Library News

Edible Book Festival, March 15, 2013

YOU ARE INVITED TO PARTICIPATE IN THE
SECOND ANNUAL EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!!!!

Friday, March 15, 2013

Hatfield Room
Mark O. Hatfield Library

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

 

Last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle, University of Puget Sound, and Duke University. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Drop off your entries in the Hatfield Room on March 15 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book– all entries will be on view until 4:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges—Mike Chasar (English), Hannah Elder (CLA ’13), Honey Wilson (President’s Office)—will announce the prizes for:

  • Best Student Entry
  • Most Literary
  • Most Creative
  • Punniest
  • People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners.

For questions, contact Carol Drost, 370-6715
cdrost@willamette.edu

 

The Exhibits

“Tortilla Flat”

Inspired by
Tortilla Flat
By John Steinbeck
Created by
Leslie Whitaker

“Heart of Darkness”

Inspired by
Heart of Darkness
By Joseph Conrad
Created by
Joni Roberts

“Swiss Family Rubinson”

Inspired by
Swiss Family Robinson
Created by
Carol Drost

“The Invisible Flan”

Inspired by
The Invisible Man
By H.G. Wells
Created by
Saran Walker

“The Invisible Jam”

Inspired by
The Invisible Man
By H.G. Wells
Created by
Robert Minato

“Spuds in Your Eye”

Inspired by
Suds in Your Eye
By Mary Lasswell
Created by
Alice French
“Jane Pear”

Inspired by
Jane Eyre
By Charlotte Bronte
Created by
Liz Butterfield
“Jack & the
Jelly Bean Stalk”

Inspired by
Jack & the
Bean Stalk
By Steven Kellogg
Created by
John Repplinger
“Game of Scones”

Inspired by
Game of Thrones
By George R. R. Martin
Created by
Clara Timpe
“Fall of the House
of Gushers”

Inspired by
“The Fall of the House of Ushers”
By E. A. Poe
Created by
Max H. Gurnard
“The Girl with the Dragon Tofu”

Inspired by
The Girl with the Dragon Tatto
Created by
Dylan Goldade & Brittany Chin

Viewing and Judging the Exhibits

 

Better Than Printing Tip #4: Google Drive Revisions, Comments, and Markups

Use Comments and markup tools for convenient peer editing in Google Drive.

So you’ve finally convinced Group Partner XX that Google Drive is the wave of the present and to ditch the hand-scribed project revisions every week. They’ve seen the light, but now it’s all fouled up. Someone (not naming names) has gone and deleted the best paragraph in the whole presentation (yours of course). Not only that but the group hasn’t been able to meet in over a week and no one’s made anymore changes as the due date approaches.

Get that paragraph back in the final version: no problem(and see who nuked it in the 1st place). Set up commenting so your group members can give feedback without being face-to-face: easy as pie!

The power of Google Drive goes beyond just sharing and collaborative live-editing. Google Drive has an easy-to-view revision history so you can see just who messed up that last group project,and revert to an earlier version in a snap. You can also do peer-editing & feedback with their nifty commenting tool. You can even set up notifications on the comment thread so you’ll get emailed when someone posts a comment to your doc.

Better Than Printing Tip #3 Google Docs and Track Changes


Did you know? You can share documents and papers easily with Google Drive.

It’s not just about sustainability & waste. The Better than Printing campaign is geared toward helping you choose methods that make it easier to organize and edit your documents & articles and to work collaboratively.

 

View the Tip of the Week Archive:

http://www.willamette.edu/wits/betterthanprinting/tip_of_the_week.html

Better Than Printing Tip #2: Microsoft Word Track Changes

Use MS Word markup tools like “Track Changes.” And did you know, you can also record audio comments and imbed them into your Word docs?

View the Tip of the Week Archive:

http://www.willamette.edu/wits/betterthanprinting/tip_of_the_week.html

Better Than Printing Tip #1: Adobe Rader XI Markup Tools

Tired of printing out mountains of PDF files? Standing in line at the printer getting you down? Did you know there’s some great tools available in the labs and on your PC/MAC to manipulate PDFs with?

It all starts with a free App:

  • Get the latest Adobe Reader (XI): The newest version of Adobe Reader has vastly improved markup tools. It’s also free and is pretty consistent across all platforms.Mac or PC:You can download Adobe Reader for Mac or PC here
  • http://get.adobe.com/reader/ (be sure to UNCHECK the MacAfee Security Scan offer)
  • For iPad or Android tablet:  Is available for free from their respective app stores.

Once you have Adobe Reader installed you can use some quick and easy to use features to mark up your PDF’s and view your notes across all platforms.

**many other PDF reading programs can also see the markup notes, but not all of them.

Here’s a brief video explaining how to use the markup tools of Adobe Rader XI:

 

View the Tip of the Week Archive:

http://www.willamette.edu/wits/betterthanprinting/tip_of_the_week.html

Assignment Calculator?

What is the Assignment Calculator?  And who is it for?

The assignment calculator is a simple tool that students and faculty can use to help calculate when parts of a research paper or assignment should be worked on and completed.  Basically, all you need to do is plug in the beginning date of an assignment and the due date, and it does the rest for you!

Then the calculator lists all of the steps needed to complete your assignment and when each step should be done.  Below is an example.  This is a wonderful tool to help with time management! Check out the Assignment Calculator at:

http://library.willamette.edu/rpc/

 

Facebook, Twitter & Pinterest. Oh, My!

Did you know the library has a Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest sites?  If you haven’t already, become our Facebook fan, Twitter follower, and Pinterest groupie.  Visit the Hatfield Library at:

https://www.facebook.com/Mark.O.Hatfield.Library

https://twitter.com/WU_Library

http://pinterest.com/hatfieldlibrary/

 

Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece

The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece: Greek and Roman Artworks Travel to Oregon!

Professor Ann Nicgorski, Chair & Professor of Art History and Archaeology, will lecture on The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece, Thursday, October 25th at 7:30 p.m. in the Paulus Lecture Hall at the Law School.

This fall, the Portland Art Museum is hosting a blockbuster exhibition of Greek and Roman art entitled The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece (October 6, 2012 to January 6, 2013). There are over 100 exquisite objects in this exhibit, which are all on loan from the renowned British Museum in London.

This lecture provides an overview of the exhibition with a focus on its key themes and selected, noteworthy objects, such as the iconic Discobolus, or discus-thrower, from the 5th century BCE, which will be making its first trip to the United States.  In addition to several other large-scale works of stone sculpture, the exhibit also features smaller figurines in a variety of media, as well as numerous vases with figural decoration. Key themes include the human body and face; character, portrait and realism; gods and goddesses in human form; athletes and Herakles-superman; birth, marriage, sex, and death; and composite human-animal creatures of mythological legend, such as the famous Theban sphinx.

Edward Burger: Teaching to Fail

November 1, 12:30pm – 1:30pm

This NITLE seminar will explore ways to foster creativity and risk-taking in the classroom. Note that this event will not be recorded, so registering and attending in real-time is your only option!

Summary: Although we know that creativity requires the ability to take risks and learn from failures, our students typically are risk-averse and seek to avoid failure at all costs. How then can we foster risk-taking and creativity in our students? In this seminar, Edward B. Burger, Francis Christopher Oakley Third Century Professor of Mathematics at Williams College, will explore the ultimate goals of education, how are we engineering our curriculum and classes to deliver on the promise of those lofty goals, lead a discussion to answer both questions, and celebrate the notion of “failing to succeed.”

Information about the speaker: Edward Burger is the Francis Christopher Oakley Third Century Professor of Mathematics at Williams College, an educational and business consultant, and most recently served as vice provost for strategic educational initiatives at Baylor University. He is the author of over 60 research articles, books, and video series (starring in over 3,000 on-line videos). Dr. Burger has won numerous awards, including the 2000 Northeastern Section of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2001 MAA Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo National Award for Distinguished Teaching of Mathematics, 2003 Residence Life Teaching Award from the University of Colorado at Boulder, Mathematical Association of America’s Chauvenet Prize (2004), Lester R. Ford Prize (2006), and Williams College’s Nelson Bushnell Prize for Scholarship and Teaching (2007). He also received the 2010 Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching: the largest and most prestigious prize in higher education teaching across all disciplines in the English-speaking world. He was named 2001-2003 Polya Lecturer by the MAA, and in 2007, 2008, and 2011, he received awards for his video work.

View the Full Program

Register online by Tuesday, October 30, 2012.

If you prefer a more social setting, you can also join a small group of viewers in Smullin 6. If you choose to join us there, you do not need to register.

Related Content

Three NITLE Seminars in October

FemTechNet: Networked Course on Feminism and Technology

October 4, 1:00pm – 2:00pm

Online recording available:
Recording
Presentation Slides

FemTechNet is a network of international scholars and artists activated by Alexandra Juhasz and Anne Balsamo to design, implement, and teach the first DOCC (Distributed Online Collaborative Course), a feminist rethinking of the MOOC. The course, Feminist Dialogues on Technology, will be offered in fifteen classrooms, at least one in every continent, in the Fall of 2013. This project uses technology to enable interdisciplinary and international conversation while privileging situated diversity and networked agency. Building the course on a shared set of recorded dialogues with the world’s preeminent thinkers and artists who consider technology through a feminist lens, the rest of the course will be built, and customized for the network’s local classrooms and communities, by network members who submit and evaluate Boundary Objects that Learn—the course’s basic pedagogic instruments.

FemTechNet invites interested scholars and artists to join this project and help build this course. In this seminar, Alexandra Juhasz and Anne Balsamo discuss how this innovative project got started, explore the model of distributed online collaborative courses, and lead a discussion of how FemTechNet or similar courses might fit within the liberal arts curriculum.

Full program description.

Stories of the Susquehanna: : Digital Humanities, Spatial Thinking, and Telling the historia of the Environment

October 9, 11:00am – 12:00pm

Online recording available: Stories of the Susquehanna

Collaborative student-faculty research projects centered in the locale of residential liberal arts colleges let students engage in a variety of learning experiences and high impact practices including undergraduate research, civic engagement, and multidisciplinary approaches to complex problems. Students at Bucknell University, as part of the Stories of the Susquehanna Valley Project, gathered stories from the Marcellus Shale region in the Susquehanna watershed of how the boom in natural gas drilling is transforming communities and cultural landscapes. This seminar will explore the possibilities digital humanities offers students to incorporate technologies such as ArcGIS and Google Earth into storytelling of their environment. Focusing on the full length of the Susquehanna River, Katherine Faull, Professor of German and Humanities and Alf Siewers, Associate Professor of English at Bucknell University, will provide examples and lead discussion of how students’ digital learning may foster cooperation between universities, public agencies (local, regional and national) and NGOs in successful efforts to raise environmental awareness.

Full program description.

Evaluating Digital Scholarship

October 10, 1:00pm – 2:00pm

Online recording available:
Recording
Presentation Slides

While a number of professional organizations have produced valuable guidelines for evaluation of digital work, many colleges and universities have yet to establish clear protocols and practices for applying them. Alison Byerly, College Professor and former Provost and Executive Vice President at Middlebury College, who has co-led workshops on evaluating digital scholarship at the MLA convention, will review major issues to be considered in the evaluation of digital work, such as: presentation of medium-specific materials, documentation of multiple roles in collaborative work, changing forms of peer review, and identification of appropriate reviewers. She will then talk briefly about how these issues can best be approached from the perspective of the candidate who wishes to present his or her work effectively to review committees, as well as from the perspective of colleagues who wish to provide a well-informed evaluation of such work.

Full program description.

Participation in NITLE Seminars is open to all active member institutions of the NITLE Network as a benefit of membership and as space allows. No additional registration fee applies.