Alumni Weekend Events

We have a few events that will be held in the Hatfield Library during Alumni Weekend, Sept 22-25.  All are invited to attend and participate, and we hope to see you there! The link to the full schedule is:
http://willamette.edu/alumni/activities/alumni_weekend/schedule/index.html

FRIDAY, Sept 23rd

HATFIELD LIBRARY TOUR

9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
Join alumni for a tour of the Hatfield Library and a special presentation from University Archives. Stick around after the tour for the session, “Willamette’s Political Papers Collection.”
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Circulation Desk (1st Floor)

 

WILLAMETTE’S POLITICAL PAPERS COLLECTION
10:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Willamette University has a long tradition of educating politically and civically engaged leaders. But did you know WU’s Archives and Special Collections has a significant Political Archive documenting some of the most important regional and national legislation of the late 20th century? Join the Politics Department and Archives Department for a conversation centering on significant environmental legislation with former U.S. congressional leaders including Mike Kopetski and Bob Packwood ’54 (whose congressional papers are housed in WU’s archives) and learn why these collections are invaluable in helping us tell our collective story.
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

 

THE EVOLUTION OF WILLAMETTE’S ARCHITECTURAL AND NATURAL LANDSCAPE
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
Curious to know how Willamette’s campus evolved from a single building in a field to the beautiful setting we appreciate today? Come hear public historian Dr. William F. Willingham ’66 as he shares information that he has accumulated while researching Willamette’s architectural and natural landscape for his forthcoming book on the subject.
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

FRIDAY, Sept 23rd

THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF ELECTIONS AMERICAN STYLE
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Join Professor Melissa Michaux, Politics, for this discussion: Elections are supposed to be the vehicle to transcribe voter preferences into action, set an agenda for a governing majority and reassure Americans that we live in a democracy where the will of the people are expressed. Many features of modern American elections make these goals difficult. What should voters expect from American elections? What are they likely to get?
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

 


Fall Semester Hours

We will continue our shortened building hours throughout the week of August 22nd (8 am – 5 pm).  On Saturday we will be open 10-4pm, but closed all day Sunday.  Monday, August 29, the first day of class, our hours will extend to 8 am – Midnight.

Our full semester hours will begin Monday, August 5th (7:45 am – 2 am) weekdays, Saturdays (10 am – 9 pm), and Sundays (10 am – 2 am).

Details at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar/

 

the-eleventh-hour-1364077_960_720

(Image source: Pixabay.com)


Welcome (Back)

Welcome to the Mark O. Hatfield Library, for those who are new to our library.  And welcome back for those who are returning!  We are ready for your return, and hope you’re ready to come back.  As you probably already know, we have top notch librarians to help with your upcoming research, plus excellent tools and resources.

Here is a link to get to a page that will help orient you to our library, or refresh your knowledge.  (And for the record, several Pokemon have been found in and around the library!)


Faculty Colloquium: La Maldad de Martin Wong: Approximating Nuyorico

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 15th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.Roy Perez

Roy Perez, Assistant Professor of English and American Ethnic Studies

Title: La Maldad de Martin Wong: Approximating Nuyorico

Abstract: Nicknamed “Chino Malo,” gay Chinese-American painter and art collector Martin Wong lived in Manhattan’s Lower East Side in the 1980s, where he circulated among and collaborated with a number of Puerto Rican artists and writers. In this talk, I explore how Wong’s proximity to Nuyorican (Puerto Rican New York) culture appears in and shapes his paintings. I also examine Martin Wong’s presence as a queer Asian American painter in the popular history of Latina/o arts and culture. Often depicting men of color in erotic positions and encounters, Wong’s paintings lurk on the margin of accepted Latino art history, challenging typical representations of Latino masculinity. What happens when we move Wong to the center of Latino art and cultural history? What does Wong’s vision of Nuyorico reveal to us about its people, landscape, and culture? I contend that Wong’s visual poetics enact a series of queer advances that unsettle Nuyorico’s “good” center. Mal movement or comportment—to defer fear of committing maldades and willfully do things badly, wrongly, or approximately—loosens racial identity practices from their toil toward completion and full knowing.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Sister Outsider, April 19

Please join us for the final event in the Spring 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, an evening with acclaimed performance poetry duo Sister Outsider, on Tuesday, April 19. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Cat Cavern, on the second floor the University Center, and is free and open to the public.

Sister Outsider is the award-winning duo of Dominique Christina & Denice Frohman. Both Women of the World Poetry Slam Champions, the pair travel extensively to introduce students to the wider function of language and art as activism. Inspired by the life and work of Audre Lorde, they write and perform their “otherness” into the center and use spoken word as a tool for social change.

Dominique Christina is a writer, performer, educator, and activist. She holds five national titles in the three years she has been competing in slam, including the 2014 & 2012 Women of the World Slam Champion and 2011 National Poetry Slam Champion. She is the only person to have won two Women of the World Poetry Championships. She has published two poetry collections, The Bones, The Breaking, The Balm and They Are All Me.

Denice Frohman is an award-winning poet, lyricist, and educator. She is the 2013 Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion, 2014 Canto Mundo Fellow, 2012 Leeway Transformation Award recipient, and 2013 Hispanic Choice Award winner. Her work has appeared in the Huffington Post and the forthcoming book, Jotas: An Anthology of Queer Latina Voices. Her debut spoken word album, Feels Like Home was released in 2013.

Get a taste of Sister Outsider performing here: http://www.sisteroutsiderpoetry.com/poems

This event is sponsored by the Department of English, Students for Feminism, and the Hallie Ford Chair in Writing.

Scott Nadelson
English Department, Willamette University


2016 Edible Book Festival Results

5th Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our fifth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on April 1st 2016, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners who each won a nifty mug:  Joni Roberts, Carol Drost, KayLyn Stirton and Yasmine Robles, Leslie Whitaker, and Dillon Peck.  The exhibits were all deliciously inspired!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event. Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 20152014, 2013, and 2012. For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
09-frosting
“Frosting the Doughman”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
“Frosty the Snowman”
Punniest
06-mandarines “The Mandarins

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
Simone de Beauvoir’s
“The Mandarins”
Most Literary
16-war “War(heads)
and Peas”

Created by
Kaylyn Stirton &
Yasmine Robles
Inspired by
Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Best Student Entry
03-boys The Boys in
the Boat

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Daniel Brown’s
“The Boys in the Boat”
Most Creative
02-marzipan
“The Mars-ipan”

Created by
Dillon Peck
Inspired by
Andy Weir’s
“The Martian”
People’s Choice

 

Other Entries ……………………………..
01-salt “The Salt in Our Stars”

Created by
Audrey Nieswandt
Inspired by
John Green’s
“The Fault in Our Stars”
04-remains “The Remains of the
Day(Night Donuts)”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Kazuo Ishiguro
“The Remains of the Day”
05-three-musketeers “Western Canon”

Created by
Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by
Alexandre Dumas’
“Western Literature:
Three Musketeers”
07-two-cities “It was the Best of Times,
It was the Wurst of Times”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Charles Dicken’s
“A Tale of Two Cities”
08-dirt
“The Good Earth”

Created by
Paul Meuse
Inspired by
Pearl S. Buck’s
“The Good Earth”
10-none
“And Then There
Were None”

Created by
Allison Johnson
Inspired by
Agatha Christie’s
“And Then There Were None”
11-water
“Like Water for Chocolate”

Created by
Allison Johnson
Inspired by
Laura Esquivel’s
“Like Water for Chocolate”
12-gas
“Gone with the Wind: Remembrance of
Things Passed”

Created by
Al Furtwangler
Inspired by
Margaret Mitchell’s
“Remembrance of Things Past
and Gone with the Wind”
13-waldo “Pears Waldo”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
Martin Handford’s
“Where’s Waldo”
14-fish “A String in the Carp”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Nancy Bond’s
“A String in the Harp”
15-bread “Bride and Bread Juices”

Created by
Doreen Simonsen
Inspired by
Jane Austen’s
“Pride and Prejudice”
17-bottles “The Naked Lunch”

Created by
Jason Yelle
Inspired by
William S. Burroughs’
“The Naked Lunch”
18-walk “The Ones Who Walk
Away from the Omelets”

Created by
Bistro
Inspired by
Ursula K. Le Guin’s
“The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”

Faculty Colloquium: The Alexander Technique

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 8th at 3 pm. in the Room 145 of Fine Arts West (Use West Entrance that faces Goudy Hall) for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.Anita King

Anita King, Professor of Music Emerita, Piano

Title: The Alexander Technique: How Our Daily Activities Can Make Us Freer!

Abstract: The Alexander Technique is a simple and practical method for improving ease and freedom of movement, balance, support, and improved coordination. Practice of the Technique refines and heightens kinesthetic sensitivity, offering people a fluid and lively control of their movement. It provides a means whereby the use of a part–a voice or an arm or a leg–is improved by improving the use of the whole body, indeed, the whole self. These benefits are accomplished through a process of self-observation where one becomes intimately aware of one’s movement habits so that one can suspend habitual, often unconscious, muscular tightening where it exists and gradually, consciously, replace it with constructive behavior.

I will lead participants in explorations and activities designed to shed light on several topics related to coordinate movement (and yes, sitting, standing and speaking are movement activities!). These include: becoming more fully embodied by waking up the tactile and kinesthetic senses; sitting and standing with ease by taking full advantage of the weight-bearing capacity of the bony structure; maintaining full-stature by eliminating the distorting effects of unnecessary muscular effort (tension); avoiding isolation and overworking of individual parts by keeping them in continuous relation to the whole body.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Edible Book Festival, April 1st

Do you like food? Books? How about edible books? The library is hosting its fifth annual Edible Book Festival in the Hatfield Room on April 1st, and you are invited to participate!

“War and Peas” by Alice French

“War and Peas” by Alice French

An edible book is a dish inspired by any book, whether your inspiration be the title, the characters in it, plot points, or really anything. The only limits on your creation are that it must be made of mostly food and must be inspired by a book of some kind. We’ll have an example on display in the library soon, or you can check here for examples and inspiration to get your creativity flowing!

If you find yourself with a brilliant idea, bring your edible book to the Hatfield Room between 8:00am and 1:00pm on April 1st. We are excited to see more of your wonderful creations this year!

Drop off entries by 1pm in the Hatfield Room.

8-1pm and 2-4:30pm – Public voting & viewing times

1-2pm – Judging panel votes

4:30pm – Awards ceremony & light refreshments

Prizes will be awarded for the People’s Choice, the Most Literary, the Most Creative, the Punniest, and the Best Student Entry.

Please contact Carol Drost for any questions at cdrost@willamette.edu (503-370-6715).  The following link opens a PDF poster which contains all of the details of the upcoming event: ediblebooks-poster.pdf

edible-book-festival-2016-lg


Sarah Sentilles and Rick Barot Readings

Please join us for the second event of the Spring 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University: a reading by Sarah Sentilles and Rick Barot, on Wednesday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. The event is free and open to the public, and books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

 

Sarah Sentilles is a nonfiction writer, scholar of religion, critical theorist, and author of three books, including her recent memoir Breaking Up with God: A Love Story. She earned a bachelor’s degree at Yale and master’s and doctoral degrees at Harvard. At the core of her scholarship, writing, and activism is a commitment to investigating the roles language, images, and practices play in oppression, violence, social transformation, and justice movements. She is currently the Mark and Melody Teppola Presidential Distinguished Visiting Professor at Willamette University, teaching courses in religious studies, art, and creative writing. In 2016-17, she will be Chair of the MA in Critical Theory + Creative Research at Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland. She is currently working on a book about art and war titled Draw Your Weapons.

 

Poet Rick Barot is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently Chord (2015), currently a finalist for the PEN Open Book Award for best book of the year by a writer of color. Born in the Philippines and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, he attended Wesleyan University, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and Stanford University, where he was a Stegner Fellow in Poetry and later a Jones Lecturer in Poetry. Barot’s first collection of poetry, The Darker Fall(2002), received the Kathryn A. Morton Prize in Poetry. His second collection, Want(2008), was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Awards and won the 2009 Grub Street Book Prize. His poems and essays have appeared in the New RepublicPoetry, the Kenyon Review, the Virginia Quarterly Review, and others. The recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, Barot has taught at numerous universities including Stanford, California College of the Arts, George Washington University, and Lynchburg College. He currently resides in Tacoma, Washington, and teaches at Pacific Lutheran University.

 

Read an interview with Sarah here: http://religiondispatches.org/ibreaking-up-with-godi-i-didnt-lose-my-faith-i-left-it/

And read Rick’s poem “Tarp” here: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poem/245802

Scott Nadelson


Faculty Colloquium: Geologic Carbon Storage

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, February 5th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Burt Thomas, Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental and Earth ScienceBurt Thomas

Title: Geologic Carbon Storage: A Climate Salve with Some Nasty Side Effects

Abstract:

Geological Carbon Storage (GCS) is the world’s best hope of mitigating carbon dioxide emissions over the next few decades as global economies transition away from fossil energy sources. GCS refers to a variety of strategies that involve capturing carbon dioxide before it is released into the atmosphere and permanently storing it in geological reservoirs. Over the next 100 years, the lion’s share of carbon mitigation is expected to involve industrial scale GCS. Industrial methods are based primarily on the lessons-learned and expertise of the US oil industry that has routinely used carbon dioxide injection to enhance oil recovery in depleted oilfields. I will discuss the risks and consequences of our Nation’s oil-dependent GCS trajectory and argue for the need for municipal-based low-risk storage options.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators