2015 EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL

The Mark O. Hatfield Library invites you to participate in the fourth annual EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!

Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Hatfield Room.edible-books-2015

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

Some of last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle Public Library and Duke University, or check out flickr. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Free to enter– no registration required. Drop off your entry in the Hatfield Room on March 11 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book until 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

All entries will be on display from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Even if you don’t enter, you can cast a vote for your favorite edible book. At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges– Mike Chasar (English), Karen Wood (University Chaplain), and Kaitlen McPherson (CLA student) — will announce the prizes for:

Best Student Entry

Most Literary

Most Creative

Punniest

People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners. To view all photos of last year’s entries, go to:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2014/03/20/edible-book-festival-results-2014/

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu

Last year’s winners:

Award Winners
war-and-peas2 “War and Peas”

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
People’s Choice
pitcher-dory-gray “Pitcher of Dory in Gray

Created by Emily Wetherford
Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s
Portrait of Dorian Gray”
Best Student Entry
dune He Who Controls the
Spice Controls the Universe

Created by Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by Frank Herbert’s
“Dune”
Most Creative
war-and-peas War and Peas

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Most Literary
wholey-bible2 The Hole-y Bible

Created by Anna Corner
Inspired by “The Holy Bible”
Punniest

Dining with the Dead

You are invited to join the Center for Ancient Studies and Archaeology and the Salem Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, this coming Thursday, February 19 for DINING WITH THE DEAD New Discoveries in Early Byzantine Sicily.  For additional information, please go to DINING WITH THE DEAD.  This event is free and open to the public.
Please note the location for this event is the Hatfield Room of the Mark O. Hatfield Library at 7:30pm.
dining-with-the-dead

Musicality, Metaphor & Metonym

The Department of Art invites you to view “Musicality, Metaphor & Metonymy: Paintings by Tim Timmerman”, this semester’s exhibition in the Roger W. Rogers Gallery.

Timmerman’s paintings narrate the events and dynamics of his own friendships. Timmerman PaintingHe does so by physically creating small, assemblage characters (often using toys and figurines), which he then casts as protagonists and antagonists in the painted dramas that he stages and paints to illuminate, symbolically and allegorically, the dynamics of real relationships. His work shows us that we are most human in our friendships because we enact the full and messy spectrum of our humanity in these close relationships, which cast both our virtues and our frailties in high relief.

More information about the exhibition is available on the Roger W. Rogers Gallery’s website: http://www.willamette.edu/cla/arts/get_involved/exhibitions/rogers/timmerman.html

The Rogers Gallery is located in the Rogers Music Hall. The exhibition will be open to the public until May 17, 2015.

Regards,

Andries Fourie (curator, Roger W. Rogers Gallery)


Improvised Music and Dance: “Noru Ka Soru Ka”

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, November 14th at 3:00 pm in FORD 122 for the seventh Faculty Colloquium of this year. (Please note the change of location).

Our speaker will be: Mike Nord, Associate Professor of Music Technology and Music Education

Title: Improvised Music and Dance: Noru Ka Soru Ka and Other New WorkNoru Ka Soru Ka

Abstract: Noru Ka Soru Ka is an international dance-theater and music ensemble featuring Japanese dancers Mao Arata and Makoto Matsushima (also voice), American Mike Nord on guitar and electronics, and Swiss percussionist Georg Hofmann. Friday’s colloquium will present the ensemble’s approach to collective improvisation and feature video recordings of recent performances in the US, Switzerland, and Hong Kong, along with material from a 2013 CD release.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Annual Tree of Giving 2014

treegiving1Items are starting to come in already for the Tree of Giving Book Drive!  We are supporting both Grant and Bush Elementary schools this year, so we are looking forward to strong community support and abundant book donations. Some key things to remember as we approach the final Drive date on December 17th:

- 25% discount at the Willamette Store for Book Drive books

- K-5 Spanish and English language books are needed

- No holiday-themed books, please

- Gloves, hats, and cash for books are also desired

- Drop off locations include the Circulation Desk in the Hatfield Library, the Willamette Store, and the Sparks Center

- For more info visit: http://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving

Please visit our Tree of Giving located near the entrance of the library, and see the beautiful ornaments adorning it.  For every book donated, we will add one ornament to the tree.

So think of the Book Drive as you do your Black Friday shopping!  The Mark O. Hatfield Library, Willamette Store, and Student-Athlete Advisory Committee thanks you for your support.


An Analysis of “Savage Love” Advice Columns

Please join us this Friday, November 7th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fifth Faculty Colloquium of this year. Treats will be provided to accompany this talk.

Professor Jade Aguilar from Willamette University’s Department of Sociology will present

Title: An Analysis of “Savage Love” Advice Columns.
Jade Aguilar
This presentation examines how the popular advice column, Savage Love, gives its readers mixed messages about a particular sexual act performed by heterosexual couples. Broadly, this presentation will investigate the question “does [this] act (de) stabilize heterosexual identity or, more broadly, heteronormativity?” While much work has been done investigating how “queerness” serves as a destabilizing force, heterosexuality,…has been largely ignored.


Fiction Writer: Ann Pancake

Please join us for the final event of the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a reading and talk by acclaimed novelist and story writer Ann Pancake. The event will take place on Wednesday, November 5 at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.ann-pancake

A West Virginia native, Ann Pancake is the author of the groundbreaking novel Strange as This Weather Has Been, which revolves around an Appalachian family living beneath a mountaintop removal mine. Based on real events, the novel explores the way communities and the environment are devastated by corporate greed and the insatiable demand for fossil fuels. It has drawn comparisons to John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath for its portrayal of ordinary people impacted by social and political forces out of their control and was named one of Kirkus Review’s Top Ten Fiction Books of 2007. Writer and environmental activist Wendell Berry calls it “one of the bravest novels I have ever read.”

Ann lives in Seattle and teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University. Her fiction and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies like Orion, The Georgia Review, Poets and Writers, and New Stories from the South, and her first collection of short stories, Given Ground, won the 2000 Bakeless award. She has also received a Whiting Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her new story collection, Me and My Daddy Listen to Bob Marley, is forthcoming from Counterpoint Press in February 2015.

Read Ann’s essay, “Creative Responses to Worlds Unraveling,” an argument for fiction as a tool of political advocacy, here: http://garev.uga.edu/fall13/pancake.html.

And read an interview with her here: http://willowsprings.ewu.edu/interviews/pancake.pdf.

Scott Nadelson
Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Department of English


Faculty Colloquium: The Haunting Resurrection of Spanish Silent Cinema

Please join us this Friday, October 31st at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fifth Faculty Colloquium of this year. Treats will be provided to accompany this Halloween related talk.

Our speaker will be: Anna Cox, Assistant Professor, Spanish and Film Studies

Title: The Haunting Resurrection of Spanish Silent Cinema in Pablo Berger’s Blancanieves/Snow White (2012)

Abstract: Pablo Berger’s Blancanieves/Snow White (2012) retells the Brothers Grimm’s fairytale in the form of a black-and-white silent movie set in 1920s Spain. Berger’s project is a revival of time and place. In the digital age, it participates in the resurrection of early cinematic practices by filmmakers in and out of Hollywood. In Spain, it joins cultural production grappling with identity and “haunting” memory.Haunting

In this interactive presentation, I propose that the movie’s core theme is Spanish national instability, not just in the period depicted, but through time as it is represented in the movie’s reiterative imagery and sound. I argue that this way of engaging with the movie unlocks its cathartic potential for several generations of Spaniards.

DVD available at Mark O. Hatfield Library AV Video (DVD) (PN1995.9.S5 B5833 2013).

We look forward to seeing you there.


Rising to the Climate Challenge

Please join us this Friday, October 24th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fourth Faculty Colloquium of this year.

Our speaker will be:

Sue Koger, Professor of Psychology

Title: Rising to the Climate Challenge: Insights from Psychological Research

Sue Koger

Abstract: Despite increasing societal rhetoric about environmental sustainability, many relevant behaviors remain unchanged. I argue that this is because effective and sustainable solutions to climate change and other “environmental” problems require an understanding of the human (i.e., psychological) influences that created the problems in the first place, and that maintain the status quo. In this talk, I’ll describe some of the barriers to change, as well as strategies for overcoming them — both as individuals and collectively.


Hallie Ford Literary Series: a New Voices Showcase

Please join us for the second event in the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series: a New Voices Showcase, featuring readings by poet Jennifer Richter and essayist Elena Passarello on Tuesday, October 21. The event will take place at 5 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.

 

Richter_JenJennifer Richter was awarded a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lectureship in Poetry by Stanford University, where she taught in the Creative Writing Program for four years. Her poetry collection Threshold was named a 2011 Oregon Book Award Finalist by former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky. Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Natasha Trethewey chose Threshold as winner of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry Open Competition.

Listen to Jennifer read one of her poems here: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/weekly-poem-prayer-for-the-hanoi-man-who-waits-for-breakdowns-on-his-block/

elena-passarelloElena Passarello’s essays on pop culture, music, the performing arts, and the natural world have appeared in Slate, Creative Nonfiction, Normal School, Ninth Letter, and the Iowa Review, among other publications. Her debut nonfiction collection, Let Me Clear My Throat (Sarabande 2012), explores the human voice in popular performance, and she co-wrote a series of devised nonfiction monologues for the 2012 music writing anthology Pop When the World Falls Apart (Duke University Press). A recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts, and the University of Iowa Museum of Art, she teaches at Oregon State University.

And read an interview with Elena here: http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2012/11/28/voices-carry-an-interview-with-elena-passarello/