Closed Fourth of July

This is just a quick reminder that our library, as well as the entire campus, will be closed in observance for the 4th of July.  We well be open the day before (Monday) and the day after (Wednesday) with our normal hours.  Details available at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar


New Art Acquisitions

The Three artworks on view here at the Mark O. Hatfield Library are on loan from the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University.  Located at the corner of State Street and Cottage Street, the museum serves as a cultural and educational resource for the university, the city of Salem, and the entire Northwest region.

The selections of display represent recent acquisitions to the Northwest collection by the museum over the past year.  The museum collection focuses on art from the region — including deep holdings of modern and contemporary art from Oregon and Washington as well as an extensive Native American basket collection.  In addition, the museum has built a broad study collection of art from Ancient Mediterranean, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Oceania.

The artists represented in this exhibition include three Northwest painters Alden Mason (Seattle), Jackie Johnson (Portland), and Bonnie Schulte (Salem).

Below are photos from the exhibit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lecture by Gordon-Reed and Onuf

The History Department invites you to attend a lecture by historians Annette Gordon-Reed, Professor at Harvard Law School and Pulitzer-Prize Winning author of The Hemingses of Monticello, and Peter Onuf, UVA emeritus, founder of the Backstory! Podcast, and author of numerous books on Thomas Jefferson.  The talk will take place on Monday April 24 at 7pm in the Hatfield Room.

Gordon-Reed and Onuf will give a talk based on their recently published and widely-acclaimed book “The Most Blessed of the Patriarchs: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination.”  We hope to see you there!

For questions about this lecture, please contact Seth Cotlar (scotlar@willamette.edu) from the History Department.


MOHL Research Award 2017

Money, Money, Money…

Have you written and researched an amazing paper this year?  If so, we’ve got good news…the library is sponsoring its annual MOHL Research Award and you may be eligible to win a $500 cash prize!  The award will be given for a student paper in any discipline that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources.

To be eligible for this award, the paper must have been written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work and in the current academic year (Fall 2016/Spring 2017).  Deadline: May 9, 2017 at 5:00 p.m.  For complete details and instructions see:  library.willamette.edu/about/award.

*Papers done as a senior project but in the junior year are excluded

 


Introducing Selicity Icefire

Please welcome Selicity Icefire, our new Administrative Assistant at the Mark O. Hatfield Library. Selicity came to us this December after working four years at The Avian Medical Center, Oregon’s only bird-only veterinary hospital (other species not welcome).

She has two majors through Portland State University: anthropology (archaeology emphasis) and earth science (geological engineering emphasis). While this is her first time working in a library, Selicity is no stranger to libraries. During her undergrad, she enjoyed spending time in the library, including the Fort Vancouver archives during her field archaeology studies. Interestingly, as an anthropology major Selicity preferred to do the cataloging and records management portion of archaeological digs.

The next time you see Selicity, make sure to ask about her four birds. Three of them are cockatoos and the fourth is a black Greater Vasa Parrot, all of whom are “fairly well behaved boys.” The oldest cockatoo, named Banzai, “owns” two cats (just ask the bird!). The cats, named Captain Jack and Strax, a nod toward the bald alien in the Doctor Who series, are both hairless sphinx. Also Selicity is an avid jammer, as in berry and fruit jam, and usually makes a batch of jam each weekend.

If you need general directions in the Hatfield Library, to setup meetings, questions about paper work, etc. Selicity is a good person to contact. She also helps in the Archives and Special Collections.

Please help welcome Selicity the next time you see her! The photos below are of Selicity and her animals.

 


Thanksgiving Break Hours

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The Hatfield Library has special hours during Thanksgiving break.

Fri, Nov. 18     7:45 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat – Sun, Nov. 19 – 20     CLOSED
Mon – Tue, Nov. 21-22     8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Wed, Nov. 23     8 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Thur – Sat, Nov. 24 – 26     CLOSED
Sun, Nov. 27   1 p.m. – 2 a.m.

Normal building hours resume Monday, November 28.  The Hatfield Library staff wish the Willamette Community a most wonderful and safe Thanksgiving Break!


Edible Book Festival, April 1st

Do you like food? Books? How about edible books? The library is hosting its fifth annual Edible Book Festival in the Hatfield Room on April 1st, and you are invited to participate!

“War and Peas” by Alice French

“War and Peas” by Alice French

An edible book is a dish inspired by any book, whether your inspiration be the title, the characters in it, plot points, or really anything. The only limits on your creation are that it must be made of mostly food and must be inspired by a book of some kind. We’ll have an example on display in the library soon, or you can check here for examples and inspiration to get your creativity flowing!

If you find yourself with a brilliant idea, bring your edible book to the Hatfield Room between 8:00am and 1:00pm on April 1st. We are excited to see more of your wonderful creations this year!

Drop off entries by 1pm in the Hatfield Room.

8-1pm and 2-4:30pm – Public voting & viewing times

1-2pm – Judging panel votes

4:30pm – Awards ceremony & light refreshments

Prizes will be awarded for the People’s Choice, the Most Literary, the Most Creative, the Punniest, and the Best Student Entry.

Please contact Carol Drost for any questions at cdrost@willamette.edu (503-370-6715).  The following link opens a PDF poster which contains all of the details of the upcoming event: ediblebooks-poster.pdf

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Sarah Sentilles and Rick Barot Readings

Please join us for the second event of the Spring 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette University: a reading by Sarah Sentilles and Rick Barot, on Wednesday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library. The event is free and open to the public, and books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

 

Sarah Sentilles is a nonfiction writer, scholar of religion, critical theorist, and author of three books, including her recent memoir Breaking Up with God: A Love Story. She earned a bachelor’s degree at Yale and master’s and doctoral degrees at Harvard. At the core of her scholarship, writing, and activism is a commitment to investigating the roles language, images, and practices play in oppression, violence, social transformation, and justice movements. She is currently the Mark and Melody Teppola Presidential Distinguished Visiting Professor at Willamette University, teaching courses in religious studies, art, and creative writing. In 2016-17, she will be Chair of the MA in Critical Theory + Creative Research at Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland. She is currently working on a book about art and war titled Draw Your Weapons.

 

Poet Rick Barot is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently Chord (2015), currently a finalist for the PEN Open Book Award for best book of the year by a writer of color. Born in the Philippines and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, he attended Wesleyan University, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and Stanford University, where he was a Stegner Fellow in Poetry and later a Jones Lecturer in Poetry. Barot’s first collection of poetry, The Darker Fall(2002), received the Kathryn A. Morton Prize in Poetry. His second collection, Want(2008), was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Awards and won the 2009 Grub Street Book Prize. His poems and essays have appeared in the New RepublicPoetry, the Kenyon Review, the Virginia Quarterly Review, and others. The recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, Barot has taught at numerous universities including Stanford, California College of the Arts, George Washington University, and Lynchburg College. He currently resides in Tacoma, Washington, and teaches at Pacific Lutheran University.

 

Read an interview with Sarah here: http://religiondispatches.org/ibreaking-up-with-godi-i-didnt-lose-my-faith-i-left-it/

And read Rick’s poem “Tarp” here: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poem/245802

Scott Nadelson


Featuring Craig Milberg

Craig Milberg joined Willamette University on January 4th, 2016, as the new University Librarian at Willamette University. Before joining Willamette, Craig was Assistant Director for Discovery Systems at Davidson College in North Carolina from 2009 to 2015.  A native New Yorker, Craig also worked on Wall Street as a librarian, project manager and IT manager. Before that, Craig was employed as a chemist making radioactive analogs of potential medicines for drug trials, a job that made it necessary for him to have his radioactivity levels checked on a weekly basis.

Craig is married with two young sons and a grown daughter. In his free time he enjoys hiking, nature photography, rose gardening, reef keeping and taking care of his two dogs, one of whom is one of the rarest breeds in the US, a Canaan Dog. In addition to learning the ins and outs of Willamette he is looking forward to exploring the areas many waterfalls with his sons and dogs.

Please welcome Craig the next time you see him!

Craig Milberg University Librarian

Craig Milberg University Librarian


Welcome Amber D’Ambrosio

Amber D'Ambrosio Processing Archivist and Records Manager

Amber D’Ambrosio Processing Archivist and Records Manager

Please welcome Amber D’Ambrosio, our new Processing Archivist and Records Manager at the Mark O. Hatfield Library.  She has had a meandering path to becoming a librarian and archivist. After graduating from Colorado State University with a BA in English, Amber taught English in Japan as part of the Japan Exchange and Teaching Programme from 2006-2008. From there she earned her Master of Arts in English Renaissance Literature at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom. While learning about early modern manuscripts and early printed books in the Brotherton Library at Leeds as part of her degree program, Amber realized that she wanted to become a special collections librarian.

She went on to earn her Master of Science in Information Science at the University at Albany, State University of New York with a focus on rare books and archives. She also took every opportunity to intern with and visit special collections and archives in the United Kingdom and the Northeastern United States. She has seen everything from archived brains (yes, actual brains in jars) to archived meat from a British expedition to find a northwest passage through North America. Prior to arriving at Willamette, Amber was Special Collections Librarian and Archivist at Dixie State University in southwestern Utah for over three years.

Amber has at various times contemplated pursuing a PhD in early modern literature, comparative early modern English and Japanese theatre, or digital humanities. In addition to her interest in rare and unusual books and archives, she loves traveling, hiking, studying Japanese, writing, and theatre.

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