Improvised Music and Dance: “Noru Ka Soru Ka”

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, November 14th at 3:00 pm in FORD 122 for the seventh Faculty Colloquium of this year. (Please note the change of location).

Our speaker will be: Mike Nord, Associate Professor of Music Technology and Music Education

Title: Improvised Music and Dance: Noru Ka Soru Ka and Other New WorkNoru Ka Soru Ka

Abstract: Noru Ka Soru Ka is an international dance-theater and music ensemble featuring Japanese dancers Mao Arata and Makoto Matsushima (also voice), American Mike Nord on guitar and electronics, and Swiss percussionist Georg Hofmann. Friday’s colloquium will present the ensemble’s approach to collective improvisation and feature video recordings of recent performances in the US, Switzerland, and Hong Kong, along with material from a 2013 CD release.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Annual Tree of Giving 2014

treegiving1Items are starting to come in already for the Tree of Giving Book Drive!  We are supporting both Grant and Bush Elementary schools this year, so we are looking forward to strong community support and abundant book donations. Some key things to remember as we approach the final Drive date on December 17th:

- 25% discount at the Willamette Store for Book Drive books

- K-5 Spanish and English language books are needed

- No holiday-themed books, please

- Gloves, hats, and cash for books are also desired

- Drop off locations include the Circulation Desk in the Hatfield Library, the Willamette Store, and the Sparks Center

- For more info visit: http://libguides.willamette.edu/tree-of-giving

Please visit our Tree of Giving located near the entrance of the library, and see the beautiful ornaments adorning it.  For every book donated, we will add one ornament to the tree.

So think of the Book Drive as you do your Black Friday shopping!  The Mark O. Hatfield Library, Willamette Store, and Student-Athlete Advisory Committee thanks you for your support.


An Analysis of “Savage Love” Advice Columns

Please join us this Friday, November 7th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fifth Faculty Colloquium of this year. Treats will be provided to accompany this talk.

Professor Jade Aguilar from Willamette University’s Department of Sociology will present

Title: An Analysis of “Savage Love” Advice Columns.
Jade Aguilar
This presentation examines how the popular advice column, Savage Love, gives its readers mixed messages about a particular sexual act performed by heterosexual couples. Broadly, this presentation will investigate the question “does [this] act (de) stabilize heterosexual identity or, more broadly, heteronormativity?” While much work has been done investigating how “queerness” serves as a destabilizing force, heterosexuality,…has been largely ignored.


Fiction Writer: Ann Pancake

Please join us for the final event of the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a reading and talk by acclaimed novelist and story writer Ann Pancake. The event will take place on Wednesday, November 5 at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.ann-pancake

A West Virginia native, Ann Pancake is the author of the groundbreaking novel Strange as This Weather Has Been, which revolves around an Appalachian family living beneath a mountaintop removal mine. Based on real events, the novel explores the way communities and the environment are devastated by corporate greed and the insatiable demand for fossil fuels. It has drawn comparisons to John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath for its portrayal of ordinary people impacted by social and political forces out of their control and was named one of Kirkus Review’s Top Ten Fiction Books of 2007. Writer and environmental activist Wendell Berry calls it “one of the bravest novels I have ever read.”

Ann lives in Seattle and teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University. Her fiction and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies like Orion, The Georgia Review, Poets and Writers, and New Stories from the South, and her first collection of short stories, Given Ground, won the 2000 Bakeless award. She has also received a Whiting Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her new story collection, Me and My Daddy Listen to Bob Marley, is forthcoming from Counterpoint Press in February 2015.

Read Ann’s essay, “Creative Responses to Worlds Unraveling,” an argument for fiction as a tool of political advocacy, here: http://garev.uga.edu/fall13/pancake.html.

And read an interview with her here: http://willowsprings.ewu.edu/interviews/pancake.pdf.

Scott Nadelson
Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Department of English


Faculty Colloquium: The Haunting Resurrection of Spanish Silent Cinema

Please join us this Friday, October 31st at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fifth Faculty Colloquium of this year. Treats will be provided to accompany this Halloween related talk.

Our speaker will be: Anna Cox, Assistant Professor, Spanish and Film Studies

Title: The Haunting Resurrection of Spanish Silent Cinema in Pablo Berger’s Blancanieves/Snow White (2012)

Abstract: Pablo Berger’s Blancanieves/Snow White (2012) retells the Brothers Grimm’s fairytale in the form of a black-and-white silent movie set in 1920s Spain. Berger’s project is a revival of time and place. In the digital age, it participates in the resurrection of early cinematic practices by filmmakers in and out of Hollywood. In Spain, it joins cultural production grappling with identity and “haunting” memory.Haunting

In this interactive presentation, I propose that the movie’s core theme is Spanish national instability, not just in the period depicted, but through time as it is represented in the movie’s reiterative imagery and sound. I argue that this way of engaging with the movie unlocks its cathartic potential for several generations of Spaniards.

DVD available at Mark O. Hatfield Library AV Video (DVD) (PN1995.9.S5 B5833 2013).

We look forward to seeing you there.


Rising to the Climate Challenge

Please join us this Friday, October 24th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fourth Faculty Colloquium of this year.

Our speaker will be:

Sue Koger, Professor of Psychology

Title: Rising to the Climate Challenge: Insights from Psychological Research

Sue Koger

Abstract: Despite increasing societal rhetoric about environmental sustainability, many relevant behaviors remain unchanged. I argue that this is because effective and sustainable solutions to climate change and other “environmental” problems require an understanding of the human (i.e., psychological) influences that created the problems in the first place, and that maintain the status quo. In this talk, I’ll describe some of the barriers to change, as well as strategies for overcoming them — both as individuals and collectively.


Hallie Ford Literary Series: a New Voices Showcase

Please join us for the second event in the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series: a New Voices Showcase, featuring readings by poet Jennifer Richter and essayist Elena Passarello on Tuesday, October 21. The event will take place at 5 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public.

 

Richter_JenJennifer Richter was awarded a Wallace Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lectureship in Poetry by Stanford University, where she taught in the Creative Writing Program for four years. Her poetry collection Threshold was named a 2011 Oregon Book Award Finalist by former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky. Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Natasha Trethewey chose Threshold as winner of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry Open Competition.

Listen to Jennifer read one of her poems here: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/weekly-poem-prayer-for-the-hanoi-man-who-waits-for-breakdowns-on-his-block/

elena-passarelloElena Passarello’s essays on pop culture, music, the performing arts, and the natural world have appeared in Slate, Creative Nonfiction, Normal School, Ninth Letter, and the Iowa Review, among other publications. Her debut nonfiction collection, Let Me Clear My Throat (Sarabande 2012), explores the human voice in popular performance, and she co-wrote a series of devised nonfiction monologues for the 2012 music writing anthology Pop When the World Falls Apart (Duke University Press). A recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts, and the University of Iowa Museum of Art, she teaches at Oregon State University.

And read an interview with Elena here: http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2012/11/28/voices-carry-an-interview-with-elena-passarello/


Faculty Colloquium: Art & Science in Cacadu

Please join us this Friday, September 19th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the first Faculty Colloquium of this year. Our speaker will be Andries Fourie, Associate Professor of Art, speaking on Art & Science in Cacadu. FourieHis talk will focus on his recent mixed-media paintings and sculptures that examine the ecosystems, history and anthropology of the Cacadu District of South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province.

The work, which was produced in response to research conducted in South Africa in collaboration with Dr. David Craig of Willamette’s Biology Department and Dr. Richard Cowling of the Botany Department of the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, explores the relationships between humans, animals and plants in Cacadu’s unusually diverse ecosystems. Cacadu is home to five of South Africa’s eight vegetation biomes, including the very unique thicket biome. Besides its ecological focus, the work attempts to come to a deeper and more holistic understanding of this unique place through an exploration of issues surrounding memory, identity and the notion of belonging.


Poet: Marilyn Chin

Marilyn Chin, the award-winning author of a novel and four volumes of poetry, including Rhapsody in Plain Yellow, The Phoenix Gone, the Terrace Empty, and the newly released Hard Love Province will be the first speaker in the Fall 2014 Hallie Ford Literary Series. Born in Hong Kong and raised in Portland, Oregon, her books have become Asian American classics and are taught in classrooms all over the world.chin2 In addition to teaching in the MFA program at San Diego State University, she serves as a mentor on the international faculty of the City University of Hong Kong’s low-residency MFA program, the first of its kind in Asia. Chin’s talk will take place on Thursday, October 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. Books will be for sale, courtesy of the Willamette Store.


Laughing into the Abyss: Comedy’s Existential Howl

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 11th at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium.

Our speaker will be:

Scott Nadelson, Assistant Professor of English; Hallie Ford Chair in Writing

Title: Laughing into the Abyss: Comedy’s Existential Howlnadelson_sm

Abstract: This talk on the craft and process of narrative writing explores the relationship between comedy and lamentation. I examine work by the Coen brothers, Nikolai Gogol, and Penelope Fitzgerald—with diversions to Lenny Bruce, Sarah Silverman, Richard Pryor, and The Office—to understand how writers use comedy to wrestle with the complexities of mortality, grief, faith, and compassion. I also discuss how comedy has played a role in my own recent work.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators