Eclipse-2017

“The Great American Eclipse,” the first solar eclipse to touch the continental United States since 1979, occurred right here in Salem on the morning of August 21st (10:18 a.m.).  We have compiled events that happened on campus, as well as observation tips, safety, and other fun activities.

Additional info at: http://libguides.willamette.edu/solar-eclipse


First Year of College

The beginning of the new academic year is rapidly approaching. That means we are anticipating the arrival of a whole new litter of Bearcats. It is an exciting time for all but particularly for our first year students. Many will be living away from their families for the first time, meeting lots of new people, establishing new routines, transitioning from high school student to college student, etc. It is enough to make your head whirl just thinking about all the changes! The library is always here to help with this adjustment and in anticipation of the fall, why not check out a book dealing with first year students or college in general?

Have a look at our WU Reads Reading Guide.


New Interface Now Live

We have transitioned to a new user interface for the library catalog. Designed with the user experience in mind, the interface from ExLibris should be more intuitive and make finding resources easier.

As we make this transition, let us know if you have any comments or questions about the new catalog. Feel free to send your questions or comments to bkelm@willamette.edu.


Oregon Coast and Highway History

The Oregon Coast is filled with unexpected history. Prior to World War I, most of the Oregon coast was inaccessible. As a response to World War I and perceived need for emergency preparedness, the concept of the Roosevelt Coast Military Highway was created and named in honor of President Theodore Roosevelt.

In 1919, Oregon voters approved the sale of $2.5 million in bonds for the project, but matching federal funds failed to materialize. But Oregonians still wanted access to the coasts, so the Oregon’s Highway Department began work on 400 miles worth of road, bridges, and tunnels in 1921 and continued through the 1920s & 30s. The road became U.S. 101 in 1926 and then renamed in 1931 as the Oregon Coast Highway.

This is also the 50th anniversary of Oregon’s Beach Bill which was signed into law on July 6, 1967 to safeguard beaches from development.  Our beloved coast could look much different had the bill failed and a few private developers won. Thankfully as Oregonians began to hear what they stood to lose, the trickle of public support turned into a tidal wave.  After months of  battle, the bill was signed into law.  And the rest is history.  Your experience of our wonderful Oregon Coast line and access to the miles of beach that people around the world come to visit is a direct result from this important legislative bill.  Know that our beautiful beach is for the public to treasure and protect.  Forever!

Below are just a few of the dozens of images from the Oregon Encyclopedia that describe the history of Highway 101, the Oregon Coast Highway (https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/highway_101_oregon_coast_highway_/#.WWOvVojyuUk).  The following link also goes to a page of activities and events connected to the Oregon’s Beach Bill (http://visittheoregoncoast.com/oregon-beach-bill-50th-anniversary-celebration).

   
 
   
   

To Market, To Market…

Over the last several years, the number of farmers’ markets has been growing steadily across the country. It seems like every city and town has some sort of market and Salem is no exception! Outdoor farmers’ markets are open three days a week at three different locations during the summer/fall and a small indoor Saturday market is open year round.  The markets offer a bounty of fresh, healthy produce, a variety of fabulous food carts, interesting crafts,Produce and a great opportunity to support the local economy.  To find out more about farmers’ markets in Oregon, check out the Oregon Farmers Market Association.

As a tribute to farmers’ markets everywhere, we’re highlighting a selection of books related to the markets on our WU Reads Reading Guide.  Take a look!


Closed Fourth of July

This is just a quick reminder that our library, as well as the entire campus, will be closed in observance for the 4th of July.  We well be open the day before (Monday) and the day after (Wednesday) with our normal hours.  Details available at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar


New Art Acquisitions

The three artworks shown above are on loan from the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University.  Located at the corner of State Street and Cottage Street, the museum serves as a cultural and educational resource for the university, the city of Salem, and the entire Northwest region.

The selections on display represent recent acquisitions to the museum’s Northwest collection.  The museum collection focuses on art from the region — including deep holdings of modern and contemporary art from Oregon and Washington as well as an extensive Native American basket collection.  In addition, the museum has built a broad study collection of art from Ancient Mediterranean, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Oceania.

The artists represented in the Hatfield Library exhibition include three Northwest painters Alden Mason (Seattle), Jackie Johnson (Portland), and Bonnie Schulte (Salem).

Below are photos from the exhibit:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


New Interface to the Library Catalog

This summer we will be transitioning to a new user interface for the library catalog. We will be transitioning to this new interface in late July 2017.

Designed with the user experience in mind, the interface from ExLibris should be more intuitive and make finding resources easier. As we make this transition, let us know if you have any comments or questions about the new catalog. Feel free to use this form to send us your comments.


LGBT Pride Month

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month is celebrated each year in June to honor the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City. These spontaneous demonstrations by the LGBT community occurred in protest over police raids at the Stonewall Inn, a well-known gay club in Manhattan. The Stonewall riots are considered by many to be the tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States. “The purpose of the commemorative month is to recognize the impact that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals have had on history locally, nationally, and internationally.” Library of Congress, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month

As a tribute to LGBT Pride Month, we’re highlighting a selection of recent books related to the LGBT community on our WU Reads Reading Guide.  Take a look!


Squirrel Kidnapped

We currently have a mini-archives exhibit all about squirrels on display on the first floor of the library. There are tidbits of info about our infamous squirrels, including a petition that went to Governor McCall in the 1970s to declare the squirrels an endangered species near Willamette University and the Oregon State Capitol Building. Two separate Willamette Collegian articles are highlighted that accused Longview, Washington of stealing squirrels.  These two articles started the controversy surrounding the squirrel-napping.

Did you know that Willamette University’s squirrel population is made up of grey squirrels?  The grey squirrels were brought as a gift for the school in the 1880s.  Unfortunately, grey squirrels are an invasive species to the Pacific Northwest and displace red squirrels.  

Thank you Kate Kerns, intern in our Archives and Special Collections for pulling this exhibit together with materials from our Archives and Special Collections.