2017 Faculty Works Exhibit

The Mark O. Hatfield Library has on display a number of select faculty works now through May 15th, 2017.  These displays are are located on the first floor, and consist of a number of faculty publications (books and articles), and works of art (photos and studio art).  For the first time, there is also a display which highlight video clips of a theater production. Below are a photos from this exhibit.


Ralph Barnes Correspondence Exhibit

New Exhibit Going up in the Library on March 24th, 2017

UPDATE: The date for this mini exhibit has been delayed.  Additional information will follow as they become available.  (3-24-17)

This exhibit looks at the life and experiences of Ralph Barnes a Willamette University alumni from the class of 1922. Barnes was a foreign correspondent with the New York Herald Tribune. Ralph Barnes worked in Mussolini’s Italy, Joseph Stalin’s Russia, and Adolf Hitler’s Germany. Included in this exhibit are excerpts of Barnes foreign correspondence experience.  This exhibit has been put together by Kate Kerns, our Archives and Special Collections intern.


WU Rook Caps

Our Archives and Special Collections intern Kate Kerns has put together a special mini exhibit on the first floor of the library about Rook Caps based on the materials available in the Willamette University Archives and Special Collections.  This exhibit will be replaced later this week by a new exhibit by Kate Kern, so please take a look before these items are sent back into the archives.  Below are some photos of this fun exhibit, Rook Kaps worn at Willamette, a Rook Bible, photos, and stories that center around Rook Kaps. This is a good example of some of the fun things you can find in our Archives, and what could be learned about them.


Louis Bunce: Dialogue with Modernism Exhibit

January 21 – March 26, 2017

Melvin Henderson-Rubio Gallery

The Mark O. Hatfield Library will exhibit a few Modernism art works created by Portland artist Louis Bunce through March 26th, 2017.  Also included in this exhibit are a collection of books from our stacks on the topic of Modernism in the arts, all of which are available to check out.

(From the Hallie Ford Museum of Art’s blog post…)

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art is pleased to present a major retrospective exhibition for Louis Bunce (1907-1983), a legendary Portland painter, printmaker, and teacher who taught at the Museum Art School from 1946 to 1972 and who influenced several generations of Oregon artists. Organized by Professor Emeritus of Art History and Senior Faculty Curator Roger Hull, the exhibition will chronicle the artist’s career over a 57 year period and features 49 paintings drawn from public and private collections throughout the United States.

Hull says, “Bunce was Oregon’s archetypal modern artist of the mid-twentieth century. ‘Louie,’ as he was called, was ambitious, gregarious, fun-loving, women-loving, antic and outrageous. He was deadly serious when it came to art-making and engaged with it all: Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Post-Modernism, and at the end of his life almost operatic Romanticism.”

Born in Wyoming, Bunce moved with his family to Oregon in his youth, studied at the Museum Art School for a year, and moved to New York in the late 1920s to study at the Art Students League. At the League, he met Jackson Pollock, another Wyoming native, and they established an on-going friendship that lasted until Pollock’s death. In fact, it was Bunce who introduced Pollock to artist Lee Krasner, who would eventually become Pollock’s wife. Although Bunce returned to Portland, Oregon, he maintained strong ties with many other notable artists of the New York School throughout his career.

As a painter and printmaker, Bunce was a rising star in American art of the 1940s and 1950s. In painting, his WPA work from the 1930s gave way to inventive Surrealist forms in the 1940s, to nature-based abstract expressionist work in the 1950s and 1960s. He and his work were featured in a full-color article in Life magazine in 1957, and he was represented in New York by the John Heller Gallery and the Doris Meltzer Gallery. In the 1970s, he experimented with hard-edge geometric compositions and Pop-related imagery while his last works feature light-saturated seascapes.


Lausanne Hall Through the Years

Many students have lived in Lausanne Hall throughout the years, and in celebration of this landmark campus building we have a display with numerous photos and historical descriptions.  Below are some of the photos and description plates about Lausanne Hall which will be on display until May 15th.

l2Throughout Lausanne Hall’s History, she has had many names Woman’s College, Women’s College, Lausanne Hall, and the U.S.S. Lausanne.  And the name Lausanne has been used for three different buildings.

There are some fun quotes highlighting life in Lausanne Hall, such as from the Willamette Collegian, November 11, 1909: “No more fear from fire at the Hall now.  We have a new chemical fire extinguisher and a chain-ladder fire escape. ”  Then a week later in the Collegian, “Lausanne Hall was saved from destruction by fire last Saturday by gallant efforts of Messrs. Oakes, Anderson and Booth.  As is the case with boys, they visited the kitchen afterwards.”

l3

In 1918, the old Lausanne Hall was condemned, and a song was made about its languishing condition: “There’s an old historic building, Fames in story and in song. Where the Westland’s fairest daughters Linger: may they linger long.  Old Lausanne may not look splendid, Its appearance don’t deride, it is some majestic ruin, When you view it from the inside.  (Second Chorus) Through insurance underwriters Think its fire risk is too great To Protect it by insurance. Yet it’s here we want to state Thought they call it an “Old Firetrap…”

In October of 1919, the old Lausanne Hall was razed by the Willamette “boys” and finished by professional workmen.  The old Music Building at Willamette was remodeled and temporarily used for housing for the young women at Willamette while the new home was being built.

l4

As World War II rolled around, in December of 1942 the Board of Trustees approved a plan to offer Lausanne Hall as a men’s dormitory in the event Willamette was selected as a site for a Navy or Army training unit for World War II.  In April, 1943, Willamette was selected as a site to offer the V-12 naval program and plans are made to house 150 men in Lausanne, and a few months later in July 270 men reported to Willamette University’s naval headquarters (Gatke Hall). In October 1945, the V-12 Navy program comes to an end.

L1


Youth Leadership Month

Our current display of books and DVDs are centered around Youth Leadership Month.  There are books and videos that feature strong leaders as the main characters, historical movers and shakers, as well as materials to brush up leadership skills.

All of these materials are available to check out, as always!

display-youth-leadership4

display-youth-leadership7

display-youth-leadership5

display-youth-leadership6


Thompson Exhibit

James B. Thompson: Fragments In Timejames-thompson1

January 23 – March 26, 2016

The Mark O. Hatfield Library has some art pieces by James B. Thompson on display on the first floor of the library.  This is in conjunction with the current exhibit by Thompson in the Hallie Ford Museum of Art.

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art presents a twenty-year retrospective exhibition, “Fragments in Time,” by Willamette University’s art faculty member James B. Thompson in the Melvin Henderson-Rubio Gallery.

“Fragments in Time” explores the development of Thompson’s work during thejames-thompson3 past two decades, and features 179 artworks that range through 11 series, starting with Thompson’s “Certain Situations” from the mid-1990s, to his most recent “Forgotten Biography of Tools” from 2015. Utilizing various mediums — including mixed-media, painting, intaglio prints, embossed paper and kiln-formed glass — Thompson focuses on his various interests in ancient history, golf, changing landscapes, life in a French village and even hand tools, by incorporating  fragmented references to these in his art making process.

Portland, Oregon art writer and critic Bob Hicks says, “In keeping with his theory of a fragmented universe, Thompson creates situations in his art, but not stories: juxtapositions, suggestions, leftover objects and ideas. Then like a collagist of objects and ideas alike, he creates something new.”

In addition to the objects on display in the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, the exhibition is accompanied by a full-color, 128 page book by Portland, Oregon art writer and critic Bob Hicks.

james-thompson4The images included on this page are just a few items on display in the Hatfield Library, which includes a selection of related books from the library’s general collection (books on display can be checked out).

More information is available on the Hallie Ford Museum of Art web site:
https://willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2015-16/james_b_thompson.html

 

Thompson136

james-thompson2


Escape Fiction Display

escape-from-fiction-wu-reads-displayThroughout the month of January we will have up a display of fiction movies and books from our general collection.  There are classics and newbies to browse through.  The display is located on the first floor of the library, and all materials in it are available to be checked out.

Here are just a few titles that are in the temporary display:

DVDs

Astro Boy
The Mists of Avalon
Alien
Blade Runner
My Brother is from Another Planet
Tales of Earth Sea
Castle in the Sky
Riddick
District 9
Total Recall
Melancholia
Toy Story 3
Minority Report
Invasion of the Body Snatchers

escape-from-fiction-display

BOOKS

Watchmen
Harry Potter
The Lost Heir
The Hunger Games
Ink Heart
Goblin Secrets
Boy, Snow, Bird
300
Cloud Atlas
iRobot
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
The Sword in the Stone
The Hitch Hikers Trilogy
Watership Down

 

 


Popular Reading Collection Suggestions

If you’re going away for Thanksgiving or staying close to campus, why not grab a great book from our Popular Reading Collection which is near the elevator. Here are just a few of the over 350 titles we have to consider:

The lord of Opium
Nancy Farmer, PZ7.F23814 Lor 2013
In 2137, fourteen-year-old Matt is stunned to learn that, as the clone of El Patrón, he is expected to take over as leader of the corrupt drug empire of Opium, where there is also a hidden cure for the ecological devastation faced by the rest of the world.

Eat to live cookbook: 200 delicious nutrient-rich recipes for fast and sustained weight loss, reversing disease, and lifelong health
Joel Fuhrman, RM222.2 .F8395 2013
Filled with nutritious, delicious, and easy-to-prepare recipes for every occasion, the Eat to Live Cookbook shows you how to follow Dr. Fuhrman’s life-changing program as you eat your way to incredible health.

Code name Verity
Elizabeth Wein. PZ7.W4358 Cp 2012
In 1943, a British fighter plane crashes in Nazi-occupied France and the survivor tells a tale of friendship, war, espionage, and great courage as she relates what she must to survive while keeping secret all that she can
.

The brides of Rollrock Island
Margo Lanagan, PZ7.L216 Br 2012
On remote Rollrock Island, men go to sea to make their livings–and to catch their wives. The witch Misskaella knows the way of drawing a girl from the heart of a seal, of luring the beauty out of the beast. And for a price a man may buy himself a lovely sea-wife. He may have and hold and keep her. And he will tell himself that he is her master. But from his first look into those wide, questioning, liquid eyes, he will be just as transformed as she. He will be equally ensnared. And the witch will have her true payment.

Drama
Raina Telgemeier Gurihiru, PN6727.T294 D73 2012
Callie rides an emotional roller coaster while serving on the stage crew for a middle school production of Moon over Mississippi as various relationships start and end, and others never quite get going

Spontaneous Happiness
Andrew Weil, RA790 .W45 2011
In just eight weeks you will learn to influence your mood through natural, healthy means; improve your physical and mental health; discover how to sleep better; connect with others; and achieve balance and serenity.

Silver : return to Treasure Island
Andrew Motion, PR6063.O842 S55 2012b
It’s almost forty years after the events of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island:  Jim Hawkins now runs an inn called the Hispaniola on the English coast with his son, Jim, and Long John Silver has returned to England to live in obscurity with his daughter, Natty. Their lives are quiet and unremarkable; their adventures have seemingly ended.
But for Jim and Natty, the adventure is just beginning. One night, Natty approaches young Jim with a proposition: return to Treasure Island and find the remaining treasure that their fathers left behind so many years before. As Jim and Natty set sail in their fathers’ footsteps, they quickly learn that this journey will not be easy.  Immediately, they come up against murderous pirates, long-held grudges, and greed and deception lurking in every corner.

The Dog Stars (Vintage Contemporaries)
Peter Heller, PS3608.E454 D64 2012
Hig somehow survived the flu pandemic that killed everyone he knows. Now his wife is gone, his friends are dead, and he lives in the hangar of a small abandoned airport with his dog, Jasper, and a mercurial, gun-toting misanthrope named Bangley.

But when a random transmission beams through the radio of his 1956 Cessna, the voice ignites a hope deep inside him that a better life exists outside their tightly controlled perimeter. Risking everything, he flies past his point of no return and follows its static-broken trail, only to find something that is both better and worse than anything he could ever hope for.

 

For more great titles, search the library home page (the online catalog) for “popular reading” in quotes.

 

code-name


Banned Books 2015

banned-bks-2015Banned Books Week for 2015 is held Sept 27-Oct 3. Celebrate your freedom to read by reading a book from our Banned Books display, which will be on display from Sept 25th throughout October on the first floor of the library.  We encourage you to check them out!

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read.  It highlights the value of free and open access to information, and brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

FUN FACTS:

Over this past decade, 5,099 challenges were reported to the Office for Intellectual Freedom. These are the top five reasons…

1,577 challenges due to “sexually explicit” material
1,291 challenges due to “offensive language”
989 challenges due to materials deemed “unsuited to age group”
619 challenged due to “violence”‘
361 challenges due to “homosexuality”
(Source: http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10)

 

2014

The top ten most frequently challenged books last year include:

1)      The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie

Reasons: anti-family, cultural insensitivity, drugs/alcohol/smoking, gambling, offensive language, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group, violence. Additional reasons: “depictions of bullying”

2)      Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

Reasons: gambling, offensive language, political viewpoint. Additional reasons: “politically, racially, and socially offensive,” “graphic depictions”

3)      And Tango Makes Three, Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell

Reasons: Anti-family, homosexuality, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “promotes the homosexual agenda”

4)      The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison

Reasons: Sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “contains controversial issues”

5)      It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris

Reasons: Nudity, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group. Additional reasons: “alleges it child pornography”

6)      Saga, by Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples

Reasons: Anti-Family, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group. Additional reasons:

7)      The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited to age group, violence

8)      The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “date rape and masturbation”

9)      A Stolen Life, Jaycee Dugard

Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group

10)  Drama, by Raina Telgemeier

Reasons: sexually explicit

 

For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week visit the ALA Banned Books web site:

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek

Source: ALA Banned Books web site