Water Leak on 2nd Floor

2014-leakMassive water leak on 2nd floor of Hatfield Library this morning. As a heads up, books in the HN-HQ call number range have been removed for water damage assessment.

The roof leak was caused by a blown gauge in the HVAC penthouse. Facilities told us that water was spraying and pooling on the floor on the roof directly above the HN-HQ book section. This excess of water leaked through a seam in the roof onto the HVAC system’s insulation. The insulation collected water until it could not hold any more and then began dripping onto the ceiling tiles. These tiles in turn began dripping onto books.

Affected areas span HN – HQ, specifically the northern bays in each row. We have temporarily blocked access to these areas.

The gauge has been repaired, stopping the source of the leak. Residual water is continuing to move through the roof and ceiling. We have positioned plastic sheeting and receptacles throughout the stacks to collect this water–these will be monitored throughout the day.

Books that were removed from affected shelves have been sorted based upon water damage with dry books being placed out of harms way on the study tables near the leak. Technical services staff is currently addressing damaged materials–there are to date 311 damaged books.

 

UPDATE (11-21-14, 2:18pm):

Displaced dry books have been moved to the ranges which used to house the curriculum collection. Books have been grouped by call number (e.g. all HF books have been shelved together) and will be returned to call number order at a later date.
Facilities staff have set up dehumidifiers near the location of the leak in an attempt to expedite the drying process.
The leak, for the most part, has stopped. Plastic sheeting will remain in place, though, for the time being.

Faculty Colloquia for Spring

Dear Colleagues,

The Faculty Colloquium presentations for this semester have come to an end.  Karen Arabas’ previously scheduled presentation on “Ecological Restoration Work at Zena Forest” has been moved from this coming Friday to February 13th.  Please mark your calendars and join us to hear the intriguing presentations of your colleagues work next Semester.

Time and place:  Friday afternoons at 3 p.m. in the Hatfield Room.

Refreshments will be served

Spring Semester:

Jan. 30:  Josh Laison: “My Friends the Triangles: The Study of Geometric Networks”

Feb. 6:  Marva Duerksen: “Prosody in Emily Dickinson, and in Musical Settings of her Poems”

Feb. 13:  Karen Arabas:  “Ecological Restoration Work at Zena Forest”

Feb. 27:  Kelley Strawn:  “What’s Behind All This ‘Nones’-Sense? – Examining Religious Non-Affiliation in the United States Over Time”

Mar. 6:  Holland Phillips:  “Echoes of the Danish Folkelig Tradition in Carl Nielsen’s Op. 48.”

Mar. 13:  Bill Duvall:  “Unexpected Writing from an Engaged Intellectual: Ahmed Kalouaz and Adolescent Literature.”

Apr. 3:  Bobby Brewer-Wallin:  “My Case Is Altered or Bodies of Elizabeth: Code-switching in Solo Performance”

Apr. 10:  Abigail Susik: “Surrealism, Stenography and the Ouija Board”

Apr. 24:  Panel on “How Your Research influences Your Teaching”  (Followed by a Reception to celebrate another year of research and excellent teaching)

Sincerely,
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators,

Doreen Simonsen

James Miley


“The Collegian” Online Archive

Presentation1Digitization is complete!

Willamette University’s long running newspaper, the Collegian, is now available digitally and fully keyword searchable. With unprecedented access to history at your fingertips, what will you search for?

Beginning in November 2013, over 100 years of Collegian issues needed to be unbound and assessed for completeness. Microfilm copies were used to fill in any gaps. The unbound Collegians were then mailed to iArchives and digitized. Once scanning was complete, each image was reviewed to ensure its readability. Over a century of Collegian data was then uploaded to the Academic Commons for publication. The Collegian is now searchable, and browsable, all the way back to its first issue in 1875.

The Collegian is available at: http://library.willamette.edu./archives/collegian


MOHL Research Awards 2014

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To start the new semester off on a bright note, the Hatfield Library is pleased to announce the winners of our MOHL Research Award.  This award is given for a student paper in any discipline that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources.  The paper must have been written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work.  Up to two awards are given each year and winners receive $500.

The winners for 2014 are:

Giuliana Alfinito for her paper “Understanding the Tito-Stalin Split” (faculty supporter–Bill Smaldone)

Jenny Grauberger for her paper “The Fundamentals and Applications of the Argon Ion Laser.”  (faculty supporter–Chuck Williamson)

Congratulations to Guiliana and Jenny for their outstanding work!


Welcome our new Circulation and Stacks Supervisor

dillon-lgPlease welcome Dillon Peck, our new Circulation and Stack Supervisor at the Hatfield Library.  If he looks familiar, that is because he just graduated from Willamette this spring with a BA in English, and he has been working in the library for several years, most recently as a circulation student manager.

Some fun things to note about Dillon is that he is involved in rowing, his senior thesis was on The Lord of the Rings, and he is a talented juggler (5 things at one time!).

Feel free to contact Dillon regarding anything about borrowing, course reserves, or interlibrary loan.

 


Library Catalog Briefly Unavailable

The library catalog will be offline from 1:00 AM – 4:00 AM Sunday, July 20. This downtime is needed to support a maintenance operation. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.


Library Spaces During 2014 Finals

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We have prepared the library for Finals Week!  Starting April 25th we have extended library hours (click here for details) through Sunday May 11th, including our ever popular free cookies and coffee which are available after 10pm to our fabulous Willamette students.

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Starting next Wednesday, the Hatfield Room will be temporarily designated as a quiet study space during finals week. This compliments the quiet second floor of the library rule. There are two large whiteboards if you need large writing areas to help you think (two more white boards are located downstairs for group study). We also bring in large tables to spread out your work, and some soft chairs for relaxing.
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We have a popular reading collection available downstairs in case you need to break loose from the academic rigor of finals and just enjoy a fun, non-academic book. We will also have a coloring station to let that creativity flow!
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Some other things: We have a recording room which might be handy to those who need to practice a presentation or make a recording for a language class.  We have two printers on the second floor, two on the first floor, and one printer in the Fish Bowl in case one of the printers goes down.  We have soft seating scattered around the library for relaxation, and hard wood-backed chairs if you prefer a more solid chair.  And below is a map of the power outlet to keep your laptops and cell phones humming!

We wish you the best throughout your finals!

Outlets 2013

Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

During finals week, the Hatfield Library is open extra hours to help students studying for finals exams. Don’t forget our new printer in the 24hr Fish Bowl.  A reference librarian is available for research help until 10 pm, and we put out cookies and coffee until they run out after 10 pm if you need a brain food brake!

 

Here are the hours:

  • Fri, Apr. 25: 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
  • Sat, Apr. 26: 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
  • Sun, Apr. 27: 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, Apr. 28: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, Apr. 29: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, Apr. 30: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Thurs, May 1: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Fri, May 2: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sat, May 3: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sun, May 4: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 5: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 6: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 7: 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Thur, May 8: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri, May 9:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat, May 10:  Noon – 4 p.m.
  • Sun, May 11:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Mon, May 12:  Summer Schedule begins: Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  CLOSED Saturday, Sunday and holidays.

Welcoming Ashley Toutain

WU Archives and Special Collections Welcomes Ashley Toutain!

ashleyphoto-cropped

Ashley Toutain joins the Archives’ team full-time as the Processing Archivist and Records Manager. Since September 2012, Ashley has been employed part-time as Willamette’s Assistant Records Manager. In that role, Ashley has contributed significantly by helping to process a backlog of university records that have been accumulating for decades. In addition to processing university records, Ashley curated an exhibit on Willamette’s behalf for the annual Heritage Invitational Exhibition at the Willamette Heritage Center. The exhibit highlighted the many components that comprise a successful archives program. A native of Eastern Oregon, Ashley graduated from Willamette University in 2008 with a B.A. in history. She then attended the University of Kansas where she received her M.A. in Museum Studies.

Ashley brings to the position a collaborative and innovative working-style as well as a keen appreciation for the history of Willamette University and the surrounding region. Please join us in welcoming Ashley!


Graphic Novels and Identity in Africa and the Diaspora

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 4th at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium.

Our speaker will be:

Michelle Bumatay, Visiting Assistant Professor of French

Title: Graphic Novels and Identity in Africa and the Diaspora: A Visual Postcolonial Discoursebumatay_sm

Abstract: Former French President Charles de Gaulle’s famous claim that Belgian character Tintin was his only international rival speaks to the ubiquity of bandes dessinées (comics and graphic novels) in the francophone world. Similarly, in Peau noire, Masques blancs, Frantz Fanon highlights the popularity of bandes dessinées and points to the negative psychological impact of such texts on non-European readers who identify with Western explorer characters rather than with the racialized stereotypical images of non-European characters. One major factor for this is that the emergence and development of French and Belgian bandes dessinées took place during the height of European colonialism and subsequently drew from and participated in a visual culture—such as travel postcards, brochures and keepsakes from colonial expositions, and in particular advertisements for exotic goods such as Banania—that helped construct the European imaginary of Africa. My current work examines how contemporary cartoonists employ a wide range of visual and verbal strategies to subvert existing visual stereotypes of blacks and Africa prevalent in French-language graphic novels (the most ubiquitous example being Tintin in the Congo) and visual culture (including ad campaigns for exotic goods such as Banania). Focusing on cartoonists from West and Central Africa whose work dates from the 1980s to today, my work is chiefly concerned with the representations of postcolonial identity formation. Moreover, I contend that these cartoonists, by challenging mainstream European graphic narrative conventions, invite readers to question meaning-making processes and actively generate new ways of thinking of and visualizing Africa.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators