Faculty Colloquium: Sarah Bishop

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Sarah Clovis Bishop, Associate Professor of Russian, will talk at this Friday’s Faculty Colloquium on Performing the Poet: Elena Shvarts’s “The Visible Side of Life.” Dec. 2nd @ 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room. Treats will be provided.

In 2010, director Boris Pavlovich and actress Yana Savitskaya created and staged The Visible Side of Life, a one-woman show based on the prose and poetry of Elena Shvarts (1948-2010), a central figure in late Soviet and post-Soviet Russian literature. Then based in Kirov, Russia at the “Theater on Spasskaya,” Savitskaya and Pavlovich had been exploring Shvarts’s verse for over a year, delving into her autobiographical prose to understand it more fully. Just as they were ready to approach the poet about their work, they learned of her death. They abandoned their poetic etudes and turned instead to a dramatic work in which they imagined the last hours of the poet’s life. Pavlovich has described it as a “quasi-biography”; an image of “our Elena Shvarts whom we failed to meet.”

The performance has since traveled to St. Petersburg, Shvarts’s home, and is now part of the repertory at the Bolshoi Drama Theater (BDT). Most recently, the show received its American premiere at Princeton, Harvard, and right here at Willamette. I will discuss the performance in its various incarnations, highlighting the many boundaries that it tests–between reality and fantasy; the visible and invisible; prose and poetry; performer and audience.

All are invited to attend this talk. We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Thanksgiving Break Hours

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The Hatfield Library has special hours during Thanksgiving break.

Fri, Nov. 18     7:45 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat – Sun, Nov. 19 – 20     CLOSED
Mon – Tue, Nov. 21-22     8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Wed, Nov. 23     8 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Thur – Sat, Nov. 24 – 26     CLOSED
Sun, Nov. 27   1 p.m. – 2 a.m.

Normal building hours resume Monday, November 28.  The Hatfield Library staff wish the Willamette Community a most wonderful and safe Thanksgiving Break!


Faculty Colloquium: Rethinking the Oregon Story

Please join us this week, Friday, November 18th at 3 pm. in the foss_smHatfield Room for our ninth Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Christopher Foss
, Adjunct Professor, Tokyo International University of America
 

Title:  Rethinking the Oregon Story: The Importance of International Affairs to Oregon’s Political History Since World War II

Oregon’s political history has traditionally been summed up by a self-confident, even triumphal, phrase: “The Oregon Story”.  In the narrative expounded by proponents of The Oregon Story, visionary political leaders—particularly Governors Tom McCall and Robert Straub—and a variety of like-minded grassroots politicians and activists saved post-World War II Oregon from the urban decay and environmental degradation that plagued many other states.  My work argues, by contrast, that the real Oregon story had less to do with innovations within the state, and more to do with the state’s relationship to the world.  By refocusing Oregon’s political history on elected officials who were active in international affairs, and by analyzing patterns of defense spending, trade, and immigration, this project encourages us to reconceive the Oregon story beyond state—and even national—boundaries.  I contend that after World War II, Oregon became not only a more livable state thanks to McCall and Straub, but, perhaps surprisingly, a more economically and culturally diverse place, thanks to a new focus by its civic, business, and community leaders on the ways it is interconnected with the globe.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Annual Tree of Giving Book Drive

The annual Tree of Giving Book Drive has officially begun.

The Hatfield Library, The Willamette Store and the Bistro are seeking donations of new or slightly used children’s books to be donated to Swegle Elementary School‘s library. We also encourage you to donate hats, gloves and scarves for students at Swegle.

The last day to donate is Tuesday, December 20. Items can be dropped off at The Willamette Store, Hatfield Library, Bistro or Sparks Athletic Center.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask. Attached is an image of the poster for distribution on social media.

Thank you for your support!

 

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Race, Religion, and the Magic of Secularism in Antebellum America

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this week, Friday, November 11th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our eighth Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Alexander Rocklin, Visiting Assistant Professor of Religious Studies

Title: Race, Religion, and the Magic of Secularism in Antebellum AmericaAlexander Rocklin

Come meet the Fakir of Ava, the unrivaled magician and necromancer who will perform scientific illustrations showing through practical experiments the impositions of the Pagan Priesthood ancient and modern! Taking as my example the magician the Fakir of Ava, this talk examines the mid-19th century spectacle of stage-magic performances as a mode of popular secularism in the United States. If we understand secularism not simply as an inevitable political project but what John Modern calls a “conceptual environment” that makes the category religion a self-evident way of dividing up the world, this paper examines one mode through which the religious and the not-religious were naturalized for Americans. Taking religion and race as defined together, I will also analyze the ways in which popular secularism created particular racial-religious hierarchies that drew on and connected Americas to broader trends in colonial knowledge production across the globe. Prepare to be Amazed (or at least educated)!

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium: Doing Data Science

chengsmPlease join us tomorrow, Friday, November 4th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our seventh Faculty Colloquium of this semester.  Treats will be provided.

Haiyan Cheng
, Associate Professor of Computer Science
 
Title:  Doing Data Science

Computational Science and Engineering combines theory and experiments for scientific discovery. It is interdisciplinary in nature, requiring subject knowledge in 1) applied discipline, 2) mathematics and 3) computer science. With the evolutionary extension of statistics capable of dealing with the massive amount of data produced today, data science has becoming the new trend, and it helped scientific discovery extending from natural science to humanities and social sciences.

My research deals with designing new computational algorithms to make forecast models more accurate. Specifically, I optimally combine observational data with the model forecast data through a method called “Data Assimilation”.

In this talk, I will report how the amount of available observational data has changed and inspired my research. I will report two of my sabbatical projects that involving hands-on data science. The first one is my experience participating a Datathon (an intensive programming competition) at a computational social science conference; using social media data to answer U.S. election related questions. The second one is my experience participating a one-week workshop, using real criminal data to infer networks for predictive policing.

Finally, I will talk about the basics in doing data science and introduce commonly used tools.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Hallie Ford Literary Series: New Voices Showcase

Please join us on Wednesday, November 9 for the final event of the Fall 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette, a New Voices Showcase featuring readings by debut fiction writers Margaret Malone and Sara Jaffe. The reading will take place in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library at 5 p.m. and is free and open to the public. Books will be for sale courtesy of the Willamette Store.

Margaret Malone is the author of the story collection People Like You, winner of the Balcones Fiction Prize and a finalist for the PEN Hemingway Award. Her writing has appeared in The Missouri Review, Oregon Humanities, Propeller Quarterly, Coal City Review, Swink, latimes.com, and elsewhere. margaret-maloneShe is a graduate of Humboldt State University with a B.A. in Philosophy and now lives in Portland, Oregon. Margaret has been a volunteer facilitator with the non-profit Write Around Portland and is a co-host of the artist and literary gathering SHARE. She is the recipient of an Oregon Arts Commission Individual Artist Fellowship, two Regional Arts & Culture Council Project Grants and an Oregon Literary Fellowship.

Read Margaret’s story “The Only One” here: http://www.propellermag.com/March2015/MaloneFictionMarch15.html

Sara Jaffe is a fiction writer whose first novel, Dryland, was published by Tin House Books in September 2015. Her short fiction and criticism have appeared in a variety of publications, including Fence, BOMB, NOON, Paul Revere’s Horse, matchbook, and The Los Angeles Review of Books. She co-edited The Art of Touring (Yeti, 2009), an anthology of writing and visual art by musicians drawing on her experience as guitarist for post-punk band Erase Errata. sara-jaffeSara holds a BA from Wesleyan University and an MFA from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and has received fellowships from the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, RADAR Productions, and the Regional Arts and Culture Council. She is also co-founding editor of New Herring Press, a publisher of prose chapbooks.

Read Sara’s story “Stormchasers” here: http://bombmagazine.org/article/10066/stormchasers

For more information, contact:
Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Willamette University
snadelso@willamette.edu
503-370-6290


Hallie Ford Literary Series: Gary Ferguson

Please join us for the second event in the Fall 2016 Hallie Ford Literary Series at Willamette: a reading and discussion of contemporary issues in environmental movements by acclaimed science and nature writer Gary Ferguson on Wednesday, October 12. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hatfield Room of Willamette’s library and is free and open to the public. Books will be available courtesy of the Willamette Store. This event is sponsored by the Learning by Creating Program and the Green Fund.garyferguson

Author of 22 books on science and nature, including the award-winning Hawk’s Rest, published by National Geographic Adventure Press, Gary Ferguson serves as a keynote presenter at conservation and outdoor education gatherings around the country. Over the past twenty five years Gary has traveled thousands of miles down the rivers, trails, and back roads of North America: trekking 500 miles through Yellowstone to write Walking Down the Wild (Simon & Schuster), wandering through the seasons with the first 14 wolves released into Yellowstone National Park for The Yellowstone Wolves: The First Year (Globe Pequot), spending a season in the field at a wilderness therapy program for the best-selling Shouting at the Sky (St. Martin’s Press). His most recent book, The Carry Home, is both a moving celebration of the outdoor life shared between Gary and his wife Jane, who died tragically in a canoeing accident in northern Ontario in 2005, and a chronicle of grief and the healing power of wilderness.carry-home

Gary will be joined by his partner Dr. Mary Clare, an internationally-known scholar whose work in social and cultural psychology and community health initiatives has recently involved environmental justice work with the National Parks and wilderness-based programs for returning veterans. Together they will discuss the shortfalls of modern environmentalism in the twentieth century and new opportunities to bridge environmental and social justice movements.

Listen to an interview with Gary on Oregon Public Broadcasting’s Think Out Loud here: http://www.opb.org/radio/programs/thinkoutloud/segment/gary-ferguson-talks-about-the-carry-home/

For more information, contact:
Scott Nadelson, Hallie Ford Chair in Writing
Willamette University
snadelso@willamette.edu
503-370-6290


Faculty Colloquium: New Statistics

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us this Friday, September 30th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our third Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.friedrich_sm

James Friedrich, Professor of Psychology

Title: The “New Statistics”: Improving Statistical Practices to Benefit Science and the Public

Abstract: Have you ever wondered what it means to say something is “statistically significant”? Would it surprise you to know that many professionals are nearly as confused as the general public? Natural and behavioral scientists have long relied upon the questionable practice of null hypothesis significance testing (NHST), and its logic and language have come to permeate public (mis)understandings of statistical evidence. Newer data analytic approaches emphasizing margins of error, strength of relationship, and the synthesis of multiple studies through meta-analysis are moving from highly recommended to mandatory practices in scholarly outlets. This talk discusses some of the common abuses and misconceptions of the “old statistics” and highlights how the long-overdue transition to these “new statistics” will better serve science and the general public. Explanations will be more conceptual than mathematical, highlighting benefits both to data analysts and research consumers. The role of the QUAD center in supporting these best practice with students and faculty will also be discussed.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Doreen Simonsen and Daniel Rouslin
Faculty Colloquium Coordinators


Faculty Colloquium, Ivan Welty

Please join us this Friday, September 16th at 3 pm. in the Hatfield Room for our second Faculty Colloquium of this semester. Treats will be provided.

Ivan Welty, Associate Professor of Philosophy

Title: My Semester in Hanoi

Abstract: Last year I spent 6 months in Hanoi as a Fulbright US Scholar. In this talk, I’ll describe the experience, concentrating on (1) the current scene in Vietnam as I came to understand it; (2) tips for colleagues weighing their own Fulbright applications, including practical matters like housing and children’s schooling; and (3) possibilities for future collaboration and exchange with partners in Vietnam. So my aim is both to report my experience and to arouse interest at Willamette in Fulbright and Vietnam.

Please feel free to invite students to attend this talk.