Fred Moten Reading

Please join us for the second event in the Spring 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University, a reading by Fred Moten, acclaimed poet and scholar of African American literature and culture. The reading will take place on Wednesday, March 8, at 4:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. The event is free and open to the public.

Fred Moten, Professor of English, U of California

is the author of eight volumes of poetry, including The Feel Trio, a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of a California Book Award. His most recent collections include, The Little Edges, published by Wesleyan University Press in 2015, and The Service Porch, published by Letter Machine Editions in 2016; his scholarly books include In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition, and The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study, coauthored with Stefano Harney. He teaches at the University of California, Riverside.

In 2009, Moten was recognized as one of ten “New American Poets” by the Poetry Society of America. Poet and nonfiction author Maggie Nelson writes of his work, “With insistence, music, and a measured softness, Fred Moten’s poems construct idiosyncratic, critical canons that invite our research and repay our close attention. … It is hard to make poetry that shimmers on such an edge. Moten does so, and then some.”

Read Moten’s poem “The Salve Trade” here: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/53480

And read a recent interview here: http://lithub.com/an-interview-with-fred-moten-pt-i/

(Image source: http://english.ucr.edu/people/faculty/fred-moten)
(Text source: Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing; Department Chair of English)


Faculty Colloquium: An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, February 24th at 3 pm. in the EATON 425 for our fourth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. (Please note the change in location) Treats will be provided.

Inga Johnson, Professor of Mathematics

Title: An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory

As part of my last sabbatical, my collaborator, Allison Henrich, and I completed our book An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory (published by Dover, January 2017). Our text is unique not because of the mathematics that it contains, but rather due to the pedagogy it employs. We have designed the book to be used in an inquiry-based setting where students independently figure out, derive, and create many of the major results of knot theory while using our book as a guide. The book contains definitions, exercises, and statements of theorems, but the proofs and arguments that underlie the theory are left for readers to develop as they progress through the text. This active-learning pedagogy places the students ideas and arguments as the centerpiece of the course. As a result, class meetings include little to no lecture but are instead filled with student presentations followed by a process of questions and vetting by their peers.

In my talk I will discuss the following questions: what is the difference between math research and writing a mathematical book? How does an inquiry-based course compare to a “traditional” mathematics course? What goes into planning and managing an inquiry-based course, and how does one create inquiry-based activities? What is knot theory, and why is it a good topic for inquiry-based pedagogy? I will also discuss current research on student outcomes when inquiry-based methods are used and how those outcomes compare to non-inquiry-based courses.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Prosody and Time in Musical Settings of Emily Dickinson

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, February 10th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Marva Duerksen, Associate Professor of Music, Women’s & Gender Studies

Title: Prosody and Time in Musical Settings of Emily Dickinson

Musical settings of Emily Dickinson’s poems—some 3,000 by one collector’s reckoning—comprise a core component of the American art-song repertory and a sustained and wide-ranging constituent of her reception. That said, a mutually insightful conversation between musical and literary scholarly communities lies largely untapped, most especially in that facet of Dickinson’s poems that she herself highlights conspicuously and that constitutes a shared concern in both poetry and music: prosody, and its companion, time.

Several questions arise: how can literary prosodic method inform analysis of musical settings of her works? And, what insights can composers offer the literary community as they interpret the poet’s rhythmic and metric designs? More specifically, how do composers execute in music signal elements of Dickinson’s prosody—the familiar “dash,” a startling approach to rhyme, disruptions of conventional grammar, and idiosyncratic lineation? Then, how do composers’ renderings of such features through specially tempered rhythmic pacing, multi-layered rhythmic designs, and heterogeneous musical vocabularies in turn impact our comprehension of the disruptions endemic to her work? Finally, how can these analyses inform the categories of time—diachronic and synchronic—vital to Dickinson’s poetic project? Exploring these questions through literary models and musical settings by composers Ernst Bacon, Vincent Persichetti, and Niccoló Castiglioni provides a starting point for the dialogue proposed here.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Hallie Ford Literary Series, David Shields

Please join us for the first event of the Spring 2017 Hallie Ford Literary Series, a reading by acclaimed essayist David Shields on Thursday, February 2, at 7:30 p.m. The event takes place in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s Hatfield Library and is free and open to the public. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

David Shields is the internationally bestselling author of twenty books, including Reality Hunger: A Manifesto (named one of the best books of 2010 by more than thirty publications), The Thing About Life Is That One Day You’ll Be Dead (New York Times bestseller), and Black Planet (finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award). Just published is War Is Beautiful (powerHouse, November 2015), a critical examination of war photography in the New York Times. His newest book, Other People: Takes & Mistakes, is forthcoming from Knopf in February 2017. The recipient of Guggenheim and NEA fellowships, Shields has published essays and stories in the New York Times MagazineHarper’sEsquireYale ReviewVillage VoiceSalonSlateMcSweeney’s, and Believer. His work has been translated into twenty languages.

In his review of Reality Hunger in the New York TimesLuc Sante calls Shields “a benevolent and broad-minded revolutionary, urging a hundred flowers to bloom, toppling only the outmoded and corrupt institutions. His book may not presage sweeping changes in the immediate future, but it probably heralds what will be the dominant modes in years and decades to come.”

Read the whole review here: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/14/books/review/Sante-t.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Or watch David interviewed by Stephen Colbert here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/15/stephen-colbert-author-in_n_538869.html


Faculty Colloquium: Alexander Rocklin

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this week, Friday, December 9th at 3 pm. in the Library Instruction Room for final Faculty Colloquium of this semester. (Rescheduled from original date of November 11th.) Treats will be provided.

Alexander Rocklin, Visiting Assistant Professor of Religious Studies

Title: Race, Religion, and the Magic of Secularism in Antebellum AmericaAlexander Rocklin

Come meet the Fakir of Ava, the unrivaled magician and necromancer who will perform scientific illustrations showing through practical experiments the impositions of the Pagan Priesthood ancient and modern! Taking as my example the magician the Fakir of Ava, this talk examines the mid-19th century spectacle of stage-magic performances as a mode of popular secularism in the United States. If we understand secularism not simply as an inevitable political project but what John Modern calls a “conceptual environment” that makes the category religion a self-evident way of dividing up the world, this paper examines one mode through which the religious and the not-religious were naturalized for Americans. Taking religion and race as defined together, I will also analyze the ways in which popular secularism created particular racial-religious hierarchies that drew on and connected Americas to broader trends in colonial knowledge production across the globe. Prepare to be Amazed (or at least educated)!

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Annual Tree of Giving Book Drive

The annual Tree of Giving Book Drive has officially begun.

The Hatfield Library, The Willamette Store and the Bistro are seeking donations of new or slightly used children’s books to be donated to Swegle Elementary School‘s library. We also encourage you to donate hats, gloves and scarves for students at Swegle.

The last day to donate is Tuesday, December 20. Items can be dropped off at The Willamette Store, Hatfield Library, Bistro or Sparks Athletic Center.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask. Attached is an image of the poster for distribution on social media.

Thank you for your support!

 

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(Update January 4th, 2017)

Thank you for your support of the 2016 Tree of Giving Book Drive sponsored by the Mark O. Hatfield Library, the Willamette Store and the Bistro. We collected 171 books, 20 pairs of gloves, 6 scarves and 4 hats. The books will be added to Swegle Elementary School’s library and the gloves, scarves and hats will be distributed by the employees and teachers to students in need.

Again, thank you for your continued support and we look forward to the 2017 book drive.


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Gary Ferguson

Please join us for the second event in the Fall 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette: a reading and discussion of contemporary issues in environmental movements by acclaimed science and nature writer Gary Ferguson on Wednesday, October 12. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public. Books will be available courtesy of the Willamette Store. This event is sponsored by the Learning by Creating Program and the Green Fund.garyferguson

Author of 22 books on science and nature, including the award-winning Hawk’s Rest, published by National Geographic Adventure Press, Gary Ferguson serves as a keynote presenter at conservation and outdoor education gatherings around the country. Over the past twenty five years Gary has traveled thousands of miles down the rivers, trails, and back roads of North America: trekking 500 miles through Yellowstone to write Walking Down the Wild (Simon & Schuster), wandering through the seasons with the first 14 wolves released into Yellowstone National Park for The Yellowstone Wolves: The First Year (Globe Pequot), spending a season in the field at a wilderness therapy program for the best-selling Shouting at the Sky (St. Martin’s Press). His most recent book, The Carry Home, is both a moving celebration of the outdoor life shared between Gary and his wife Jane, who died tragically in a canoeing accident in northern Ontario in 2005, and a chronicle of grief and the healing power of wilderness.carry-home

Gary will be joined by his partner Dr. Mary Clare, an internationally-known scholar whose work in social and cultural psychology and community health initiatives has recently involved environmental justice work with the National Parks and wilderness-based programs for returning veterans. Together they will discuss the shortfalls of modern environmentalism in the twentieth century and new opportunities to bridge environmental and social justice movements.

Listen to an interview with Gary on Oregon Public Broadcasting’s Think Out Loud here: http://www.opb.org/radio/programs/thinkoutloud/segment/gary-ferguson-talks-about-the-carry-home/

For more information, contact:
Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Willamette University
snadelso@willamette.edu
503-370-6290


Alumni Weekend Events

We have a few events that will be held in the Hatfield Library during Alumni Weekend, Sept 22-25.  All are invited to attend and participate, and we hope to see you there! The link to the full schedule is:
http://willamette.edu/alumni/activities/alumni_weekend/schedule/index.html

FRIDAY, Sept 23rd

HATFIELD LIBRARY TOUR

9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
Join alumni for a tour of the Hatfield Library and a special presentation from University Archives. Stick around after the tour for the session, “Willamette’s Political Papers Collection.”
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Circulation Desk (1st Floor)

 

WILLAMETTE’S POLITICAL PAPERS COLLECTION
10:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Willamette University has a long tradition of educating politically and civically engaged leaders. But did you know WU’s Archives and Special Collections has a significant Political Archive documenting some of the most important regional and national legislation of the late 20th century? Join the Politics Department and Archives Department for a conversation centering on significant environmental legislation with former U.S. congressional leaders including Mike Kopetski and Bob Packwood ’54 (whose congressional papers are housed in WU’s archives) and learn why these collections are invaluable in helping us tell our collective story.
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

 

THE EVOLUTION OF WILLAMETTE’S ARCHITECTURAL AND NATURAL LANDSCAPE
1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
Curious to know how Willamette’s campus evolved from a single building in a field to the beautiful setting we appreciate today? Come hear public historian Dr. William F. Willingham ’66 as he shares information that he has accumulated while researching Willamette’s architectural and natural landscape for his forthcoming book on the subject.
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

FRIDAY, Sept 23rd

THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF ELECTIONS AMERICAN STYLE
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Join Professor Melissa Michaux, Politics, for this discussion: Elections are supposed to be the vehicle to transcribe voter preferences into action, set an agenda for a governing majority and reassure Americans that we live in a democracy where the will of the people are expressed. Many features of modern American elections make these goals difficult. What should voters expect from American elections? What are they likely to get?
Mark O. Hatfield Library, Hatfield Room (2nd floor)

 


Brings Plenty Opens 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series

Poet, musician, and filmmaker Trevino L. Brings Plenty will open the 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series on Thursday, September 15 at 7:30 p.m. He is the author of two full-length volumes of poetry, Wakpá Wanáği, Ghost River and Real Indian Junk Jewelry. Trevino Brings PlentyHis work has also been included in the collection Shedding Skins: Four Sioux Poets. A Lakota Indian born on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in South Dakota, Trevino explores in a variety of media American Indian identity and urban Indian life. He is a singer/songwriter and guitarist with the ensemble Ballads of Larry Drake, and he has read and performed his poetry from Portland, Oregon, to Amman, Jordan. About Trevino’s most recent book, the poet and novelist Sherman Alexie writes, “These poems are ‘porcupine quills,’ beautiful and sharp. They draw blood. They make me laugh and cry. I love this book.”

The event is free and open to the public. Books will be for sale, courtesy of the Willamette Store.

For more information, contact:
Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Willamette University
snadelso@willamette.edu
503-370-6290


Fall Semester Hours

We will continue our shortened building hours throughout the week of August 22nd (8 am – 5 pm).  On Saturday we will be open 10-4pm, but closed all day Sunday.  Monday, August 29, the first day of class, our hours will extend to 8 am – Midnight.

Our full semester hours will begin Monday, August 5th (7:45 am – 2 am) weekdays, Saturdays (10 am – 9 pm), and Sundays (10 am – 2 am).

Details at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar/

 

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(Image source: Pixabay.com)