2015 EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL

The Mark O. Hatfield Library invites you to participate in the fourth annual EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL!

Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Hatfield Room.edible-books-2015

In conjunction with the International Edible Book Festival, we are pleased to sponsor this fun and creative event again this year. Use your artistic talents or your punny side to make an edible creation inspired by a literary title, author, or character. Pick your favorite mystery, poem, or character from a children’s book—the only limit is your imagination.

Some of last year’s entries are show below. For additional inspiration and ideas, check out these Edible Book Festival entries from Seattle Public Library and Duke University, or check out flickr. Your entry doesn’t need to be baked or cooked, but it does need to be made of something edible!

Free to enter– no registration required. Drop off your entry in the Hatfield Room on March 11 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. If you have a copy of the book that inspired your creation, bring it along and we will include it in the display. Come in to cast a vote for your favorite edible book until 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided!

All entries will be on display from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Even if you don’t enter, you can cast a vote for your favorite edible book. At 4:30 p.m., our esteemed panel of judges– Mike Chasar (English), Karen Wood (University Chaplain), and Kaitlen McPherson (CLA student) — will announce the prizes for:

Best Student Entry

Most Literary

Most Creative

Punniest

People’s Choice

Bistro gift cards will be given to this year’s winners. To view all photos of last year’s entries, go to:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2014/03/20/edible-book-festival-results-2014/

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu

Last year’s winners:

Award Winners
war-and-peas2 “War and Peas”

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
People’s Choice
pitcher-dory-gray “Pitcher of Dory in Gray

Created by Emily Wetherford
Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s
Portrait of Dorian Gray”
Best Student Entry
dune He Who Controls the
Spice Controls the Universe

Created by Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by Frank Herbert’s
“Dune”
Most Creative
war-and-peas War and Peas

Created by Alice French
Inspired by Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Most Literary
wholey-bible2 The Hole-y Bible

Created by Anna Corner
Inspired by “The Holy Bible”
Punniest

Spring Break Hours, 2015

b-bksStarting Friday, March 19th, the library will switch to Spring Break hours.  Visit the calendar at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar/.  These are the library’s hours during Spring Break.

Friday, March 20, 7:45 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday, March 21, Closed

Sunday, March 22, Closed

Monday, March 23-March 27, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday, March 28, Closed

Sunday, March 29, 1 p.m – 2 a.m.

 


2015 Edible Book Festival Results

Fourth Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our fourth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 11th, 2015, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners!!!  Karen Wilkens, Grace Pochis, Robert Minato, Carol Drost, and Elaine Goff.  It was fun to see these artistic-flavored literary inspirations.  What a delicious way to spend an afternoon.  Congratulations to our five winners!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event.

 

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
e14 “Humpty Dumpty”

Created by
Karen Wilkens
Inspired by
William Wallace Denslow’s
“Humpty Dumpty”
People’s Choice
e3 “The Most Delicious Trojan War

Created by
Grace Pochis
Inspired by
Homer’s
“The Illiad”
Best Student Entry
e11 A Confederacy of Lunches

Created by
Robert Minato
Inspired by
John Kennedy Toole’s
“A Confederacy of Dunces”
Most Creative
e5 Ketchup in the Rye

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
J.D. Salinger’s
“A Catcher in the Rye”
Most Literary
e18-3 “The Maize Runner

Created by
Elaine Goff
Inspired by
James Dashner’s
“The Maze Runner”
Punniest

 

Other Entries …………………………….. ……………………………..
e1 “Hairy Pot and the Deathly Marshmallows”

Created by
Lucas Rigsby
Inspired by
J. K. Rowling’s
“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”
e2 “Hamlet”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
William Shakespeare’s
“Hamlet”
e4 “The Salad of the Bad Cafe”

Created by
Erica Miller
Inspired by
Carson McCullers’
“The Ballad of the Sad Cafe”
e6 “The Lorax”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Dr. Seuss’
“The Lorax”
e7 “The Tender’s Shame”

Created by
Kelly Slaughter
Inspired by
Orson Scott Card’s
“Ender’s Game”
e8 “Cats in Jam or Kids”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Rudolph Dirks’s
“Katzenjammer Kids”
e9 “5280 Feet”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Stephen King’s
“The Green Mile”
e10 “50 Shades of Grey(tings)”

Created by
Anonymous
Inspired by
E L James
“50 Shareds of Grey”
e12-2 “Against: the Grains”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Mark Hatfield’s
“Against the Grain”
 e13 “Fish in Thyme”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
Laurel Bradley‘s
“A Wish in Time”
e15 “The Candy Shop Wars”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Brandon Mull’s
“The Candy Shop Wars”
e16 “A Tail of Two Kitties”

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Charles Dickens’s
“A Tail of Two Cities”
e17 “Ginger Pie”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Eleanor Estes’
“Ginger Pye”
e19 “50 Shades of Earl Grey”

Created by
Bev Ecklund
Inspired by
E.L. James’
“50 Shades of Grey”
e20 “The Great Catsby”

Created by
Georgia Mayfield
Inspired by
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s
“The Great Gatsby”
e21 “Twelve Inches of Paradise”

Created by
Emma Jones
Inspired by
John Kennedy Toole’s
“A Confederacy of Dunces”
  Additional Photos
carol-drost

Carol Drost

Most Literacy Award

 hamlet “Hamlet”
karen-wilkens Karen Wilkens

People’s Choice Award

candyshop-wars “Candy Shop Wars”
grace-pochis Grace Pochis

Best Student Entry Award

judges-decision Judges Decisions:
Mike Chasar (English), Karen Wood (University Chaplain), and Kaitlen McPherson (CLA student)
robert-minato Robert Minato

Most Creative Award

judges-decision2 Anticipating the Results
elaine-goff

Elaine Goff

Punniest Award

tail-of-two-cats “A Tail of Two Kitties”
great-catsby “The Great Catsby” voting Reviewing the entries before casting a vote for the People’s Choice Award
cats-in-jam-or-kids “Cats in Jam or Kids” buffet Buffet of Entries

For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 2014, 2013, and 2012.


WEDNESDAY!!! Edible Book Festival Reminder

Just a quick reminder about tomorrow’s (Wed) Edible Book Festival!

Grab some food and see what you come up with.  Here are some ideas from the Seattle Public Library’s Edible Book Festival, if you need inspiration:

hunger-games

 

 

 

 

“The Hunger Games”

lord-of-fries

 

 

 

 

“The Lord of the Flies”

the-help

 

 

 

 

“The Help”

scarlet-letter

 

 

 

 

“The Scarlet Letter”

war-peace

 

 

 

 

“War & Peace”

A full description of the event and photos of last year are available at:

http://library.willamette.edu/wordpress/blog/2015/02/23/2015-edible-book-festival/


Saturday: Willamette Hosts “Poetry Out Loud”

Poetry Out Loud Oregon State Championships at Willamette this Saturday

From 1-4pm in the Hatfield Room of the Main Library this coming Saturday, March 14, Willamette will be hosting the Oregon state championships of Poetry Out Loud — the nationally-conducted poetry memorization and recitation competition in which high school students vie for $50,000 in awards and a place in the national finals held each year in Washington, D.C.

This Saturday’s event is free and open to the public, and I’d invite you to stop by and appreciate the dedication and moving performances of Oregon’s top competitors who will arrive on campus having already succeeded at the school/district and regional levels. One of them will represent Oregon at the national level this coming April.

Interested in learning more about this great program which is sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation in conjunction with local and state art agencies? Check out Poetry Out Loud at http://www.poetryoutloud.org/. See you at the Hatfield Room on Saturday!

Questions? Shoot an email to Chasar at mchasar@willamette.edu.


Friday: “Unexpected Writing” Talk by Bill Duvall

duvallPlease join us this Friday, March 13th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided to accompany this talk.

Bill Duvall, Professor of History

“Unexpected Writing from an Engaged Intellectual: Ahmed Kalouaz and Adolescent Literature”

Abstract: Ahmed Kalouaz is a contemporary French writer of Algerian descent. He is part of the second generation coming out of the immigrant communities, a group that arrived on the French literary and political scene in the 1980s. I will shift my focus a bit in this presentation. Kalouaz has been writing adolescent literature over the past 8 years in an effort to help the third and fourth generations better understand their predicament in the face of the racism and social injustice they experience in the streets of France. Initially I was going to reflect on that literature and on Kalouaz’s continued role as engaged intellectual. But I received a manuscript from Kalouaz on 9 January in which he weaves a number of things together, including the search for his grandfather’s story which ended in his death just after World War II. I will talk about the novels Kalouaz has written in the effort to bring to life the life of his father and the generation of immigrants to France that surrounded him. Because of his father’s unlettered silence (so common to his generation), Kalouaz has had to invent a history and a social memory. What runs through the stories he tells about his family is the memory of the brutal French Algerian war. In Kalouaz’s mind, it cuts like a knife through contemporary French society as the French continue to live out the consequences of that war. The arrival of his manuscript on 9 January seems to bring an uncanny focus on the heritage of the war.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


The Rex Amos Papers in the Willamette Archives

4099
Photo by Pete Beattie

Collage artist Rex Amos was born on August 13, 1935 in Wallace, Idaho to Frenche Harland “Bud” Amos and Jean (Johnstone) Amos. Amos was raised in Burke, Idaho, moving with his parents and brother, Clinton, to Portland, Oregon around the age of seven. Amos graduated from Washington High School in 1953 and was drafted into the U.S. Army shortly thereafter. Having grown up near Mt. Hood, Amos’s first choice would have been to be on the Army ski patrol, but instead he served as a machine gunner in the infantry from 1954 to 1956 because of his excellent marksmanship. Upon Amos’s return from the Army, his father made two attempts on Amos’s life. These assaults by his father continued a pattern of abuse, which had been prevalent throughout Amos’s childhood. To break the cycle of violence that had been visited upon the family, Amos moved his mother to a flat in Southeast Portland. It was there he met his future wife, Diane Smith.

In around 1960 Amos, Diane, and his mother Jean moved to The Village, a neighborhood in Southwest Portland full of musicians, writers, and artists. There Amos’s creativity blossomed. A jazz drummer at this time, he broke the world record for marathon drumming, playing for 82 hours. When the musicians union revoked his union card for playing this unsanctioned job, Amos moved to Big Sur, California, with friend Ron Marcus. He and Marcus worked at the Big Sur Inn and lived in a shack under a bridge. It was there Amos found his passion for creating art. Having little money for supplies, Amos began creating assemblages from materials he found in the area. At the time, Amos considered his work more an expression of political and social critique than an aesthetic creation.

Prior to this, Amos had begun studying at Portland State University (PSU) majoring in philosophy and literature and was awarded his B. S. in 1969. In the midst of his study, he befriended PSU philosophy professor Dr. Graham P. Conroy. While a student, Amos conceived and named the philosophy of Preliminism in the early 1960s. He then gave Preliminism to Conroy because Conroy deemed the giving of philosophy impossible.

After moving to a large house behind a dry cleaners on S. W. 11th and Montgomery near Portland State, Amos was able to obtain a dump license which made it possible for him to collect materials for assemblages. On a trip to New York City with friend Greg Stone in 1961, Amos visited the Museum of Modern Art and saw “The Art of Assemblage” exhibit where he was amazed to discover that he had been creating works similar to those on display.

When the city stopped issuing dump licenses, Amos turned to paper as a medium of expression. He gained much of his artistic training and inspiration through practice and by studying other artists. Meeting the painter Matt Glavin, who was teaching at UC Berkeley, transformed Amos’s vision. Glavin introduced him to the process of chine collé and made it possible for him to use the facilities at Magnolia Editions. Amos has continued to work in assemblage as well as in various forms of collage.

A signature of Amos’s collages are the images he uses, which are meticulously cut from published materials using scissors intended for eye surgery – a process that has earned him the moniker “The Cutter.” Amos then carefully selects from thousands of these images to create detailed collages infused with literary, historical, religious, and philosophical allusions. Amos’s collages have been featured in galleries and museums such as the Portland Art Museum, Magnolia Editions, the Corvallis Art Center, the 12×16 Gallery, and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art. Many of these are in the style of chine collé, which is a combination of collage and print-making techniques.

After more than 50 years in Portland, Amos and Diane, a retired secondary school English teacher, now live in Cannon Beach, Oregon. For more information on Amos, visit his website.


Content Description

The Rex Amos papers are a collection of artwork, journals and diaries, biographical material, correspondence, photographs, and writings compiled by Amos. The collection also contains an oral history interview conducted with Amos in 2014. A wealth of information about Amos’s life can be found in his correspondence and writings gathered largely from the mid-1950s to the 2010s. He documents his challenging childhood, his feelings about contemporary events, and the trials of friends and family’s diseases, deaths, and suicides. Amos’s oral history provides context to his papers and to his artwork. His correspondence reveals information about his own life as well as of the lives of those with whom he is writing, giving a unique look at life in Oregon and California through the second half of the twentieth century. There is video, newspaper, and Amos’s written documentation of his care for his mother, Jean, while she had Alzheimer’s disease. The Rex Amos papers represent Amos’s lifetime as an artist: as an extra in Paint Your Wagon; as a jazz drummer in Portland; as an assemblage artist of materials near his home in Big Sur, California; as a collage artist creating ‘gutterscapes’ from scraps of used paper; to a collage artist creating chine collé for art galleries and museums in Oregon and California.

These papers also represent Amos’s life as a philosopher. Amos conceived and named the philosophy of Preliminism, the theory and practice of practice. Preliminism is represented throughout Amos’s papers, mentioned in correspondence, in his writing and referenced in news articles related to his work. His papers also reflect his life as a fly fisherman, clammer, and overall outdoorsman.

Along with Amos’s own materials are those that he has gathered about friends and other Pacific Northwest artists. These include artwork, books, photographs, video, and writings of Amos’s family and many area artists. Amos’s wife, Diane, assisted in the organization and appraisal of the materials, adding context to much of the materials and many of the people featured in the papers. The Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University has a collection of Amos’s artwork.

This information was originally written by Ashley Toutain, Processing Archivist and Records Manager at the Mark O. Hatfield Library for the Rex Amos papers collection. For additional info, visit:
http://libmedia.willamette.edu/cview/archives.html#!doc:page:eads/4231

The source of the images below come from:
http://www.willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2012-13/amos_gallery/index.html#0

 

01 02 03 04

Echoes of the Folkelig Tradition

Holland-PhillipsPlease join us this Friday, March 6th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the fifth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided to accompany this talk.

Dr. Holland Phillips, Instructor of Violin & Viola, Department of Music

Echoes of the Folkelig Tradition in Carl Nielsen’s Præludium og Tema med Variationer, Op. 48″

Abstract: By the time Carl Nielsen composed the Præludium og Tema med Variationer, Op. 48in 1923, the composer had been heavily invested in creating Danish folkelige songs. Especially in the wake of the First World War and the recent reunification of northern Slesvig with Denmark, the folkelig song style had become emblematic of national Danish unity, and Nielsen was intimately tied to this heightened symbolism. The Danish folkelig song tradition is readily identifiable in the tema of the Op. 48, and I argue that the composer arranges the melody from his song Je så kun tilbage [I merely looked back]as the basis of the Op. 48’s theme. In stark stylistic contrast, the prelude that precedes this tema is among Nielsen’s most overtly modernist statements. Within the composition, Nielsen explores the virtuosic extremes of the violin and ventures beyond tonality, yet he presents a distinctively Danish folk character in the theme. Finding these two stylistic voices confined within a single opus helps us to more thoroughly explore the nature of Nielsen’s dual musical identity: a composer of international stature, versed in early twentieth-century notions of European musical modernism, and a composer of Danish traditional folkelige songs.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


New to the Archives

page050We received a wonderful piece of Willamette History last month – a bag and memorabilia given to Alumni Relations from Marian Pope.
Marian entered Willamette University in 1932 living in Lausanne Hall. She meticulously calculated her every purchase into a notebook and saved each receipt. It is a wonderful look into the life of a Willamette freshman in 1932.

 

In addition to living in Lausanne, Marian was a member of the Daleth Teth Gimel Hebrew letter society. Daleth Teth Gimel, organized at Willamette in 1929, was Willamette’s first national social organization for undergraduate women. In 1939 the name was changed to Dalda Dau Gamma.

Come to the Archives to find other pieces of the Willamette student experience.

(Originally posted on Tuesday, February 17th, 2015 at 6:05 pm by on the archives blog).

Pope2
The Willamette Bearcat towers over campus on Marian’s bag.

Kelley Strawn Faculty Colloquium

strawnPlease join us Friday, February 27th at 3:00 pm in the Hatfield Room for the third Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided to accompany this talk.

Kelley Strawn, Associate Professor of Sociology

What’s Behind All This ‘Nones’-Sense? – Examining Religious Non-Affiliation in the United States Over Time”

Abstract: In this talk, I will present the results of my recent research examining whether predictors – or “causes” – of religious non-affiliation in the United States have changed over the last forty years.  While the popular media and political “messagers” like to latch onto particular explanations for the rise of religious non-affiliation, evidence suggests that (a) it is very difficult  to characterize or predict who does or does not self-describe as “non-affiliated”; and (b) that those factors that do provide some degree of explanation have changed over time.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and James Miley
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators