Roger Lowenstein Talk

The Economics Department, with support from the Gillis Fund, is excited to announce a talk by financial writer and bestselling author Roger Lowenstein on Monday, April 3rd at 4:15 p.m.  This event will be held in the Hatfield Room, and is free and open to the public.  There will be a book signing after the talk.

 


Ralph Barnes Correspondence Exhibit

New Exhibit Going up in the Library on March 24th, 2017

UPDATE: The date for this mini exhibit has been delayed.  Additional information will follow as they become available.  (3-24-17)

This exhibit looks at the life and experiences of Ralph Barnes a Willamette University alumni from the class of 1922. Barnes was a foreign correspondent with the New York Herald Tribune. Ralph Barnes worked in Mussolini’s Italy, Joseph Stalin’s Russia, and Adolf Hitler’s Germany. Included in this exhibit are excerpts of Barnes foreign correspondence experience.  This exhibit has been put together by Kate Kerns, our Archives and Special Collections intern.


WU Rook Caps

Our Archives and Special Collections intern Kate Kerns has put together a special mini exhibit on the first floor of the library about Rook Caps based on the materials available in the Willamette University Archives and Special Collections.  This exhibit will be replaced later this week by a new exhibit by Kate Kern, so please take a look before these items are sent back into the archives.  Below are some photos of this fun exhibit, Rook Kaps worn at Willamette, a Rook Bible, photos, and stories that center around Rook Kaps. This is a good example of some of the fun things you can find in our Archives, and what could be learned about them.


Rescheduled Faculty Colloquium

Dear Colleagues,

Thanks to Professor Maegan Parker Brooks, we have been able to reschedule Professor Richards talk, originally scheduled for March 10th.

Please join us on Wednesday, March 22nd from 11:30-12:30 in Montag Den for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester. (Please note change in time and location) Treats will be provided.

Cindy Koenig Richards
, Associate Professor of Civic Communication and Media
 

Title: Learning by Creating in the Public Sphere

This faculty colloquium presentation will connect my scholarly work on agency to our efforts at Willamette “to transform knowledge into action and lead lives of achievement, contribution, and meaning.” My book project, Voters in the Making: Women’s Participatory Culture in the Pacific Northwest, 1865-1912, illuminates a set of practices through which disenfranchised women developed agency in the public sphere. Reflecting on this set of practices–and their relationship to liberal arts education–motivated me to make project based learning integral to my courses. I’ll share my practical approach to designing student projects that are publicly engaged, academically oriented, production centered, and peer supported. And, some students from CCM 361 The Public Sphere will join us to discuss their perspectives on two projects we carried out in fall 2016. First, students in this course led Willamette DebateWatch, a series of events that brought together more than 800 community members to view and discuss the 2016 US Presidential debates. Second, students in this course produced a self-published book of data visualizations, entitled Networked Publics in the 2016 US Presidential Campaign.

Students are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Introducing Selicity Icefire

Please welcome Selicity Icefire, our new Administrative Assistant at the Mark O. Hatfield Library. Selicity came to us this December after working four years at The Avian Medical Center, Oregon’s only bird-only veterinary hospital (other species not welcome).

She has two majors through Portland State University: anthropology (archaeology emphasis) and earth science (geological engineering emphasis). While this is her first time working in a library, Selicity is no stranger to libraries. During her undergrad, she enjoyed spending time in the library, including the Fort Vancouver archives during her field archaeology studies. Interestingly, as an anthropology major Selicity preferred to do the cataloging and records management portion of archaeological digs.

The next time you see Selicity, make sure to ask about her four birds. Three of them are cockatoos and the fourth is a black Greater Vasa Parrot, all of whom are “fairly well behaved boys.” The oldest cockatoo, named Banzai, “owns” two cats (just ask the bird!). The cats, named Captain Jack and Strax, a nod toward the bald alien in the Doctor Who series, are both hairless sphinx. Also Selicity is an avid jammer, as in berry and fruit jam, and usually makes a batch of jam each weekend.

If you need general directions in the Hatfield Library, to setup meetings, questions about paper work, etc. Selicity is a good person to contact. She also helps in the Archives and Special Collections.

Please help welcome Selicity the next time you see her! The photos below are of Selicity and her animals.

 


Results for the Edible Book Festival

Results for the 6th Annual Edible Book Festival!!!

Our sixth annual Edible Book Festival was held in the Hatfield Room on March 10th, 2017. Congrats to our Edible Book Festival winners who each won a $5 Bistro card:  Joni Roberts, Carol Drost, KayLyn Stirton and Yasmine Robles, Leslie Whitaker, and Dillon Peck.  The exhibits were all deliciously inspired!  Below are photos of the entries and the winners and a selection photos of the event. Photos from previous Edible Book Festivals at Willamette can be found here for 20152014, 2013, and 2012. For questions, contact Carol Drost, x6715, cdrost@willamette.edu.

Award Winners  ………………………… ……………
“Brownie Bear, Brownie Bear”

Created by
Mehayla Repplinger
Inspired by Eric Carle’s
“Brown Bear, Brown Bear”
People’s Choice
“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Created by
Liz Perkin & Gabrielle James
Inspired by
Mark Twain’s
“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”
Most Literary
“Midsummer Rice Dream”

Created by
Sara Amato
Inspired by
William Shakespeare’s
“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”
Punniest
“Caesar’s Garlic War”

Created by
Carol Drost
Inspired by
Julius Caesar’s
“Caesar’s Gallic War”
Most Creative

 

 

Other Entries ……………………………..
“Peep Wars”

Created by
Selicity Icefire
Inspired by
George Lucas’
“Star Wars: A New Hope”
Peep Wars “Toot”

Created by
Paul Meuse
Inspired by
Leslie Patricelli’s
“Toot”
Peeps Jackson and the Olive-ians “Peeps Jackson and the
Olive-ians”

Created by
Brianna & Eliane Goff
Inspired by
Rick Rioran’s
“Percy Jackson and the Olympians”
Wild Mountain Thyme “Wild Mountain Thyme”

Created by
Liz Butterfield
Inspired by
Rosamunde Pilcher’s
“Wild Mountain Thyme”
The Rosemary Spell “The Rosemary Spell”

Created by
Shelby Radcliffe & Kendra Mingo
Inspired by
Virginia Zimmerman’s
“The Rosemary Spell”
Many Waters “Many Waters”

Created by
Caleb Repplinger
Inspired by
Madeleine L’Engle’s
“Many Waters”
Celery Stalks at Midnight “Celery Stalks at Midnight”

Created by
Timothy Repplinger
Inspired by
Will Bradley’s
“Celery Stalks at Midnight”

The Done Cow
“The Done Cow”

Created by
John Repplinger
Inspired by
Walter Wangerin’s
“The Book of the Dun Cow”
The Bone People “The Bone People”

Created by
Joni Roberts
Inspired by
Martin Handford’s
“The Bone People”
“One Flew Over the
Cuckoo’s Nest”

Created by
Leslie Whitaker
Inspired by
Ken Kesey’s
“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”
“Double Fudge”

Created by
Amy Amato
Inspired by
Judy Blume’s
“Double Fudge”
“Who Moved my Cheese?”

Created by
Robert Minato
Inspired by
Spencer Johnson’s
“Who Moved my Cheese”

 

 

Extra Photos ………………       ……………..
 

 

 

 

 

 


Steampunk Fiction Lecture

“The Rise and Roots of Steampunk Fiction”
Lecture by Professor Rachel Bowser
Thursday, April 6th4:15 p.m.
Hatfield Room, Hatfield Library

 

Event Description: Once a small subculture, the steampunk phenomenon exploded during the first years of the twenty-first century, its prominence increasing ever since. From its Victorian and literary roots to film and television, video games, music, and even fashion, this subgenre of science fiction reaches far and wide in current culture. Steampunk matters in many ways–from disability and queerness to ethos and digital humanities. This lecture will discuss why we should be paying closer attention to this influential genre.

 

About the Speaker: Dr. Rachel A. Bowser is Associate Professor of English at Georgia Gwinnett College, just north of metro Atlanta. She researches and writes about Victorian fiction and steampunk, and teaches and talks about all kinds of British fiction, science fiction, and composition. In the 2017-2018 academic year, she will serve as a fellow in the American Council on Education leadership program. She is co-author of Like Clockwork: Steampunk Pasts, Presents, & Futures (Minnesota UP, 2016).

 


Faculty Colloquium, Sammy Basu

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, March 17th at 3 pm. in Ford 122for our sixth Colloquium of this semester. (Please note change in location)

Sammy Basu
, Professor of Politics
 

Title: Humoring Democracy:  or Why I Read the Nazis for Laughs

Modernity is hard on us, whence reactions to it abound. However, humor can make it bearable and even pleasurable. In my research I illustrate the argument that modern liberal democracy needs its citizens to have an appropriate sense of humor using the historical record of the Weimar Republic and the Nazi Third Reich culminating with World War II and the Holocaust. I highlight Weimar-era pro-democratic defenders and their cognitive and communicative turns to liberal and leveling humor, and contrast them against Hitler, Goebbels, Rosenberg etc., and their Nazi honor-bound and hierarchic sense of humor. In effect, on this view, the democratic Republic failed because of an irony deficiency and conversely the authoritarian Reich flourished because it contrived to provide German gentiles with the ‘last laugh’. In closing, I will apply this analysis to the contemporary US political situation.

Students are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Colloquium Coordinators


Talk by Vershawn Ashanti Young

“Should Students Use They Own English?” by Vershawn Ashanti Young

Wednesday, March 15, 4:30 p.m.
Location: Hatfield Room

In this talk, Young explains and demonstrates why students must develop agency, authority, and authenticity in all of their writing, and why they must also bring style, substance, and individuality to their writing in school and professional contexts. Young is an Associate Professor in the Department of Drama and Speech Communication and the Department of English at the University of Waterloo, Canada, where he teaches African American rhetoric, performance studies, and public communication. He is author of Your Average Nigga: Performing Race, Literacy, and Masculinity and co-author of Other People’s English: Code Meshing, Code Switching, and African American Literacy.

(Source: Campus events. Image source: University of Iowa)

 


Faculty Colloquium: Cindy Koenig Richards

Dear Colleagues,

Update: This week’s Faculty Colloquium on Learning by Creating in the Public Sphere by Cindy Richards has been cancelled.

 

 

Please join us this Friday, March 10th at 3 pm. in Ford 102 for our sixth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. (Please note change in location) Treats will be provided.

Cindy Koenig Richards
, Associate Professor of Civic Communication and Media

Title: Learning by Creating in the Public Sphere

This faculty colloquium presentation will connect my scholarly work on agency to our efforts at Willamette “to transform knowledge into action and lead lives of achievement, contribution, and meaning.” My book project, Voters in the Making: Women’s Participatory Culture in the Pacific Northwest, 1865-1912, illuminates a set of practices through which disenfranchised women developed agency in the public sphere. Reflecting on this set of practices–and their relationship to liberal arts education–motivated me to make project based learning integral to my courses. I’ll share my practical approach to designing student projects that are publicly engaged, academically oriented, production centered, and peer supported. And, some students from CCM 361 The Public Sphere will join us to discuss their perspectives on two projects we carried out in fall 2016. First, students in this course led Willamette DebateWatch, a series of events that brought together more than 800 community members to view and discuss the 2016 US Presidential debates. Second, students in this course produced a self-published book of data visualizations, entitled Networked Publics in the 2016 US Presidential Campaign.

Students are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators

(Text source by Doreen Simonsen)