part of performances in English theatre and appreciate the key role theatregoers played in the life of early modern drama. How were spectators moved – by delight, fear or shame, for example – and how did their own reactions in turn make an impact on stage performances? Addressing these questions and many more, this book discerns not just how theatregoers were altered by drama’s affective encounters, but how they were undeniable influences upon those encounters. Overall, Hobgood reveals a unique collaboration between the English world and stage, one that significantly reshapes the ways we watch, read and understand early modern drama.

“Allison Hobgood’s persuasive addition to the burgeoning study of affect and emotion in Renaissance culture offers a provocative new reading of some familiar plays. Her argument that early modern spectators and plays are involved in a reciprocal emotional contagion makes a powerful contribution to our changing conception of theater audiences in the period.”
-Emma Smith, University of Oxford

Recovering Disability in Early Modern England

While early modern selfhood has been explored during the last two decades via a series of historical identity studies involving class, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality, until very recently there has been little engagement with disability and disabled selves in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. This omission is especially problematic insofar as representations of disabled bodies and minds serve as some of the signature features in English Renaissance texts. Recovering Disability in Early Modern England explores how recent conversations about difference in the period have either overlooked or misidentified disability representations. It also presents early modern disability studies as a new theoretical lens that can reanimate scholarly dialogue about human variation and early modern subjectivities even as it motivates more politically invested classroom pedagogies. The ten essays in this collection range across genre, scope, and time, including examinations of real-life court dwarfs and dwarf narrators in Edmund Spenser’s poetry; disability in Aphra Behn’s assessment of gender and femininity; disability humor, Renaissance jest books, and cultural ideas about difference; madness in revenge tragedies; Spenserian allegory and impairment; the materiality of literary blindness; feigned disability in Jonsonian drama; political appropriation of Richard III in the postcommunist Czech Republic; the Book of Common Prayeras textual accommodation for cognitive disability; and Thomas Hobbes’s and John Locke’s inherently ableist conceptions of freedom and political citizenship.


Edible Book Festival Results, 2014

Third Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our third annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 14th, 2014, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Below are photos of the entries and the winners.

 

Award Winners
war-and-peas2 “War and Peas”

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
People’s Choice
pitcher-dory-gray “Pitcher of Dory in Gray

Created by Emily Wetherford
Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s
Portrait of Dorian Gray”
Best Student Entry
 dune He Who Controls the
Spice Controls the Universe

Created by Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by Frank Herbert’s
“Dune”
Most Creative
war-and-peas War and Peas

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Most Literary
 wholey-bible2 The Hole-y Bible

Created by Anna Corner
Inspired by “The Holy Bible”
Punniest
Other Entries
 snow “Roe Falling on Pitas”

Created by Joni Roberts
Inspired by David Guterson’s
“Snow Falling on Cedars”
clockwork-orange “A Clockwork Orange”

Created by Elaine Goff
Inspired by Anthony Burgess’
“A Clockwork Orange”
 three-pigs “Three Little Pigs”

Created by Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
“Three Little Pigs”
 butter-battle “The Butter Battle Book”

Created by Amy Amato
Inspired by Dr. Seuss’
“The Butter Battle Book”
 hotel “Hotel at the Corner of
Bitter and Sweet”

Created by Sara Amato
Inspired by Jamie Ford’s “Hotel at
the Corner of Bitter and Sweet”
 wind “Gone with the Wind”

Created by Liz Butterfield
Inspired by Margaret Mitchell’s
“Gone with the Wind”
dirty-dozen “The Dirty Dozen”

Created by Kelly Slaughter
Inspired by E. M. Nathanson’s
“The Dirty Dozen”
 pizza “The Lite in the Pizza”

Created by Carol Drost
Inspired by Elizabeth Spencer’s
“The Light in the Piazza”
mentos “All Spice and Mentos”

Created by Joni Roberts
Inspired by John Steinbeck’s
“Of Mice and Men”
 greenbean “The Loneliness of the Long
Distant Runner Bean”

Created by Peter Harmer
Inspired by Alan Sillitoe’s
“The Loneliness of the Long
Distant Runner”
Additional Photos
coddled-connie judging
fresh-frank exhibits
smelly-shelly roe
rotten-roy war-peas
raw-ramona war-peas2
pickled-paul holey-bible-cake
judging1 judging2
judging3 judging4
judging5 judging6
judging7 judging8

For  questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

 


Novelist: Adrianne Harun

Please join us for the final event in the Spring 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a reading and talk by acclaimed novelist Adrianne Harun on Thursday, April 3. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.

Adrianne is the author of A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain, released this month by Penguin Books. Inspired by the disappearance of Native girls from a stretch of highway in British Columbia, the novel weaves together folklore, mythology, and elements of magical realism to create a compelling and unsettling portrait of life in a dead-end town.Harun

The Vancouver Sun calls the book “remarkable. It reads with the level care of a finely crafted story, the sort you might find in a literary magazine, but also with the fresh familiarity of a folksong.”

A long-time resident of Port Townsend, Washington, Adrianne teaches in the Rainier Writing Workshop MFA Program at Pacific Lutheran University and the Sewanee School of Letters at the University of the South. Her first story collection, The King of Limbo, was a Sewanee Writing Series selection and a finalist for the Washington Book Award.

Listen to an interview with Adrianne here: http://otherpeoplepod.com/archives/2709

Scott Nadelson
Hallie Ford Chair in Writing


National Nutrition Month

Image source: nih.gov Nutrition Month
Image source: NIH.gov Nutrition Month

March is National Nutrition Month! After the past few months of holiday meals, you may be motivated to start eating more nutritiously and exercise regularly.  A big emphasis during this month is simply to make INFORMED CHOICES about the food you eat and to develop sound eating and physical activity habits. Remember to not give up on changing your goal of living healthier.  Good habits take a long time to establish (66 days or more).

Here are a few tips taken from EATRIGHT.ORG:

  1. Explore New Foods, Flavors and ‘Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.’ If your food begins to loose its luster, adding more nutrition and pleasure to each meal is as easy as expanding the range of foods you choose. Try one new fruit, vegetable or whole grain every week. Start small by picking a different type of apple, a different color potato or a new flavor of whole-grain rice until you are comfortable picking entirely new things that you’ve never tried or heard of before.
  2. The next time you eat out, choose a restaurant that features ethnic foods from Asia, Europe or Africa. These restaurants often feature menus filled with healthy options that will be new to you.
  3. If you prepare your own meals, add a pinch of this or that to give your regular dishes some additional zing.  Remember, you have about 10,000 taste buds, so don’t be afraid to try something new.

The National Library of Medicine has some great suggestions for eating habits and behaviors:

  1. A food journal is a good tool to help you learn about your eating habits. Keep a food journal for 1 week.
    • Write down what you eat, how much, and what times of day you are eating.
    • Include notes about what else you were doing and how you were feeling, such as being hungry, stressed, tired, or bored. For example, maybe you were at work and were bored. So you got a snack from a vending machine down the hall from your desk.
    • At the end of the week, review your journal and look at your eating patterns. Decide which habits you want to change.
  2. Reflect on your food journal.  Look at your journal and circle any regular or repetitive triggers. Some of these might be:
    • You see your favorite snack in the pantry or vending machine
    • When you watch television
    • You feel stressed by something at work or in another area of your life
    • You have no plan for dinner after a long day
    • You go to work events where food is served
    • You stop at fast-food restaurants for breakfast and choose high fat, high calorie foods
    • You need a pick-me-up toward the end of your workday
  3. Replace your old habits with new ones.
    1. Find health choices for snacks and plan ahead. Take only a small portion, put it in a dish and put the rest away. Eat fruit and yogurt in the mid-afternoon about 3 or 4 hours after lunch.
    2. Eat only when you are hungry. Eating when you are feel worried, tense, or bored also leads to overeating. Instead, call a friend or go for a walk to help you feel better.
    3. Eat Slowly. Eating too quickly leads to overeating when the food you have eaten has not yet reached your stomach and told your brain you are full. You will know you are eating too quickly if you feel stuffed about 20 minutes after you stop eating.
    4. Plan your meals. Know what you will eat ahead of time so you can avoid buying unhealthy foods (impulse buying) or eating at fast-food restaurants.
    5. Get rid of unhealthy foods. Put them out of sight or in hard to reach places.  Replace your candy dish with a bowl of fruit or nuts.
  4. An old saying goes: “Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.”
    1. Breakfast sets the tone for the day. A hearty, healthy breakfast will give your body the energy it needs to get you to lunch.
    2. Plan a good lunch that will satisfy you, and a healthy afternoon snack that will keep you from becoming to hungry before dinner time.
    3. Avoid skipping meals. Missing a regular meal or snack often leads to overeating or making unhealthy choices.

     

Don’t forget that we have a huge selection of books dealing with nutrition.  A few of them are highlighted this month on our WU Reads page.


Poet Wendy Willis

Please join us for the second event in the Spring 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University: an Alumni Showcase, featuring WU grad and poet Wendy Willis on Wednesday, March 12. Wendy will read from and discuss her recently published first collection of poems, Blood Sisters of the Republic, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of the library. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store. The event is free and open to the public.wendy_willis

Wendy splits her time between her roles as mother, poet, and advocate for democracy. She is the Executive Director of the Policy Consensus Initiative, a national non-profit organization devoted to improving democratic governance. In addition to publishing poetry and essays in a variety of national and regional journals and serving as an adjunct fellow in poetry at the Attic Institute, Willis has served as a federal public defender and as the law clerk to Chief Justice Wallace P. Carson, Jr. of the Oregon Supreme Court. She graduated magna cum laude from Georgetown Law Center and holds a B.A. from Willamette University. She lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband, his son and her two young daughters.

About Blood Sisters of the Republic, the poet Stanley Plumly says, “Wendy Willis is a poet of serious heart, a fact of enormous importance to the political and personal terms of her first book. While her politics lie in a generosity of spirit, her affections border on the extravagant. There is something wonderfully wild at the center of her poems, a freedom earned by craft. Blood Sisters of the Republic is as much about its local life as it is about national conscience. Plentitude and complexity are the hallmarks of its voice. And love is its signature.”

Sample one of Wendy’s poems here: http://therumpus.net/2013/04/national-poetry-month-day-6-swim-lesson-no-3-by-wendy-willis/.

Or read her essay “On Writing and Subversion” here: http://wendywillisdotme.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/a-poetry-pep-talk-on-writing-and-subversion/

Come celebrate this Willamette success story!

Scott Nadelson
Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Department of English
(503) 370-6290
snadelso@willamette.edu


Edible Book Festival, 2014 Announcement

edible-books-2014

The Mark O. Hatfield Library invites you to participate in the third annual
EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!

Friday, March 14, 2014.  Hatfield Room.

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year.  Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

Some of last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle Public Library, UCLA, and Duke University. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Free to enter– no registration required.  Drop off your entry in the Hatfield Room on March 14 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.  If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display.  Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book until 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

All entries will be on display from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.  Even if you don’t enter, you can cast a vote for your favorite edible book.  At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—David Craig (Biology), Ford Schmidt (Hatfield Library), and a CLA student (tbd) —will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Student Entry
  • Most Literary
  •  Most Creative
  • Punniest
  •  People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners.  For more information and to view all photos of the last two year’s entries, go to:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2013/03/19/edible-book-festival-2013-results/

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2012/04/06/firstedible-books-festival-2012/

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu

Prizes awarded:

  • People’s Choice – “The Monster Book of Monsters” by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman.
  • Best Student Entry – “One Cake to Rule Them All” by Kelsey Kinavey.
  • Most Creative – “Lord of Pies” by Kelly Slaughter.
  • Most Literary – (Tie) “The Picture of Dorian Souffle” by Maureen Ricks; “Lay’s Miserables” by Katie Mariman.
  • Punniest – (Three-way tie) “Their Fries Were Watching Cod” by Sophie Hearn; “Their Eyes Were Watching Cod” by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar; “Pride and Prego Dish” by Liz Butterfield. 
  • Honorable Mention – “Hop on Pop” by Sara Amato.

 

“The Monster Book of Monsters”

Inspired by Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
By J.K. Rowling
Created by Kimberly Miller, Audrey Kaltenbach and Matt Bateman

People’s Choice

 

 

“One Cake to Rule Them All”

Inspired by The Lord of the Rings By JRR Tolkein
Created by Kelsey Kinavey

Best Student Entry

 

 

  “Lord of the Pies”

Inspired by Lord of the Flies
By William Golding
Created by Kelly Slaughter

Most Creative

  The Picture of Dorian Souffle

Inspired by The Picture of Dorian Gray
By Oscar Wilde
Created by Maureen Ricks

(Tie) Most Literary

 

Lay’s Miserables

Inspired by Les Miserables
By Victor Hugo
Created by Katie Mariman

(Tie) Most Literary

 

Their Fries Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Sophie Hearn

(Tie) Punniest

 

Their Eyes Were Watching Cod

Inspired by Their Eyes Were Watching God
By Zora Neale Hurston
Created by Megan Newcomb and Grace Katzmar

(Tie) Punniest

Pride and Prego Dish

Inspired by Pride and Prejudice
By Jane Austen
Created by Liz Butterfield

(Tie) Punniest

 

Hop on Pop

Inspired by Hop on Pop
By Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel)
Created by Sara Amato

Honorable Mention

 

 

 


Fulbright Scholar Program Panel

Please join us Friday, February 14th at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium panel discussion.

Title: The Fulbright Scholar Program

Abstract: If you have ever thought about applying for a Fulbright–still one of the most highly regarded international exchange programs in the United States and abroad–and have questions, come and talk with our experienced Fulbrighters. What’s it like to take your children to a foreign country on a Fulbright grant? What teaching assignments could you expect? What will you bring to the country you’re living in, and what could you expect to take away from the experience? These questions and many more can all be discussed at this Faculty Colloquium focused on the Fulbright Scholar Program.

Our panelists will include:

Ron Loftus (Japan, twice, Core Scholar Grant)
David McCreery (Jordan, Core Scholar grant and Fulbright-Hays Group Project Abroad leader)
Joyce Millen (Senegal, dissertation award and current Fulbright panelist)
Pamela Moro (Thailand, as a graduate student and Core Scholar)
Scott Pike (Greece, dissertation award)
Todd Silverstein (Norway, Core Scholar grant)
Bill Smaldone (Germany, twice, Core Scholar grant)
Mike Strelow (Spain, Core Scholar grant)

We hope that you will be able to join us.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Playwright Ricardo Bracho, Feb. 19

Please join us for the first event in the Spring 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a reading and talk by acclaimed playwright Ricardo Bracho, on Wednesday, Feburary 19. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.
Born in Mexico City and raised in Los Angeles, Bracho has had a twenty-year career as a playwright, educator, essayist, producer, and dramaturg. His plays, including The Sweetest Hangover, Sissy, A to B, Mexican Psychotic, Puto and Ni Madre, have been produced in California and New York, and have been developed and read nationally.Bracho

“I feel strongly about theatre: that it is intrinsic to democratic dialogue, that it can transform lives and communities,” says Bracho.

Bracho has participated in the NEA/TCG Residency Program for Playwrights, Mabou Mines Resident Artists’ Suite, UCSB Summer Theater Lab, and was Visiting Artist/Scholar at UCSB’s Center for Chicano Studies. He has received grants, commissions, and awards from the Creative Work Fun, Brown University, Magic Theatre/Exploratorium Museum, UC Santa Barbara, and the Center Theater Group, among others. His poems, essays, and play excerpts have been published in IN YOUR FACE, Behind our Backs/Sumt’n to Say, Encylopedia, Cast Out, Corpus and Virgins, and in Guerrillas y Locas. He has also worked extensively in the fields of harm reduction, drug policy/research, HIV service and analysis, and Lati@, gay men of color, and lgbt youth of color organizing with Proyecto ContraSIDA Por Vida, LLEGO, the Harm Reduction Coaliton, the H.I.P.H.O.P. Project (Health in Prison, Health Outta Prison) and Fierce!, among others.

This event is sponsored by the Hallie Ford Chair in Writing and the Departments of English, Theatre, Politics, American Ethnic Studies, and Women and Gender Studies at Willamette University.

For more information, contact:
Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Willamette University
snadelso@willamette.edu
503-370-6290


Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

Beginning on Monday, Dec. 2, the Hatfield Library will be open extended hours for final exams.
These are the hours for the end of the term:

Monday, Dec. 2 – Thursday, Dec. 5 — 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 6 — 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 7 — 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 8 — 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 9 – Friday, Dec. 13 — 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 14 — 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 15 — CLOSED

Winter break begins on Monday, Dec. 16. During the break, the library will be open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on weekends. Also, the library (and the rest of campus) will be closed from Dec. 23 through Jan. 2. Regular hours resume on Jan. 13.


Annual Giving Tree 2013

giving-tree-2013-1Items are starting to come in for the Tree of Giving Book Drive!  We are supporting both Hallman and Richmond Elementary schools this year, so we are looking forward to an excellent turnout of books.  Some key things to remember as we approach the final Drive date on December 17th:

- 30% discount at the Willamette Store for Book Drive books

- K-5 Spanish and English language books

(No holiday themes please)

- Drop off locations are at the Circulation Desk in the Hatfield Library & the Willamette Store

- Gloves, hats, and cash for books are also desired

- Check out the LibGuide  for more information: http://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving

This is our seventh annual Tree of Giving Book Drive!  Please visit our Tree of Giving located near the entrance of the library, and see the beautiful ornaments adorning it.  For every book donated, we add one ornament to our Tree of giving.

So think of the Tree of Giving as you do your Black Friday shopping!  And thank you for your support from the Mark O. Hatfield Library, Willamette Store, and Student-Athlete Advisory Committee

 

 

giving-tree-2013-2