Exhibit: Students Interned

In 1942, ten Willamette students were forced into internment camps because of their Japanese ancestry. Students Interned highlights the stories of those ten students who were each born in the United States and were in the midst of their studies when their internment notices came. Reiko Azumano, Kenji Kurita, Kate Kyono, Tom Oye ‘41, Henry (Hank) Tanaka, Hideto (Hide) Tomita, Maye Oye Uemura, Edward Uyesugi, Taul Watanabe ‘41, and Yoshi Yoshizawa were active members on the Willamette campus, participating in organizations such as Glee, YMCA, and writing for the student newspaper, The Collegian. Most of these men and women continued their education after internment, earning degrees in law, medicine, politics, and sociology. This exhibit features photographs, news articles, books, and yearbooks showcasing each of the students.

Students Interned

Students Interned is on display in the Mark O. Hatfield Library on the Willamette University campus. Also on exhibit through March is Roger Shimomura: An American Knockoff at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Roger Shimomura is an accomplished artist born in Seattle who spent part of his childhood in an internment camp during  WWII. Greetings from Tule Lake



University Archives Exhibit

Zena Forest and Farm

Willamette University Archives is participating in the Willamette Heritage Center’s annual invitational exhibition, Made in the Valley.

Zena forest courtesy of Frank MillerThe Archives exhibit, Zena: Production and Education in the Eola Hills highlights the history of Zena forest and farm, located just west of Salem, from its first settlers to its conservation and educational use today.

Made in the Valley features exhibits from area heritage organizations exploring manufacture and production in the Willamette Valley. The exhibit opens Friday, January 16th and runs through Saturday, March 14th, 2015.Zena exhibit

For information on location and hours visit: http://www.willametteheritage.org/


History at Your Fingertips!

What will you search for?

Have you ever wondered what was written in the first Collegian? What were students’ concerns in the 1910s, 1940s, or 1980s? What did Blitz look like before he was Blitz? Soon, those answers will be just clicks away!

History at Your Fingertips



Now, you can find some of those answers in the new exhibit on the second floor of the Hatfield Library. History at Your Fingertips is in place to honor the upcoming reveal of the digitized Collegians and Wallulahs. This fall, both the Collegian  newspaper and the Wallulah  yearbook will be available via the Archives’ website, will be keyword searchable, and will provide a level of access to Willamette University history never before possible.


The History at your Fingertips exhibit features themes from student life, student protests, athletics, and Lausanne Hall. Get a sense of what articles your search will pull up, and what treasures you might find: from articles on the haunting of Lausanne Hall; to advertisements for typewriters; to stories of students riding their horses to class in the 1800s. A wealth of Willamette history will be just clicks away. Collegian athletics


Come see the exhibit anytime the Hatfield Library is open.

Ban on Dancing

DancingPoll12_7_1933Given its Methodist heritage, dancing and card playing were forbidden on the Willamette campus until the 1930s. While the dancing ban was a fact of  Willamette life in its early years, through the 1910s and 1920s students were beginning to find issue with the ban. Student body numbers were increasing, and many students had grown up dancing at local social events. By 1933, the Associated Students of Willamette University conducted a poll inquiring about students’ desire to partake in social dancing functions. With a vote of 369 to 67, the vast majority of students just wanted to dance! The response from the Board of Trustees was to restate that “Sunday afternoon teas, which have been becoming increasingly popular on campus, meet administration requirements only as long as no dancing or card-playing is permitted.”


Photographs and newspapers help us imagine students’ reactions to their social regulation. While we do not know the true story behind these women dancing, perhaps their dance with dummies is in protest to the ban on social dancing.

You can view this photo, and many like it, in the Paulus Glass Plate Negatives collection. You can find reactions to the ban on dancing in the Collegian, which is currently available in the Archives and soon to be available from anywhere on the Archives website.

Digitizing the Collegian and Wallulah

Just in time for students’ return in the fall, Willamette history will be at our fingertips! The digitization of the Collegian newspaper, dating from 1875, and the Wallulah yearbook, dating from 1903, will be complete late this summer. Digitization of the Collegian was outsourced to iArchives and scanning began in November 2013. Archives Administrative Assistant, Christopher McFetridge, unbound each page, checked for missing material, and with assistance from Archives Intern, Nina Kulander, monitored the quality of scans produced by iArchives. In monitoring these scans, wonderful images, such as this ‘flat screen’ of 1974, have been discovered.

Flat Screen 1974

Both the Collegian and the Wallulah will be available this fall via the Archives’ website, will be keyword searchable, and will provide a level of access to Willamette and university history never before possible.

Anatomy of an exhibit

The news here at the WU Archives is that a new exhibit is being prepared for viewing beginning Monday, 12 August. We thought it would be interesting to show you some behind-the-scenes views of what it looks like to put an exhibit together. Our Exhibit Creator is Shanel Parette who is the Circulation and Stacks Supervisor at the Mark O. Hatfield Library.

Notice the blue tape marking where other items will be placed.

Notice the blue tape marking where other items will be placed.

Shanel, caught in the midst of putting up the exhibit.

Shanel, caught in the midst of putting up the exhibit.