Senior Humanities Seminar Guest Scholar on Walt Whitman

All are invited to the following lecture being given by Ed Folsom, the world’s foremost expert on Walt Whitman. Folsom is visiting WU as this semester’s Senior Humanities Seminar guest scholar.

Thursday, October 24, 4:15-5:15pm
“‘That towering bulge of pure white’: Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, the Capitol Dome, and Black America”
Dr. Ed Folsom
Hatfield Room

This lecture examines how Walt Whitman and Herman Melville responded to the decision to expand the national Capitol building and to crown it with a massive white dome, and it explores how the dome was perceived in racial terms as it was being built and completed.

Folsom is the Carver Professor of American Literature at the University of Iowa. An award-winning teacher and scholar, he is the author, co-author, or editor of many books including Walt Whitman: The Measure of His Song (1981), Walt Whitman’s Native Representations (1994), Walt Whitman and the World (1995), Whitman East and West: New Contexts for Reading Walt Whitman (2002), Whitman Making Books/Books Making Whitman (2005), Re-Scripting Walt Whitman (2005), and Leaves of Grass: The Sesquicentennial Essays (2007). He edits the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review and co-directs the Walt Whitman Archive (http://www.whitmanarchive.org/).

More on Folsom:

http://www.uiowa.edu/be-remarkable/portfolio/people/folsom-e.html


Sounds of Harmony: Traditional Music in the Reconstruction of Identity and Healing

Sounds of Harmony: Traditional Music in the Reconstruction of Identity and Healing/Therapy of the Modern Mind-And-Heart

The Hatfield Library will have on display bamboo musical instruments from Yunnan, China, October 26-November 3rd. Also of note, there will be a public concert on traditional Chinese music and a seminar on traditional music and identity reconstruction (details below).

2013-xhibition-Concert-Seminar

 

 


Stowell Diary Now Digitized

The Willamette University Archives is excited to announce that the diary of Janette McCalley Stowell (1847-1916), which details the everyday life of a wife and mother at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth in Portland, Oregon and Sitka, Alaska is now available online.

Janette McCalley was born in Kirkcaldy, Scotland on January 29, 1847. She came to America with her parents in 1851 and the family moved to Salem, Oregon in 1859. Janette McCalley graduated from Willamette University with a B.S. in 1865 and taught for a time in the Preparatory Course at Willamette University. She married George Stowell on February 20, 1870 in Springfield, Oregon. She and George had four children.resolver

By 1888, the Stowell family had moved to Corbett Street in Portland, Oregon. In January, 1890, Janette Stowell began a diary which she kept, in an irregular fashion, until 1906. She died on February 4, 1916, and was survived by her husband, and three of her four children.
Stowell’s diary details the everyday life of a wife and mother at the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth. She writes of keeping a garden and growing flowers, caring for her children, entertaining friends, going to church and her involvement in a branch of the Chautauqua Institute.

In February of 1890 the Portland area experienced a damaging flood which covered Ross Island and washed away many buildings and homes. Mrs. Stowell describes walking to where the family could see the flood waters covering Ross Island and watching debris pile up at the Ross Island Bridge.

In the late 1890s she joined a reading club and was more involved in growing roses. By 1900, after a break in the diary of two years, she reports the family is in Sitka, Alaska where her husband is working. The final entry in the diary is for August 25, 1906.


New “Summit” Library System

Big changes are in store for Willamette University. Starting in June 2013 the movement from 37 to one begins. We are moving with our Summit partner libraries from 37 stand-alone library systems to one shared system to improve the research experience for our students and faculty and to better manage our resources. The popular library system you have used to search for information and borrow library materials is being replaced by a new, improved user interface which will make it easier for you to find the information you need and get the items you are looking for both here at Willamette and through Summit.

Willamette University is a member of the Orbis Cascade Alliance, a consortium of 37 academic libraries across Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. The Alliance is the engine behind Summit but it is not the only initiative on which the 37 libraries collaborate. As a group, we are working toward unlocking opportunities that will help us to build our collections as a single collection, share services and resources, and exploit new technologies. This move from 37 to one will help us achieve those goals. Better managing our resources and creating efficiencies in processes will enable staff to focus on value added activities that will benefit our users and our institutions.Under Construction

Because this is a big migration from many systems to one, it will take 18 months to get all Alliance libraries up and running. In the meantime, you will experience a hybrid system, with many of the advantages of the new, next generation system and a few remnants of the old. All the benefits of the new system will become operational when the last group of libraries goes-live. Willamette is one of the first institutions to move to this new environment, so our services may be a bit bumpy during the transition. Information on how to use this new interface (including use of mobile apps) will be coming soon!

We appreciate your patience and good humor as we move to this better, easier to use library system.

Find out more about our new system coming in June 2013, or go to our FAQ page.

 


Better than Printing Tip #12: Condensing Photos and Image DPI

Condense your images. Shrink your photos or reduce Dots per Inch (DPI).

Large images can slow down your printing and waste paper on drafts. Here are some tips to help reduce waste and speed up printing.

    • Use placeholders for your images until your final drafts. Not only will it save a ton of paper but it can help you focus on the flow of the words and transitions.

  • If you have high resolution images (DPI — dots per inch), save them at lower resolution.  One way is to use Photoshop to change your DPI.  Copy your image, then open Photoshop, and click File and new.  A box will open in which you can change your DPI.  We recommend 75 DPI.  Photoshop is available on all campus computer labs.  

 


Better than Printing Tip #10: Condensing PowerPoint Slides

Did you know you can print several slides on one page? PowerPoint, Keynote, even Google Presentations all offer slick ways to print 2x,  4x, or even 6x slides on one pages. It’s perfect for lab references, taking notes, or just plain turning that monstrosity into a 6 page lapdog.

BONUS user-submitted tip! Print More than one page on a single sheet from PDFs:

 

 


Better than Printing Tip #9: Improve Reading on a Computer Screen

Better Than Printing Tip #9: Improve Reading on a Computer Screen.

Reading on a screen can be uncomfortable and exhausting on the eyes. Glare, contrast, and scrolling constantly cause eyestrain quickly. To improve your reading experience on screens, try adjusting nearby light sources, dial down the whites in your monitor, and use tools to hide distracting parts e-articles.

Check out these links for more details:http://lifehacker.com/5890461/how-to-make-reading-on-your-computer-a-better-experience

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2013/03/08/how-to-read-a-computer-screen-the-latest-tools-to-ease-on-screen-reading/

 


Faculty Works Exhibit 2013

Willamette’s Mark O. Hatfield Library is excited to announce the 6th annual Faculty Works Exhibition, which is now open and will run through May 13th, 2013. This annual exhibit features the recent publications and creative works of faculty from every department on campus, including all three graduate schools. Works include published fiction and non-fiction, academic journal articles, artwork, music, design models, documentary films, and more.

Below are just a few things you will find on display.


Coming Soon… World Book Night 2013

World Book Night, April 23, 2013

The second annual World Book Night (WBN) will be April 23rd, 2013.  On this night, tens of thousands of people go out into their communities to spread the joy and love of reading by giving out free WBN paperbacks courtesy of the World Book Night organization.

This is our second year to participate in this event, and we have selected “Glaciers” by Portland author Alexis M. Smith to distribute to 20 students, faculty and staff somewhere on campus.  Last year we handed out ten books at noon by the Mill Stream because it was such a nice day and everyone was outside.  We handed out ten more books in the evening in the Cat Cavern.  If you’re curious where we’ll hand out the books this year, check our Facebook page on April 22 & 23rd for hints of times and places.

Glaciers is in the Hatfield Library’s General Book Collection, and it can also be borrowed from other regional libraries.  If you don’t receive a free copy of Glaciers, we still encourage you to join in the celebration by reading a book of your choice.  The library has lots to choose from if you need inspiration.

Visit the World Book Night organization web site for more details: http://www.us.worldbooknight.org


National Poetry Month 2013

If you didn’t know, April is National Poetry Month.  Created by the Academy of American Poets in 1996, National Poetry Month is held every April throughout the United States to celebrate poetry and its vital place in American culture. Thousands of organizations participate through readings, festivals, book displays, workshops, and other events.

For fun and inspirational ways to get involved, here’s a link to 30 ways of celebrating poetry.  For more information about National Poetry Month check out Poets.org.

Below is a sampling of recent poetry books that can be found in the Hatfield Library (posted during April on the WU Reads web page):

Call Number: PS3569.A4536 A95 2012

 

Cover Art

By herself – Greger, Debora

Call Number: PS3557.R42 B9 2012

 

 

 

Cover Art

The football corporations: poems – Heyen, William

Call Number: PS3558.E85 F66 2012