Faculty Colloquium: Ortwin Knorr

Please join us Friday, September 29nd at 3 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Presenter: Ortwin Knorr, Associate Professor of Classics
Title: Using Digital Technology in Teaching a College Colloquium about Film

Integrating digital technology into one’s own teaching can be relatively simple yet pay great dividends, as my experience with my College Colloquium, “Ancient Greece and Rome in the Movies,” may demonstrate. In this presentation, I will discuss my use of simple Powerpoints for pre- and post-tests as well as short lectures on visual concepts; the use of a course blog to draw out more reserved students and to start a discussion outside of class; writing assignments that are tied to existing contributor-fed sites such as the Internet Movie Database (imdb); and the final course project, the students’ creation of their own illustrated website about a movie or movie-related topic of their choice, using free and easy-to-learn software like weebly or wix.

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Shatha Almutawa

Please join us Friday, September 22nd at 3 pm. in the Alumni Lounge for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Presenter: Shatha Almutawa,Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
Title: “Do Muslims Dance Tango?” Religion, Secularism, and the Body in Post-Coup Turkey

Every night in the city of Istanbul, hundreds of men and women gather in dance studios, hotels, nightclubs, and on rooftops to dance the Argentine tango. The communities of tango dancers in Turkey are known to be among the largest—if not the largest—communities in the world outside of Argentina. Turkish tango dancers are renowned for their skill and are known around the world to dance beautifully and with passion. Sensual and intimate, tango is often danced in a close embrace and requires interactions between men and women that are not always compatible with the norms of Turkish society. This talk draws on fieldwork in Turkey and interviews with tango dancers in Istanbul about their histories with tango, their relationships to their religion, and their perceptions of the two cultures to which they belong: Turkish culture and Argentine tango culture. In a country that was founded as a secular republic, Muslims dance tango under the portrait of Atatürk, which has become an important symbol of resistance as Turkey undergoes a government-sponsored religious revival.

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Jade Aguilar

Please join us this Friday, September 8th at 3 pm. in Ford 102 for our first Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided and please note the change in location.

Presenter: Jade Aguilar, Vice President for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion
Title:  “The Promises and Pitfalls of Engaging Male Juvenile Offenders in Gender Violence Prevention and Bystander Education”

Drawing on interviews with and observations of boys enrolled in a bystander violence prevention program at a juvenile detention center, this article provides a sociological case study on how the boys’ biographies and violent lived experiences shaped their engagement with the program. Previous research on bystander prevention programs has typically focused on men enrolled in college who do not have the same kinds of violent histories as the boys in this study do. This article builds upon prior research on prevention programs by demonstrating how at-risk youth participants understand and access the program. We offer suggestions for tailoring bystander prevention programs to more adequately address the specific needs of these populations.

Students are welcome. We look forward to seeing you there.

Ellen Eisenberg and Bill Kelm
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


New Interface Now Live

We have transitioned to a new user interface for the library catalog. Designed with the user experience in mind, the interface from ExLibris should be more intuitive and make finding resources easier.

As we make this transition, let us know if you have any comments or questions about the new catalog. Feel free to send your questions or comments to bkelm@willamette.edu.


New Interface to the Library Catalog

This summer we will be transitioning to a new user interface for the library catalog. We will be transitioning to this new interface in late July 2017.

Designed with the user experience in mind, the interface from ExLibris should be more intuitive and make finding resources easier. As we make this transition, let us know if you have any comments or questions about the new catalog. Feel free to use this form to send us your comments.


Finals Week Extended Study Hours

During finals week, the Hatfield Library is open extra hours to help students studying for finals exams. A reference librarian is available for research help until 5 p.m., and we will begin putting out cookies and coffee the first night before Finals until they run out after 10 p.m. if you need a brain food break! Don’t forget the printer in the 24-hour Fish Bowl.
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  • Thurs, May 4: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Fri, May 5: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sat, May 6: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sun, May 7: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 8: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 9: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 10: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Thur, May 11: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri, May 12:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat, May 13:  Noon – 4 p.m.
  • Sun, May 14:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Mon, May 16:  Summer Schedule begins: Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  CLOSED Saturday, Sunday and holidays.

Faculty Colloquium: Radical or Conventional Relationships

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, March 3rd at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our fifth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Huike Wen, Associate Professor of Chinese and Women and Gender Studies

Title: Radical or Conventional–Portrayal in Chinese Media of the Relationship between an Older Woman and a Younger Man

Huike Wen

The opinion that a husband should be a few years older than his wife is commonly accepted, although it is not rigid in reality and there are stories that tell otherwise in different cultures. The belief is supported by biological, sociological, economics, and psychological studies and by individuals’ reflections on experiences.

Contrary to the belief, in China, recently the romantic relationship between an older woman and a younger man has been a popular topic in the Chinese media landscape. Despite the increase in the number of such marriages and media attention on the older woman–younger man relationship, very little serious and in-depth academic work has focused on this relationship. As a myth, this type of relationship is basically represented as something new, modern, and radical, engaged in by many celebrities as well as creating media celebrities out of some ordinary people. The media portrayals seem to add another alternative in the discourse of heterosexual relationships, especially conventional heterosexual marriage. Focusing on recent popular Chinese television dramas, I examine how the media portrayals signal and celebrate a new form of relationship and marriage, yet still strongly reinforce the male-dominant status in romantic relationships.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, February 24th at 3 pm. in the EATON 425 for our fourth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. (Please note the change in location) Treats will be provided.

Inga Johnson, Professor of Mathematics

Title: An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory

As part of my last sabbatical, my collaborator, Allison Henrich, and I completed our book An Interactive Introduction to Knot Theory (published by Dover, January 2017). Our text is unique not because of the mathematics that it contains, but rather due to the pedagogy it employs. We have designed the book to be used in an inquiry-based setting where students independently figure out, derive, and create many of the major results of knot theory while using our book as a guide. The book contains definitions, exercises, and statements of theorems, but the proofs and arguments that underlie the theory are left for readers to develop as they progress through the text. This active-learning pedagogy places the students ideas and arguments as the centerpiece of the course. As a result, class meetings include little to no lecture but are instead filled with student presentations followed by a process of questions and vetting by their peers.

In my talk I will discuss the following questions: what is the difference between math research and writing a mathematical book? How does an inquiry-based course compare to a “traditional” mathematics course? What goes into planning and managing an inquiry-based course, and how does one create inquiry-based activities? What is knot theory, and why is it a good topic for inquiry-based pedagogy? I will also discuss current research on student outcomes when inquiry-based methods are used and how those outcomes compare to non-inquiry-based courses.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Prosody and Time in Musical Settings of Emily Dickinson

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, February 10th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Marva Duerksen, Associate Professor of Music, Women’s & Gender Studies

Title: Prosody and Time in Musical Settings of Emily Dickinson

Musical settings of Emily Dickinson’s poems—some 3,000 by one collector’s reckoning—comprise a core component of the American art-song repertory and a sustained and wide-ranging constituent of her reception. That said, a mutually insightful conversation between musical and literary scholarly communities lies largely untapped, most especially in that facet of Dickinson’s poems that she herself highlights conspicuously and that constitutes a shared concern in both poetry and music: prosody, and its companion, time.

Several questions arise: how can literary prosodic method inform analysis of musical settings of her works? And, what insights can composers offer the literary community as they interpret the poet’s rhythmic and metric designs? More specifically, how do composers execute in music signal elements of Dickinson’s prosody—the familiar “dash,” a startling approach to rhyme, disruptions of conventional grammar, and idiosyncratic lineation? Then, how do composers’ renderings of such features through specially tempered rhythmic pacing, multi-layered rhythmic designs, and heterogeneous musical vocabularies in turn impact our comprehension of the disruptions endemic to her work? Finally, how can these analyses inform the categories of time—diachronic and synchronic—vital to Dickinson’s poetic project? Exploring these questions through literary models and musical settings by composers Ernst Bacon, Vincent Persichetti, and Niccoló Castiglioni provides a starting point for the dialogue proposed here.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

The Hatfield Library is now providing extended hours for final exams. Also, don’t forget about the free cookies and coffee provided by the library…usually the cookies are made available after 10 p.m. starting on Sunday, Dec. 11th until they run out.

These are the hours for the end of the term:

Monday, Dec. 5 – Thursday, Dec. 8 — 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Friday, Dec. 9 — 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 10 — 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 11 — 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 12 – Friday, Dec. 16 — 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 17 — 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 18 — CLOSED

Winter break begins on Monday, Dec. 19. During the break, the library will be open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on the weekends. Also, the library (and the rest of campus) will be closed from Dec. 23 through Jan. 2. Regular hours resume on Jan. 17.