Archives News

Welcome to Willamette!

For well over 160 years Willamette University has been welcoming new students to campus!

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Today begins Opening Days, in which over 500 freshman, transfer, and international students, and their families arrive on campus. Welcome to Willamette, and to Opening Days, new students and families!

More early images of Willamette campus are available in the Willamette Archives and via our Campus Photographs collection.

Wilbur letters digitized

Wilbur

Thanks to the work of summer intern, Bronte Dodd, who scanned and uploaded the correspondence, and attached metadata including transcriptions, James Harvey Wilbur’s papers are now available online.

James Harvey Wilbur (1811-1887) came to the Oregon Territory in 1846 as part of the Oregon Methodist Mission. In 1848, he became principal of the Oregon Institute, where he and his wife, Lucretia Anne, taught. After the Oregon Institute became Willamette University in 1853, Wilbur served as a member of the board of trustees and was as temporary president on two occasions. Wilbur served as an agent at the Yakama Indian Agency near Walla Walla in the Washington Territory for nearly 20 years. Wilbur collected businesses records and correspondence throughout his life, as well as writing a journal about his travels around Cape Horn from New York to Oregon.

Wilbur1Well over 400 pages of Wilbur’s correspondence and ledgers can now be viewed online, along with their transcriptions. The bulk of the material is from the 1880s and pertains to Wilbur’s career as Indian Agent for the Yakama Reservation at Fort Simcoe in the Washington Territory.

Wilbur’s letters and business documents can be viewed online here.

View the James Harvey Wilbur papers finding aid to see all of the materials available in the Archives.

Ban on Dancing

DancingPoll12_7_1933Given its Methodist heritage, dancing and card playing were forbidden on the Willamette campus until the 1930s. While the dancing ban was a fact of  Willamette life in its early years, through the 1910s and 1920s students were beginning to find issue with the ban. Student body numbers were increasing, and many students had grown up dancing at local social events. By 1933, the Associated Students of Willamette University conducted a poll inquiring about students’ desire to partake in social dancing functions. With a vote of 369 to 67, the vast majority of students just wanted to dance! The response from the Board of Trustees was to restate that “Sunday afternoon teas, which have been becoming increasingly popular on campus, meet administration requirements only as long as no dancing or card-playing is permitted.”

Womendancingwithdummies

Photographs and newspapers help us imagine students’ reactions to their social regulation. While we do not know the true story behind these women dancing, perhaps their dance with dummies is in protest to the ban on social dancing.

You can view this photo, and many like it, in the Paulus Glass Plate Negatives collection. You can find reactions to the ban on dancing in the Collegian, which is currently available in the Archives and soon to be available from anywhere on the Archives website.

WU Archives and Special Collections Welcomes Ashley Toutain!

 

Ashley photoAshley Toutain joins the Archives’ team full-time as the Processing Archivist and Records Manager. Since September 2012, Ashley has been employed part-time as Willamette’s Assistant Records Manager.  In that role, Ashley has contributed significantly by helping to process a backlog of university records that have been accumulating for decades.  In addition to processing university records, Ashley curated an exhibit on Willamette’s behalf for the annual Heritage Invitational Exhibition at the Willamette Heritage Center. The exhibit highlighted the many components that comprise a successful archives program. A native of Eastern Oregon, Ashley graduated from Willamette University in 2008 with a B.A. in history. She then attended the University of Kansas where she received her M.A. in Museum Studies.

Ashley brings to the position a collaborative and innovative working-style as well as a keen appreciation for the history of Willamette University and the surrounding region. Please join us in welcoming Ashley!

Kathleen Gemberling Adkison Papers

KGA_print_079Kathleen Gemberling Adkison (1917-2010) was an abstract painter whose work was, and is, featured in Museums and Galleries throughout the Northwest. She studied art with Leon Derbyshire at the Cornish Institute in Seattle, Washington between 1938 and 1942. She then began studying with Mark Tobey, an influential Northwest painter and one of the founders of the Northwest School. Adkison’s first solo exhibition was in 1957 at the Henriette E. Woessner Alumni Gallery, Seattle. Throughout her career she had numerous solo exhibitions, the majority of which were at Gordon Woodside/John Braseth Gallery in Seattle. Adkison participated in group exhibitions throughout Washington as well as throughout the nation.

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The Kathleen Gemberling Adkison papers include photographs, newspaper articles, and correspondence about Adkison’s work. Correspondence includes letters of congratulations and appreciation, logistics of setting up gallery shows, individuals purchasing her artwork, as well as critiques of her work. Also included in the collection are awards she received for her painting, and programs for the gallery shows and museum exhibits in which her paintings were featured.

View the slide collection online  | Find out more about the collection

Oregon Archives Crawl


Everyone is invited to the 2nd Annual Oregon Archives Crawl on Saturday, October 15th in Portland, Oregon. Start at any of the four host locations (Portland Archives and Records Center, the Portland State University Millar Library, Multnomah County Central Library or the Oregon Historical Society) and get ready to dive head first into history. Information about times, events and activities are found at the Oregon Archives Crawl blog. We look forward to meeting you there!