Library News

Library Catalog Briefly Unavailable

The library catalog will be offline from 1:00 AM – 4:00 AM Sunday, July 20. This downtime is needed to support a maintenance operation. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Library Spaces During 2014 Finals

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We have prepared the library for Finals Week!  Starting April 25th we have extended library hours (click here for details) through Sunday May 11th, including our ever popular free cookies and coffee which are available after 10pm to our fabulous Willamette students.

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Starting next Wednesday, the Hatfield Room will be temporarily designated as a quiet study space during finals week. This compliments the quiet second floor of the library rule. There are two large whiteboards if you need large writing areas to help you think (two more white boards are located downstairs for group study). We also bring in large tables to spread out your work, and some soft chairs for relaxing.
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We have a popular reading collection available downstairs in case you need to break loose from the academic rigor of finals and just enjoy a fun, non-academic book. We will also have a coloring station to let that creativity flow!
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Some other things: We have a recording room which might be handy to those who need to practice a presentation or make a recording for a language class.  We have two printers on the second floor, two on the first floor, and one printer in the Fish Bowl in case one of the printers goes down.  We have soft seating scattered around the library for relaxation, and hard wood-backed chairs if you prefer a more solid chair.  And below is a map of the power outlet to keep your laptops and cell phones humming!

We wish you the best throughout your finals!

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Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

During finals week, the Hatfield Library is open extra hours to help students studying for finals exams. Don’t forget our new printer in the 24hr Fish Bowl.  A reference librarian is available for research help until 10 pm, and we put out cookies and coffee until they run out after 10 pm if you need a brain food brake!

 

Here are the hours:

  • Fri, Apr. 25: 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
  • Sat, Apr. 26: 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
  • Sun, Apr. 27: 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, Apr. 28: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, Apr. 29: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, Apr. 30: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Thurs, May 1: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Fri, May 2: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sat, May 3: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sun, May 4: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 5: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 6: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 7: 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Thur, May 8: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri, May 9:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat, May 10:  Noon – 4 p.m.
  • Sun, May 11:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Mon, May 12:  Summer Schedule begins: Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  CLOSED Saturday, Sunday and holidays.

Oregon Professors of the Year

As a fitting conclusion to the academic year, please join us for the final Faculty Colloquium, tomorrow, Friday, April 25, from 3-4 p.m. (please note the later starting time) in Ford Hall, Room 122.

The final faculty colloquium of this academic year features our current and former Oregon Professors of the Year, talking about–what else?–teaching. Professors Sammy Basu (Politics), Richard Ellis (Politics), Jerry Gray (Economics), Karen Holman (Chemistry), Frances Chapple (Emerita, Chemistry), and Roger Hull (Emeritus, Art History) will reflect on their experiences in the classroom at Willamette: what worked, what they learned, what they’re doing now, and what they might do in the future. . . .  (For all of Willamette’s Oregon Professors of the Years, visit http://www.willamette.edu/about/recognition/professor_of_the_year/)

This celebration of great teaching in the College of Liberal Arts will be followed by a reception in Ford Hall, Room 102 hosted by AVAA and University Librarian Deborah Dancik and the Office for Faculty Research and Resources.

Please join us for what we anticipate will be an engaging, even enlightening, few hours of reflection, conversation, and fun in Willamette’s newest academic building dedicated to teaching and learning.

Friday, April 25, Ford Hall, Room 122
Faculty Colloquium
3-4 p.m. Oregon Professors of the Year
4-6 p.m. Reception

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Patricia Alley, Associate Director
Office for Faculty Research and Resources.

 

Sammy Basu Karen Holman Jerry Grey Richard Ellis Frances ChappleRoger Hull

Poetry Display, 2nd Floor of Library

In honor of National Poetry Month, there is currently an exhibit on the second floor of the library that displays poetry in various forms.  Part of the poetry selection comes from the personal collections of library staff, including books and poetry on cards.  Some of the items have been found in books and materials donated to the Hatfield Library. Below are images of the display.

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Laughing into the Abyss: Comedy’s Existential Howl

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 11th at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium.

Our speaker will be:

Scott Nadelson, Assistant Professor of English; Hallie Ford Chair in Writing

Title: Laughing into the Abyss: Comedy’s Existential Howlnadelson_sm

Abstract: This talk on the craft and process of narrative writing explores the relationship between comedy and lamentation. I examine work by the Coen brothers, Nikolai Gogol, and Penelope Fitzgerald—with diversions to Lenny Bruce, Sarah Silverman, Richard Pryor, and The Office—to understand how writers use comedy to wrestle with the complexities of mortality, grief, faith, and compassion. I also discuss how comedy has played a role in my own recent work.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

Faculty Works Display 2014

The Hatfield Library will have a large selection of faculty works on display on the first floor of the library from April 1st through May 11th.  The collection ranges from music score arrangements to photos of theatre productions and selections of scholarly research articles and books written by Willamette faculty.  (And feel free to browse through the articles written by our faculty).

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Featured Database: GeoRef

georefGeoRef is a geoscience database that provides access to over 2,000,000 records for the world’s geological sciences literature, including journal articles, books, maps, conference papers, and theses.

Produced by the American Geosciences Institute, this comprehensive geosciences database contains 3.4 million bibliographic records to the geosciences literature of the world. Over 3,500 journals are reviewed for indexing in the GeoRef database as well as books, maps, government reports, conference papers, theses and dissertations.  Over 100,000 references are added to GeoRef annually.

It is truly an indispensable research tool, and a first-stop when researching anything related to the earth sciences.  The geology of North America is covered from 1669 to the present, and global coverage dates back to 1933. In fact, the Library Journal had this to say about this resource: “[The] Advanced Search, with its elegantly laid-out tool set for crafting very precise search strategies, gives the user great control over the whole search process.”

Welcoming Ashley Toutain

WU Archives and Special Collections Welcomes Ashley Toutain!

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Ashley Toutain joins the Archives’ team full-time as the Processing Archivist and Records Manager. Since September 2012, Ashley has been employed part-time as Willamette’s Assistant Records Manager. In that role, Ashley has contributed significantly by helping to process a backlog of university records that have been accumulating for decades. In addition to processing university records, Ashley curated an exhibit on Willamette’s behalf for the annual Heritage Invitational Exhibition at the Willamette Heritage Center. The exhibit highlighted the many components that comprise a successful archives program. A native of Eastern Oregon, Ashley graduated from Willamette University in 2008 with a B.A. in history. She then attended the University of Kansas where she received her M.A. in Museum Studies.

Ashley brings to the position a collaborative and innovative working-style as well as a keen appreciation for the history of Willamette University and the surrounding region. Please join us in welcoming Ashley!

Graphic Novels and Identity in Africa and the Diaspora

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 4th at 2:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for this week’s Faculty Colloquium.

Our speaker will be:

Michelle Bumatay, Visiting Assistant Professor of French

Title: Graphic Novels and Identity in Africa and the Diaspora: A Visual Postcolonial Discoursebumatay_sm

Abstract: Former French President Charles de Gaulle’s famous claim that Belgian character Tintin was his only international rival speaks to the ubiquity of bandes dessinées (comics and graphic novels) in the francophone world. Similarly, in Peau noire, Masques blancs, Frantz Fanon highlights the popularity of bandes dessinées and points to the negative psychological impact of such texts on non-European readers who identify with Western explorer characters rather than with the racialized stereotypical images of non-European characters. One major factor for this is that the emergence and development of French and Belgian bandes dessinées took place during the height of European colonialism and subsequently drew from and participated in a visual culture—such as travel postcards, brochures and keepsakes from colonial expositions, and in particular advertisements for exotic goods such as Banania—that helped construct the European imaginary of Africa. My current work examines how contemporary cartoonists employ a wide range of visual and verbal strategies to subvert existing visual stereotypes of blacks and Africa prevalent in French-language graphic novels (the most ubiquitous example being Tintin in the Congo) and visual culture (including ad campaigns for exotic goods such as Banania). Focusing on cartoonists from West and Central Africa whose work dates from the 1980s to today, my work is chiefly concerned with the representations of postcolonial identity formation. Moreover, I contend that these cartoonists, by challenging mainstream European graphic narrative conventions, invite readers to question meaning-making processes and actively generate new ways of thinking of and visualizing Africa.

Doreen Simonsen and Stephanie DeGooyer
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators