Fall Semester Hours

We will continue our shortened building hours throughout the week of August 22nd (8 am – 5 pm).  On Saturday we will be open 10-4pm, but closed all day Sunday.  Monday, August 29, the first day of class, our hours will extend to 8 am – Midnight.

Our full semester hours will begin Monday, August 5th (7:45 am – 2 am) weekdays, Saturdays (10 am – 9 pm), and Sundays (10 am – 2 am).

Details at: http://library.willamette.edu/about/calendar/

 

the-eleventh-hour-1364077_960_720

(Image source: Pixabay.com)


Welcome (Back)

Welcome to the Mark O. Hatfield Library, for those who are new to our library.  And welcome back for those who are returning!  We are ready for your return, and hope you’re ready to come back.  As you probably already know, we have top notch librarians to help with your upcoming research, plus excellent tools and resources.

Here is a link to get to a page that will help orient you to our library, or refresh your knowledge.  (And for the record, several Pokemon have been found in and around the library!)


Finals Week: Extended Study Hours

During finals week, the Hatfield Library is open extra hours to help students studying for finals exams. Don’t forget the printer in the 24-hour Fish Bowl.  A reference librarian is available for research help until 5 p.m., and we will begin putting out cookies and coffee the first night before Finals until they run out after 10 p.m. if you need a brain food break!

Here are the hours:

  • Thurs, May 5: 7:45 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Fri, May 6: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sat, May 7: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Sun, May 8: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Mon, May 9: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Tues, May 10: 7 a.m. – 3 a.m.
  • Wed, May 11: 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Thur, May 12: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri, May 13:  8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat, May 14:  Noon – 4 p.m.
  • Sun, May 15:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Mon, May 16:  Summer Schedule begins: Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  CLOSED Saturday, Sunday and holidays.

Faculty Colloquium: What I Learned in Prison

Dear Colleagues, buissm
Please join us this Friday, April 29th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our eleventh and final Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Melissa Buis Michaux, Associate Professor of Politics

Title: What I Learned in Prison

Abstract:  The United States currently incarcerates about 2.4 million men, women and children.  The number of incarcerated does not take into account how many people’s lives are touched by our extensive system of punishment, including those on parole or probation; children of incarcerated parents; and communities that support prison systems.  Furthermore, racial disparities in arrests, sentencing, and prison time call into question our guarantees of equal justice and fundamental fairness.  Inside the prison walls, many prisoners are subject to a system of control that prioritizes punishment over rehabilitation.  All of this I knew before I stepped inside a prison.  Come hear what I learned—about prison, the people behind the walls, and myself—once I went inside.  I will also be joined by some students from my “Reforming Criminal Justice” class that has been going inside the Oregon State Penitentiary this semester and working alongside prisoners.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.
Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Injuring Yourself to Better Health: How Exercise Improves Cardiovascular

lockardsmDear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 22nd at 3 pm. in Collins 205 for our tenth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Michael Lockard, Associate Professor of Exercise Science

Title: Injuring Yourself to Better Health: How Exercise Improves Cardiovascular Health

Abstract:  Regular aerobic activity has long been associated with improved cardiovascular health and decreased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease.  While aerobic exercise training has been repeatedly associated with improvements in risk factors associated with CVD, it appears that training results in an additional reduction in risk independent of the more conventional risk factor.  It has been suggested that a causal link between regular physical activity and reduced CVD risk is mediated through the improvement of endothelial health and associated vascular function.  To this date, however, a specific mechanism for linking the repeated act of exercising and improvement in vascular function has not been established.  It is the goal of this research to elucidate the details of this mechanism.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: La Maldad de Martin Wong: Approximating Nuyorico

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 15th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.Roy Perez

Roy Perez, Assistant Professor of English and American Ethnic Studies

Title: La Maldad de Martin Wong: Approximating Nuyorico

Abstract: Nicknamed “Chino Malo,” gay Chinese-American painter and art collector Martin Wong lived in Manhattan’s Lower East Side in the 1980s, where he circulated among and collaborated with a number of Puerto Rican artists and writers. In this talk, I explore how Wong’s proximity to Nuyorican (Puerto Rican New York) culture appears in and shapes his paintings. I also examine Martin Wong’s presence as a queer Asian American painter in the popular history of Latina/o arts and culture. Often depicting men of color in erotic positions and encounters, Wong’s paintings lurk on the margin of accepted Latino art history, challenging typical representations of Latino masculinity. What happens when we move Wong to the center of Latino art and cultural history? What does Wong’s vision of Nuyorico reveal to us about its people, landscape, and culture? I contend that Wong’s visual poetics enact a series of queer advances that unsettle Nuyorico’s “good” center. Mal movement or comportment—to defer fear of committing maldades and willfully do things badly, wrongly, or approximately—loosens racial identity practices from their toil toward completion and full knowing.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Sister Outsider, April 19

Please join us for the final event in the Spring 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, an evening with acclaimed performance poetry duo Sister Outsider, on Tuesday, April 19. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Cat Cavern, on the second floor the University Center, and is free and open to the public.

Sister Outsider is the award-winning duo of Dominique Christina & Denice Frohman. Both Women of the World Poetry Slam Champions, the pair travel extensively to introduce students to the wider function of language and art as activism. Inspired by the life and work of Audre Lorde, they write and perform their “otherness” into the center and use spoken word as a tool for social change.

Dominique Christina is a writer, performer, educator, and activist. She holds five national titles in the three years she has been competing in slam, including the 2014 & 2012 Women of the World Slam Champion and 2011 National Poetry Slam Champion. She is the only person to have won two Women of the World Poetry Championships. She has published two poetry collections, The Bones, The Breaking, The Balm and They Are All Me.

Denice Frohman is an award-winning poet, lyricist, and educator. She is the 2013 Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion, 2014 Canto Mundo Fellow, 2012 Leeway Transformation Award recipient, and 2013 Hispanic Choice Award winner. Her work has appeared in the Huffington Post and the forthcoming book, Jotas: An Anthology of Queer Latina Voices. Her debut spoken word album, Feels Like Home was released in 2013.

Get a taste of Sister Outsider performing here: http://www.sisteroutsiderpoetry.com/poems

This event is sponsored by the Department of English, Students for Feminism, and the Hallie Ford Chair in Writing.

Scott Nadelson
English Department, Willamette University


2016 Edible Book Festival Results

5th Annual Edible Book Festival Results!!!

Our fifth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on April 1st 2016, in conjunction with the annual International Edible Book Festival. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners who each won a nifty mug:  Joni Roberts, Carol Drost, KayLyn Stirton and Yasmine Robles, Leslie Whitaker, and Dillon Peck.  The exhibits were all deliciously inspired!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event. Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 20152014, 2013, and 2012. For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
09-frosting
“Frosting the Doughman”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
“Frosty the Snowman”
Punniest
06-mandarines “The Mandarins

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
Simone de Beauvoir’s
“The Mandarins”
Most Literary
16-war “War(heads)
and Peas”

Created by
Kaylyn Stirton &
Yasmine Robles
Inspired by
Leo Tolstoy’s
“War and Peace”
Best Student Entry
03-boys The Boys in
the Boat

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Daniel Brown’s
“The Boys in the Boat”
Most Creative
02-marzipan
“The Mars-ipan”

Created by
Dillon Peck
Inspired by
Andy Weir’s
“The Martian”
People’s Choice

 

Other Entries ……………………………..
01-salt “The Salt in Our Stars”

Created by
Audrey Nieswandt
Inspired by
John Green’s
“The Fault in Our Stars”
04-remains “The Remains of the
Day(Night Donuts)”

Created by
Alice French
Inspired by
Kazuo Ishiguro
“The Remains of the Day”
05-three-musketeers “Western Canon”

Created by
Christopher McFetridge
Inspired by
Alexandre Dumas’
“Western Literature:
Three Musketeers”
07-two-cities “It was the Best of Times,
It was the Wurst of Times”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Charles Dicken’s
“A Tale of Two Cities”
08-dirt
“The Good Earth”

Created by
Paul Meuse
Inspired by
Pearl S. Buck’s
“The Good Earth”
10-none
“And Then There
Were None”

Created by
Allison Johnson
Inspired by
Agatha Christie’s
“And Then There Were None”
11-water
“Like Water for Chocolate”

Created by
Allison Johnson
Inspired by
Laura Esquivel’s
“Like Water for Chocolate”
12-gas
“Gone with the Wind: Remembrance of
Things Passed”

Created by
Al Furtwangler
Inspired by
Margaret Mitchell’s
“Remembrance of Things Past
and Gone with the Wind”
13-waldo “Pears Waldo”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
Martin Handford’s
“Where’s Waldo”
14-fish “A String in the Carp”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Nancy Bond’s
“A String in the Harp”
15-bread “Bride and Bread Juices”

Created by
Doreen Simonsen
Inspired by
Jane Austen’s
“Pride and Prejudice”
17-bottles “The Naked Lunch”

Created by
Jason Yelle
Inspired by
William S. Burroughs’
“The Naked Lunch”
18-walk “The Ones Who Walk
Away from the Omelets”

Created by
Bistro
Inspired by
Ursula K. Le Guin’s
“The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”

Faculty Colloquium: The Alexander Technique

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 8th at 3 pm. in the Room 145 of Fine Arts West (Use West Entrance that faces Goudy Hall) for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.Anita King

Anita King, Professor of Music Emerita, Piano

Title: The Alexander Technique: How Our Daily Activities Can Make Us Freer!

Abstract: The Alexander Technique is a simple and practical method for improving ease and freedom of movement, balance, support, and improved coordination. Practice of the Technique refines and heightens kinesthetic sensitivity, offering people a fluid and lively control of their movement. It provides a means whereby the use of a part–a voice or an arm or a leg–is improved by improving the use of the whole body, indeed, the whole self. These benefits are accomplished through a process of self-observation where one becomes intimately aware of one’s movement habits so that one can suspend habitual, often unconscious, muscular tightening where it exists and gradually, consciously, replace it with constructive behavior.

I will lead participants in explorations and activities designed to shed light on several topics related to coordinate movement (and yes, sitting, standing and speaking are movement activities!). These include: becoming more fully embodied by waking up the tactile and kinesthetic senses; sitting and standing with ease by taking full advantage of the weight-bearing capacity of the bony structure; maintaining full-stature by eliminating the distorting effects of unnecessary muscular effort (tension); avoiding isolation and overworking of individual parts by keeping them in continuous relation to the whole body.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Liquid Sky, Faculty Colloquium by Chuck Williamson

williamsonsm

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, April 1st at 3 pm. in the Kremer Board Room (FORD 102) for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.Chuck Williamson, Professor of Chemistry
 

Title: Liquid Sky: Liquid-Liquid Mixtures, Light Scattering, and Critical Behavior

Abstract:  The romance of a bottle of wine and a technicolor sunset – perhaps the perfect pairing of a liquid-liquid mixture with light scattering phenomena. This talk will strive for a second-best pairing by showing how light scattering may be used to understand the physical properties of liquid-liquid mixtures. At first glance, pouring two nonreactive liquids together to make a mixture seems like a very simple physical process. Sometimes two liquids mix completely, like ethanol and water do in alcoholic beverages. Sometimes the liquids stay in two layers and do not mix very much at all, like oil and water. However, many pairs of liquids show both types of behavior: the liquids mix completely for some temperatures and some mixing ratios, but the liquids separate into two layers at other conditions. In this talk I will discuss the laser light scattering method we use to make maps of the exact conditions in which two liquids mix to form a single layer, or phase. I will introduce special points on the maps called critical points, and show the universal and beautiful physical behavior that all liquid-liquid mixtures exhibit at a critical point, like critical opalescence and spinodal decomposition. I will also present a new type of fundamental liquid-liquid phase behavior my students and I have observed here at Willamette. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the complex ways in which light can scatter from a liquid-liquid mixture by incorporating examples of light scattering found in the atmosphere, such as the whiteness of clouds and fog, the blueness of the sky, and solar halos. There is also a brief shout out to Edvard Munch.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Bobby Brewer-Wallin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators