2015 EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL

The Mark O. Hatfield Library invites you to participate in the fourth annual EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!

Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Hatfield Room.edible-books-2015

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

Some of last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle Public Library and Duke University, or check out flickr. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Free to enter– no registration required. Drop off your entry in the Hatfield Room on March 11 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book until 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

All entries will be on display from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Even if you don’t enter, you can cast a vote for your favorite edible book. At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges– Mike Chasar (English), Karen Wood (University Chaplain), and Kaitlen McPherson (CLA student) — will announce the prizes for:

Best Student Entry

Most Literary

Most Creative

Punniest

People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners. To view all photos of last year’s entries, go to:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2014/03/20/edible-book-festival-results-2014/

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu

Last year’s winners:

Award Winners
war-and-peas2 “War and Peas”

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
People’s Choice
pitcher-dory-gray “Pitcher of Dory in Gray

Created by Emily Wetherford
Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s
Portrait of Dorian Gray”
Best Student Entry
dune He Who Controls the
Spice Controls the Universe

Created by Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by Frank Herbert’s
“Dune”
Most Creative
war-and-peas War and Peas

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Most Literary
wholey-bible2 The Hole-y Bible

Created by Anna Corner
Inspired by “The Holy Bible”
Punniest

Willamette University May Weekend Collection

may-pole-danceWillamette University’s first May Day celebration took place in 1909. In the early years, campus literary societies elected and coronated a King and Queen of festivities, participated in intramural athletic competitions, and welcomed alumni back to campus. By the early 1930s the May Court no longer elected a King and consisted of a May Queen and her Attendants. As literary societies were largely defunct by this time, sororities played a much larger role in the voting for Queen.may-day-dinner

In 1970 several of the regular events attached to May Day, or Spring Weekend as it was later called, were dropped due to lack of interest. This included the election of the Spring Weekend court. Willamette then chose to emphasize the academic instead of the social facet of campus life. The event changed shape to become primarily a preview-day for prospective students.

The Willamette University May Weekend collection contains photographs, newspaper clippings, and event programs related to the university’s celebration of May Day. Some of the scenes of May Day depicted include the winding of the May pole, coronation of the May King and Queen, and group dances. Newspaper articles detail the merit of the 1956 May Queen and court. Programs outline the events of the weekend, including activities such as tug-of-war over the mill stream, and theatrical performances.

Originally written by Christopher McFetridge.  View more photos and documents at:

http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4902

 

may-day-court

 


Deadline for $500 MOHL Awards

The MOHL Research Award, sponsored by the Hatfield Library, is awarded for an excellent paper in any subject that demonstrates outstanding research using library and information resources. Up to two $500 cash prizes may be awarded. Any student paper written in the sophomore or junior year as part of regular class work is eligible to be considered for this award. The paper should have been written in the current academic year, that is, fall 2014/spring 2015.

Note: papers done as a senior project but in the junior year are excluded.

Deadline: all paperwork must be in by the last day of finals, May 13, 2015 at 5:00 p.m.

Details at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/award/


Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

During finals week, the Hatfield Library is open extra hours to help students studying for finals exams. Don’t forget our new printer in the 24-hour Fish Bowl.  A reference librarian is available for research help until 5 p.m., and we will begin putting out cookies and coffee the first night before Finals until they run out after 10 p.m. if you need a brain food break!

Here are the hours:

  • Fri, May 1: 7:45 a.m. – 1 a.m.
  • Sat, May 2: 9 a.m. – 1 a.m.
  • Sun, May 3: 9 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 4: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 5: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 6: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Thurs, May 7: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Fri, May 8: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sat, May 9: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sun, May 10: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 11: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 12: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 13: 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Thur, May 14: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri, May 15:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat, May 16:  Noon – 4 p.m.
  • Sun, May 17:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Mon, May 18:  Summer Schedule begins: Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  CLOSED Saturday, Sunday and holidays.

Faculty Colloquium: “Composing a World”

Please join us this Friday, Friday, April 17th at 3:00 pm in Cone Chapel for the eighth and final Faculty Colloquium of this semester. It will be a musical treat and a lovely way to wrap up the semester. (Please note the change of location)

duerksen_sm
Marva Duerksen, Associate Professor of Music, Women’s & Gender Studies

welch_sm
Christine Welch Elder, Continuing Adjunct Professor of Music

Title: “Composing a World”: Ricky Ian Gordon sets Langston Hughes

Abstract:

The provocative opening to Langston Hughes’s poem, “Daybreak in Alabama,” claims a special power for music: “When I get to be a composer, I’m gonna write me some music about daybreak in Alabama.” In the poem, Hughes goes on to imagine a world in which hands of all colors touch each other “with kind fingers,” “naturally as dew”—a utopian vision of harmonious race relations the poet can “compose” into being.

American composer Ricky Ian Gordon (b. 1956) published musical settings of Hughes’s poems in 1993 and 1997, thereby composing a more contemporary reading of Hughes and, at the same time, an opportunity for audiences to enter into Hughes’s poetic and racial world via Gordon’s emotionally charged, well-crafted, and accessible music. The result is a brilliant amplification and expansion of Hughes’s meanings, and one that brings into the present our own possibilities for “composing a world.” Join us for a live performance and discussion of Gordon’s settings.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinator


Surrealism, Stenography and the Ouija Board

Please join us this Friday, April 10th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided to accompany this talk.

Abigail Susik, Assistant Professor of Art Historysusik_sm

Title: “Surrealism, Stenography and the Ouija Board”

Abstract: “Automatism” was an aesthetic concept and practice that the French Surrealists famously borrowed from the new field of psychoanalysis just after World War I. Starting around 1919, artists and writers such as André Breton and Max Ernst systematically began to investigate the human mind as a source of unconscious and marvelous artistic material, an exploration which soon became the ideological foundation for the Modern Art movement called “Surrealism.”

Several of the Surrealists were veterans of the Great War, and some of them were also medical interns at the Front who had practiced Psychiatry on victims of war trauma. Following the war, these Surrealists often gathered together to play writing and drawing games meant to cultivate unconscious outpourings. Some of the participants even fell into deep trances and uttered fantastic thoughts which were transcribed by other members of the group into a strange kind of dream poetry.

My recent research attempts to extend beyond the now-familiar idea that Surrealism is primarily a product of psychoanalysis. This presentation questions whether there might be a productive comparison between Surrealism and the post-World War I Ouija Board craze in the United States and England, or that matter, between Surrealism and the rise of a secretarial trade for women at this time. Both of these phenomena, the Ouija Board and the influx of women as copyists or stenographers, are direct results of the Great War, and both focus on the same kind of passive “dictation” that so fascinated the Surrealists as the best means of accessing the unconscious. What is the significance of these broad contextual parallels?

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinator


Faculty Works Display, Spring 2015

The Hatfield Library will have a large selection of faculty works on display on the first floor of the library from April 1st through May 18th (after graduation).  The collection ranges from models of theatre productions to selections of scholarly research articles and books written by Willamette faculty.  Please feel free to read the articles written by our faculty.  Below are some photos of this year’s exhibit.

 

faculty-11Willamette “Faculty at Work”
faculty-1Chris Smith – Biology Department
faculty-12Selected Faculty Works on Display
faculty-2Emma Coddington – Biology Department
faculty-13Articles by Willamette Faculty
faculty-3Courtney Stevens – Psychology Department
faculty-14 Prints by Art Faculty
faculty-4James Thompson – Art Department
faculty-15 Photos of Theatre Productions
faculty-5Ellen Eisenberg – History Department
faculty-16 Model Design of Theatre Stages
faculty-6Juwen Zhang – Chinese Studies
faculty-17Artistic pieces by Art Faculty
faculty-8Karen Holman – Chemistry Department
faculty-18Sculpture by Art Faculty
faculty-9Alexandra Opie – Art Department
faculty-19 Book publication with Excerpts
faculty-10Bill Smaldone – History Department

Faculty Colloquium: “Sympathy for the Many”

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 3rd at 2:00 pm in the Library Instruction Room of the Hatfield Library for the sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided to accompany this talk. (Please note the change of time and location).

Stephanie DeGooyer, Assistant Professor of English degooyer

“Sympathy for the Many: Can the Novel Represent the Multitude?”

Abstract: Historians of the novel argue that many different readers in the eighteenth century were able to imagine the interior lives of singular protagonists such as Clarissa or Pamela. In this talk I consider if the reverse is possible: can the fictional imagination of one singular person comprehend the enslavement of millions of people? Can one author, one novel, or one protagonist, represent and comprehend the suffering of a multitude or species? Focusing for the most part on eighteenth-century novelist Laurence Sterne and his relationships to freed slave Ignatius Sancho and moral sense philosopher Adam Smith, this talk argues that there is a basic conflict between social and political demands for equality and fictionalized representations of suffering – and that this conflict cannot be simply dismissed as narcissism. Instead, I suggest that the novel is a limited form for the representation of the multitude, and it is from this space of limitation that it must uniquely address the world.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinator

NB: Bobby Brewer-Wallin had to cancel his previously advertised presention on “My Case Is Altered or Bodies of Elizabeth: Code-switching in Solo Performance.” Luckily we were able to get Stephanie DeGooyer to speak instead.


Spring Break Hours, 2015

b-bksStarting Friday, March 19th, the library will switch to Spring Break hours.  Visit the calendar at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar/.  These are the library’s hours during Spring Break.

Friday, March 20, 7:45 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday, March 21, Closed

Sunday, March 22, Closed

Monday, March 23-March 27, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday, March 28, Closed

Sunday, March 29, 1 p.m – 2 a.m.

 


2015 Edible Book Festival Results

Fourth Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our fourth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 11th, 2015, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners!!!  Karen Wilkens, Grace Pochis, Robert Minato, Carol Drost, and Elaine Goff.  It was fun to see these artistic-flavored literary inspirations.  What a delicious way to spend an afternoon.  Congratulations to our five winners!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event.

 

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
e14 “Humpty Dumpty”

Created by
Karen Wilkens
Inspired by
William Wallace Denslow’s
“Humpty Dumpty”
People’s Choice
e3 “The Most Delicious Trojan War

Created by
Grace Pochis
Inspired by
Homer’s
“The Illiad”
Best Student Entry
e11 A Confederacy of Lunches

Created by
Robert Minato
Inspired by
John Kennedy Toole’s
“A Confederacy of Dunces”
Most Creative
e5 Ketchup in the Rye

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
J.D. Salinger’s
“A Catcher in the Rye”
Most Literary
e18-3 “The Maize Runner

Created by
Elaine Goff
Inspired by
James Dashner’s
“The Maze Runner”
Punniest

 

Other Entries …………………………….. ……………………………..
e1 “Hairy Pot and the Deathly Marshmallows”

Created by
Lucas Rigsby
Inspired by
J. K. Rowling’s
“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”
e2 “Hamlet”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
William Shakespeare’s
“Hamlet”
e4 “The Salad of the Bad Cafe”

Created by
Erica Miller
Inspired by
Carson McCullers’
“The Ballad of the Sad Cafe”
e6 “The Lorax”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Dr. Seuss’
“The Lorax”
e7 “The Tender’s Shame”

Created by
Kelly Slaughter
Inspired by
Orson Scott Card’s
“Ender’s Game”
e8 “Cats in Jam or Kids”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Rudolph Dirks’s
“Katzenjammer Kids”
e9 “5280 Feet”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Stephen King’s
“The Green Mile”
e10 “50 Shades of Grey(tings)”

Created by
Anonymous
Inspired by
E L James
“50 Shareds of Grey”
e12-2 “Against: the Grains”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Mark Hatfield’s
“Against the Grain”
 e13 “Fish in Thyme”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
Laurel Bradley‘s
“A Wish in Time”
e15 “The Candy Shop Wars”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Brandon Mull’s
“The Candy Shop Wars”
e16 “A Tail of Two Kitties”

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Charles Dickens’s
“A Tail of Two Cities”
e17 “Ginger Pie”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Eleanor Estes’
“Ginger Pye”
e19 “50 Shades of Earl Grey”

Created by
Bev Ecklund
Inspired by
E.L. James’
“50 Shades of Grey”
e20 “The Great Catsby”

Created by
Georgia Mayfield
Inspired by
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s
“The Great Gatsby”
e21 “Twelve Inches of Paradise”

Created by
Emma Jones
Inspired by
John Kennedy Toole’s
“A Confederacy of Dunces”
  Additional Photos
carol-drost

Carol Drost

Most Literacy Award

 hamlet “Hamlet”
karen-wilkens Karen Wilkens

People’s Choice Award

candyshop-wars “Candy Shop Wars”
grace-pochis Grace Pochis

Best Student Entry Award

judges-decision Judges Decisions:
Mike Chasar (English), Karen Wood (University Chaplain), and Kaitlen McPherson (CLA student)
robert-minato Robert Minato

Most Creative Award

judges-decision2 Anticipating the Results
elaine-goff

Elaine Goff

Punniest Award

tail-of-two-cats “A Tail of Two Kitties”
great-catsby “The Great Catsby” voting Reviewing the entries before casting a vote for the People’s Choice Award
cats-in-jam-or-kids “Cats in Jam or Kids” buffet Buffet of Entries

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 2014, 2013, and 2012.


WEDNESDAY!!! Edible Book Festival Reminder

Just a quick reminder about tomorrow’s (Wed) Edible Book Festival!

Grab some food and see what you come up with.  Here are some ideas from the Seattle Public Library’s Edible Book Festival, if you need inspiration:

hunger-games

 

 

 

 

“The Hunger Games”

lord-of-fries

 

 

 

 

“The Lord of the Flies”

the-help

 

 

 

 

“The Help”

scarlet-letter

 

 

 

 

“The Scarlet Letter”

war-peace

 

 

 

 

“War & Peace”

A full description of the event and photos of last year are available at:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2015/02/23/2015-edible-book-festival/