New Art Acquisitions

The Three artworks on view here at the Mark O. Hatfield Library are on loan from the Hallie Ford Museum of Art at Willamette University.  Located at the corner of State Street and Cottage Street, the museum serves as a cultural and educational resource for the university, the city of Salem, and the entire Northwest region.

The selections of display represent recent acquisitions to the Northwest collection by the museum over the past year.  The museum collection focuses on art from the region — including deep holdings of modern and contemporary art from Oregon and Washington as well as an extensive Native American basket collection.  In addition, the museum has built a broad study collection of art from Ancient Mediterranean, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Oceania.

The artists represented in this exhibition include three Northwest painters Alden Mason (Seattle), Jackie Johnson (Portland), and Bonnie Schulte (Salem).

Below are photos from the exhibit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


New Interface to the Library Catalog

This summer we will be transitioning to a new user interface for the library catalog. We will be transitioning to this new interface in late July 2017.

Designed with the user experience in mind, the interface from ExLibris should be more intuitive and make finding resources easier. As we make this transition, let us know if you have any comments or questions about the new catalog. Feel free to use this form to send us your comments.


LGBT Pride Month

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month is celebrated each year in June to honor the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City. These spontaneous demonstrations by the LGBT community occurred in protest over police raids at the Stonewall Inn, a well-known gay club in Manhattan. The Stonewall riots are considered by many to be the tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States. “The purpose of the commemorative month is to recognize the impact that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals have had on history locally, nationally, and internationally.” Library of Congress, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month

As a tribute to LGBT Pride Month, we’re highlighting a selection of recent books related to the LGBT community on our WU Reads Reading Guide.  Take a look!


Squirrel Kidnapped

We currently have a mini-archives exhibit all about squirrels on display on the first floor of the library. There are tidbits of info about our infamous squirrels, including a petition that went to Governor McCall in the 1970s to declare the squirrels an endangered species near Willamette University and the Oregon State Capitol Building. Two separate Willamette Collegian articles are highlighted that accused Longview, Washington of stealing squirrels.  These two articles started the controversy surrounding the squirrel-napping.

Did you know that Willamette University’s squirrel population is made up of grey squirrels?  The grey squirrels were brought as a gift for the school in the 1880s.  Unfortunately, grey squirrels are an invasive species to the Pacific Northwest and displace red squirrels.  

Thank you Kate Kerns, intern in our Archives and Special Collections for pulling this exhibit together with materials from our Archives and Special Collections.

 

 


Graduation and Gratitude

Graduation season is upon us so it is time for the graduates to be thankful that they successfully made it through the labyrinth. And to be thankful for parents, families, friends, professors and all those who helped them earn that degree. The tassel is worth the hassle! In honor of graduation and gratitude, check out a few related books listed on our Reading Guide.

You are educated. Your certification is in your degree. You may think of it as the ticket to the good life. Let me ask you to think of an alternative. Think of it as your ticket to change the world. — Tom Brokaw

Congratulations, graduates!


Thank you to the Circulation Desk Student Employees

At the Hatfield Library, Circulation Desk student employees are integral to daily operations. Student employees open and close the library, check items in and out, reshelve library materials, ensure items are in correct order, perform building walkthroughs, troubleshoot a variety of technology issues including printer problems, and most importantly, assist any person in the library who needs help. They have answered their fair share of unusual questions and spearheaded or assisted with many different library-related projects. We want to say thank you to all our student employees for their dedication and hard work during the last academic year.

And we would like to say a special thanks and goodbye to our ten graduating seniors:

Maya Jaramillo
Kaitlen McPherson
Rachel Carstensen
Kelly Jones
Isabel Seiden
Sidney Gallardo
Alexander Tripp
Bridget Wulfing
Hiromi Homma
Susana Hernandez

We are particularly grateful to Maya and Kaitlen, who have been working at the Circulation Desk since the beginning of their first year. They have worked hundreds of hours and helped countless people in the library…thanks so much for everything!

Maya Jaramillo

Kaitlen McPherson

 

 

 

 


Finals Week Extended Study Hours

During finals week, the Hatfield Library is open extra hours to help students studying for finals exams. A reference librarian is available for research help until 5 p.m., and we will begin putting out cookies and coffee the first night before Finals until they run out after 10 p.m. if you need a brain food break! Don’t forget the printer in the 24-hour Fish Bowl.
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  • Thurs, May 4: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Fri, May 5: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sat, May 6: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sun, May 7: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 8: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 9: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 10: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Thur, May 11: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri, May 12:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat, May 13:  Noon – 4 p.m.
  • Sun, May 14:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Mon, May 16:  Summer Schedule begins: Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  CLOSED Saturday, Sunday and holidays.

Faculty Colloquium, Seth Cotlar

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 28th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our tenth and final Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Seth Cotlar, Professor of History
 

Title:  What the Nostalgic Subject Knows: Nostalgia, the Nineteenth Century Archive, and the Melancholy History of Modernization in Antebellum America

This talk will be drawn from my ongoing book project entitled “When The Olden Days Were New: A Cultural History of Nostalgia in Modernizing America, 1776-1860.”   In the 1820s and 1830s there emerged a new category of people–self-described “antiquaries” and lovers of “the olden times.”  By the 1840s, just about every town or county had a small community of quirky amateur historians.  These librarians, bank clerks, widows, and lawyers collected old books and manuscripts, hoarded old tools and objects, donned “old fashioned” clothing, filled their houses with anachronistic furniture, drew sketches of old houses before they were about to be torn down, and regaled anyone who would listen with stories from “the olden days” that they had gleaned from their conversations with local octogenarians.  In an era when most of their contemporaries could have cared less about history (Independence Hall, for example, was almost torn down and replaced with a more modern building in the 1820s), this community of eccentrics produced hundreds of local histories (such as this gripping, 400+ page history of Newbury, Newburyport, and West Newbury) and founded dozens of historical societies.  This work matters, because the material they collected formed the foundation of the modern historical archive that we now use to reconstruct the history of early North America. In this talk, I will critically interrogate the nostalgic impulses that animated this work of recovery and preservation.  For the most part, these builders of the archive have been looked down upon, if not entirely ignored, by professional historians because of their unseemly, melancholy attachment to objects and documents from the “obsolete” past.  Their emotional investment in their work disqualified them as “serious” scholars for a profession eager to define itself as rigorously modern and empirical.  But I argue that the melancholy, nostalgic sensibility of these early nineteenth century historians is precisely what enabled them to see certain features of the American past that many of their more forward-looking contemporaries wished to forget.  Indeed, we are now able to tell more capacious and creative histories of early America today, in part, because of the radically inclusive work of preservation carried out by this first generation of nostalgic hoarders, and eccentric lovers of “the olden times.”

Students are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Lecture by Gordon-Reed and Onuf

The History Department invites you to attend a lecture by historians Annette Gordon-Reed, Professor at Harvard Law School and Pulitzer-Prize Winning author of The Hemingses of Monticello, and Peter Onuf, UVA emeritus, founder of the Backstory! Podcast, and author of numerous books on Thomas Jefferson.  The talk will take place on Monday April 24 at 7pm in the Hatfield Room.

Gordon-Reed and Onuf will give a talk based on their recently published and widely-acclaimed book “The Most Blessed of the Patriarchs: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination.”  We hope to see you there!

For questions about this lecture, please contact Seth Cotlar (scotlar@willamette.edu) from the History Department.


2017 Faculty Works Exhibit

The Mark O. Hatfield Library has on display a number of select faculty works now through May 15th, 2017.  These displays are are located on the first floor, and consist of a number of faculty publications (books and articles), and works of art (photos and studio art).  For the first time, there is also a display which highlight video clips of a theater production. Below are a photos from this exhibit.