History at Your Fingertips!

What will you search for?

Have you ever wondered what was written in the first Collegian? What were students’ concerns in the 1910s, 1940s, or 1980s? What did Blitz look like before he was Blitz? Soon, those answers will be just clicks away!

History at Your Fingertips

 

 

Now, you can find some of those answers in the new exhibit on the second floor of the Hatfield Library. History at Your Fingertips is in place to honor the upcoming reveal of the digitized Collegians and Wallulahs. This fall, both the Collegian  newspaper and the Wallulah  yearbook will be available via the Archives’ website, will be keyword searchable, and will provide a level of access to Willamette University history never before possible.

 

The History at your Fingertips exhibit features themes from student life, student protests, athletics, and Lausanne Hall. Get a sense of what articles your search will pull up, and what treasures you might find: from articles on the haunting of Lausanne Hall; to advertisements for typewriters; to stories of students riding their horses to class in the 1800s. A wealth of Willamette history will be just clicks away. Collegian athletics

 

Come see the exhibit anytime the Hatfield Library is open.


Welcome to Willamette!

For well over 160 years Willamette University has been welcoming new students to campus!

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Today begins Opening Days, in which over 500 freshman, transfer, and international students, and their families arrive on campus. Welcome to Willamette, and to Opening Days, new students and families!

More early images of Willamette campus are available in the Willamette Archives and via our Campus Photographs collection.


Wilbur letters digitized

Wilbur

Thanks to the work of summer intern, Bronte Dodd, who scanned and uploaded the correspondence, and attached metadata including transcriptions, James Harvey Wilbur’s papers are now available online.

James Harvey Wilbur (1811-1887) came to the Oregon Territory in 1846 as part of the Oregon Methodist Mission. In 1848, he became principal of the Oregon Institute, where he and his wife, Lucretia Anne, taught. After the Oregon Institute became Willamette University in 1853, Wilbur served as a member of the board of trustees and was as temporary president on two occasions. Wilbur served as an agent at the Yakama Indian Agency near Walla Walla in the Washington Territory for nearly 20 years. Wilbur collected businesses records and correspondence throughout his life, as well as writing a journal about his travels around Cape Horn from New York to Oregon.

Wilbur1Well over 400 pages of Wilbur’s correspondence and ledgers can now be viewed online, along with their transcriptions. The bulk of the material is from the 1880s and pertains to Wilbur’s career as Indian Agent for the Yakama Reservation at Fort Simcoe in the Washington Territory.

Wilbur’s letters and business documents can be viewed online here.

View the James Harvey Wilbur papers finding aid to see all of the materials available in the Archives.